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  2. This is really not a big deal at all. It was basically just canon law "housekeeping." As many of us are already aware, Roman Catholics and Eastern Catholics have different Codes of Canon Law; and both "branches" of Catholicism also have slightly different sacramental practices which were reflected in the respective Codes. De concordia inter Codices changes a few canons in order to eliminate some of the discrepancies, so as to resolve some of the questions that are arising as more and more Eastern Catholics are moving into predominately Latin territories. There's an English translation with a decent brief commentary here: https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/view.cfm?recnum=11370
  3. @Nihil Obstat Your view seems to take an overly narrow view of praise, and to set God at competition with His creation in a certain sense. “Society-like” things such as our work or acts of loving charity can at the same time be things that we enjoy and bring us pleasure, and things that also bring glory to God. Things like painting the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, for example, would fall into that category. And I do not see why more everyday things like having a friendly conversation with a loved one do not also bring glory to God. Let’s say that God creates a million stars, or a mountain range. I go out and marvel at their beauty. I marvel at the beautiful things that God has created. I recognize his love for beauty and his magnificent design. My recognition and enjoyment of the things God has created gives glory to God. Let’s say that you have two palaces. In the first palace there is no art on the walls. There is no music. There are no people there to welcome you. The palace contains nothing but an empty room with the King sitting in the center. On the other hand, when you enter the second palace, on the way to see the King you stop to look at the exquisite art on the walls. You stop to listen to the magnificent orchestra. You see that there are children playing happily, and that there are people all around enjoying themselves in sport and other forms of recreation. Then you enter the room of the King, who has made possible the art, the orchestra, the sports, etc. and delights in them. Which King is more glorious? Your new Earth seems to be like the first palace, while my new Earth is like the second palace. Those who share in the beatific vision have infinite happiness, but I don’t see why you conclude that this must therefore exclude all things material or render them superfluous. For one, we will have our perfected physical bodies, and there is joy and happiness to be found in that. Wouldn’t you find joy in being reunited with a lost loved one? Seeing him or her again? These are not things that take away from or distract from the infinite happiness that you find in the beatific vision. They are ultimately good things given to us by God, and they add to or complement the infinite happiness that is found in the beatific vision. I took a look through the last part of the supplement to the Summa. It certainly does not say anything like “Peace will play a game of basketball with his younger brother in Heaven” but I think there are a few things in the Summa that suggest that there is more to post-resurrection life than the beatific vision itself. For example, Q 93. Art. 1 asks "Whether the happiness of the saints will be greater after the judgment than before?" The author concludes that: Here, one of the objections seems to match your line of thinking (that because man will share in the beatific vision, there is nothing else beyond that which could contribute to his happiness): Here is how the author responds to that objection: At least as far as I understand it, the author indicates that although the joy experienced by the saints in the beatific vision is infinite, they will nevertheless experience a greater extent of joy through the body's physical glorification at the resurrection. The idea that you can take from this is that although the joy that man experiences through the beatific vision is infinite, it does not exclude him from experiencing joy by other means as well. We experience infinite joy through the beatific vision, but that does not preclude joy from other (more "material") sources as well, such as the body’s glorification. The Summa also speaks to the idea of experiencing God in different manners after the resurrection – intellectually through the beatific vision, but also indirectly through the interaction of our physical senses with His material creation. One does not seem to exclude the other, but rather they seem to complement each other. http://www.newadvent.org/summa/5091.htm http://www.newadvent.org/summa/5092.htm
  4. Yesterday I discovered Nicolas Barré, the founder of the Infant Jesus Sisters. He was a Minim Father and there are a lot of similarities between his spirituality and that of my own Br. Charles. Lately I've been getting one of my periodic restless fits, wishing I could be in religious life and thinking I could do "more good" as a sister. Barré has good advice on this: "The beauty of the world consists of many different kinds of beauty. If a tree wanted to glow with a brilliance of gold and if gold took on the green of the leaves, the flowers or the fruits of the tree, the whole of nature would be in disorder. So it is with the spiritual life; you must not try to follow the path that is right for another or lay claim to the same graces. This would lead to the ruination of everything, including oneself. It can truly be said of every saint: ‘There truly has been no other person like this one.'" He also speaks to my recurrent worries about becoming soft and selfish as a single woman, not really doing the will of God, and my tendency to second-guess myself at every turn: "Have you ever watched a feather drifting in the wind? Imagine if you were being carried by the wind like that feather! Be faithful in allowing yourself be led by God. Like a feather drifting in the wind, be receptive to the inspiration of the Spirit and obedient to what draws you." I can see that my constant urge to be doing "more good" and being "more useful" is an obstacle to poverty of spirit (my favourite beatitude...), as it means putting more faith in my capacities than in God's and it causes me to focus far too much on practicalities such as what career I should be doing rather than on who I am before the Lord. As one of the nuns from In This House of Brede asks a junior sister who has started to feel that their life is easy and wasteful, "Is it easier to be than to do?" We don't need to be in a monastery to know the power of simple prayer and presence, but I don't yet have enough faith in it.
  5. Today
  6. I hope you and your order's prayers for the end of abortion and contraception are just as fruitful.
  7. OK, I'm sorry. It was really late and I was ranting. And it looks like I was wrong about what you believe. I knew I might be wrong, and I'm glad I was. You're probably a better person than me. This election d the surrounding issues have brought up a lot of emotions. Forgive my rashness.
  8. perhaps i also should have just asked if atheism or agnosticism is the default position, and left those puking and pooing babies out of it.
  9. @LittleWaySoul @Sponsa-Christi your thoughts?
  10. Vee, i was very saddened to read your post as i could tell you truly believed this order was your calling. You had to experience more hardships than the average postulant does during the initial application process. i do not know if you still feel called but there are a couple of Orders that are not carmelite but live in an enclosure or adhere to a cloistered prayer life and the members appear to be joyful and content- Dominican nuns in Summit nJ live a very active healthy life as do the Franciscan TOR Sisters. the sister at Casa maria retreat center in al and of course the Passionist nuns in ky. I am very impressed with these orders and their way of life
  11. I do not know if anyone else has mentioned to you the Casa Maria convent and retreat House in AL. They seem like a gr8 match to what you described - 'We, the Sister Servants of the Eternal Word, are a new order that follows the Rule of St. Francis of Assisi with St. Dominic and St. Francis as our patrons. I envisioned a religious community whose structure would make possible a religious family rooted in a deep prayer life enabling its members to work from an enlightened and contemplative perspective. Our work of retreats and catechesis would necessarily focus in the Catholic Faith, thus nourishing the Sisters' spiritual lives as well as those of the people we serve." http://www.sisterservants.org/aboutus.php Hope this is helpful
  12. I agree. The Kingdom of God is not food and drink. After the Last Judgement, which works of charity will remain, in your opinion? My soul =/= me My soul + My body = Me http://www.phatmass.com/phorum/topic/143019-why-does-god/
  13. I am an Eastern Catholic myself, of the Syro Malabar Church. (Unofficial?) English translation of Raza (The Most Solemn Celebration of Holy Qurbana in the MarThoma Nasrani Church): http://www.nasranifoundation.org/books/pdf/Raza-TheMostSolemnCelebrationofHolyQurbana.pdf Syro Malabar Church history: https://www.syromalabarqatar.in/?page=church-history and http://www.nasranifoundation.org/books/pdf/ElementsOfSMCHistory.pdf Syro Malabar vestments, church architecture, Holy Qurbana (Mass) prayers and ceremonies explanation: Pdf download : http://tinyurl.com/pw6od3a Read online : http://tinyurl.com/pcdanwu Liturgy of the Hours, according to the Syro Malabar rite translated to English: http://www.nasranifoundation.org/books/pdf/DivinePraisesinAramaicTradition.pdf Please read the links if you want to more about my patrimony.
  14. benedictus should have voted atheist to give poll more variation. i read 'implicit' atheism might work for babies. the lines get blurry around the edges to be sure. there are atheists who say their own label is "clearly" what babies are. of course it all depends on the definition, but i contend if you have to pick a label, agnostic describes it better, cause to the every day man, atheists reject god and agnostisc are neutral. where i got to in a recent debate is that they said only oxford dictionary works, which says you can merely lack belief in God, and agnostics have some sort of proactive belief. of course, something like websters says different, and even an encylcopedia reinforced by idea of what it means to the comon joe in every day usage, but they insisted only oxford can be used. of course there are no official dictionaryies, words are too fluid for that. but i insist my idea of common usage is probably correct, though i can't say for sure. there are surely plenty who say babies are atheist on a simple google search. i dont think it does productive to define atheist as so vague on one hnd and so strict on the other, it goes against common understanding and it confuses the simple ideas involved. maybe i should have forced people to pick one "if you had to choose..." " But since babies talk in incomprehensible babble, don't do productive work, but insist that others provide for them and do everything for them, scream and cry and throw fits whenever they don't get their way, and puke and poo all over those who look over them, I'd say maybe they're best described as simply "liberal." " hilarious
  15. Pope Francis, Apostolic Letter issued Motu Proprio, "De concordia inter Codices" modifying some norms of the Code of Canon Law (31 May 2016) In Latin: http://w2.vatican.va/content/francesco/la/motu_proprio/documents/papa-francesco-motu-proprio_20160531_de-concordia-inter-codices.html In Italian: http://w2.vatican.va/content/francesco/it/motu_proprio/documents/papa-francesco-motu-proprio_20160531_de-concordia-inter-codices.html What exactly did it do? How necessary was it?
  16. I am still caught up in the joy of participating in the Women's March yesterday. So many many people, all ages, and skin tones, and religions, whole families, multi-generational, from the great-grandmother being pushed in her wheelchair to the new babies being pushed in their strollers or strapped securely to their parents' hearts. Such a crowd, but no pushing, or complaining. Just so much friendliness, courtesy, and patience everywhere. The Metro was packed to capacity and moving so slowly, once it was possible to find a train with any room onto which one could squeeze in. But everyone was just introducing themselves to one another. Omaha. Michigan. Atlanta. Seattle. One woman and daughter told me their day had begun with a special prayer service in the Synagogue. (Members of my order had met at a Parish Church for 9:00am before setting out.) One of my colleagues participated in an inter-faith Jewish and Muslim service planned to start the day. . . Along the way, I stopped and joined with many as two Muslim Imams preached from the sidewalk, asking us all to know the real meaning of Islam is surrendering to God and living in peace. Wonderfully creative signs. One of my students had spelled out her message of "Building Bridges, not Walls," by substituting symbols of different religions, or the universal sign for "disability access," or a picture of the earth etc for the letters. Colors mattered too, she explained, since the "n, g, B" were colors of the Mexican flag. So artistic and intelligent both! Of course I was happy to find one man carrying a sign with one of my favorite quotations from Letter from Birmingham Jail: "Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere." I did not see this next sign myself but one of my colleagues posted a picture of a white gentleman holding a sign that said: "Hands off my Muslim and Hispanic neighbors." My favorite sweatshirt was worn by an older man with a long white hair and a white beard: "You can't scare me. I have a daughter." That cracked me up. I told him how much I liked it, but I didn't feel like asking if I could take a picture of it. It was a truly amazing day. And I do believe God's spirit was moving among us. Then to come home and find out similar marches were happening all over the country--and around the globe, even in Nairobi. My heart is filled with praise to God and gratitude.
  17. Prince of Persia (the 2008 reboot)
  18. Reading 1 Is 8:23—9:3 First the Lord degraded the land of Zebulun and the land of Naphtali; but in the end he has glorified the seaward road, the land west of the Jordan, the District of the Gentiles. Anguish has taken wing, dispelled is darkness: for there is no gloom where but now there was distress. The people who walked in darkness have seen a great light; upon those who dwelt in the land of gloom a light has shone. You have brought them abundant joy and great rejoicing, as they rejoice before you as at the harvest, as people make merry when dividing spoils. For the yoke that burdened them, the pole on their shoulder, and the rod of their taskmaster you have smashed, as on the day of Midian. Responsorial Psalm Ps 27:1, 4, 13-14 R. (1a) The Lord is my light and my salvation. The LORD is my light and my salvation; whom should I fear? The LORD is my life's refuge; of whom should I be afraid? R. The Lord is my light and my salvation. One thing I ask of the LORD; this I seek: To dwell in the house of the LORD all the days of my life, That I may gaze on the loveliness of the LORD and contemplate his temple. R. The Lord is my light and my salvation. I believe that I shall see the bounty of the LORD in the land of the living. Wait for the LORD with courage; be stouthearted, and wait for the LORD. R. The Lord is my light and my salvation. Reading 2 1 Cor 1:10-13, 17 I urge you, brothers and sisters, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that all of you agree in what you say, and that there be no divisions among you, but that you be united in the same mind and in the same purpose. For it has been reported to me about you, my brothers and sisters, by Chloe's people, that there are rivalries among you. I mean that each of you is saying, "I belong to Paul," or "I belong to Apollos," or "I belong to Cephas," or "I belong to Christ." Is Christ divided? Was Paul crucified for you? Or were you baptized in the name of Paul? For Christ did not send me to baptize but to preach the gospel, and not with the wisdom of human eloquence, so that the cross of Christ might not be emptied of its meaning. Alleluia Mt 4:23 R. Alleluia, alleluia. Jesus proclaimed the Gospel of the kingdom and cured every disease among the people. R. Alleluia, alleluia. Gospel MT 4:12-23 When Jesus heard that John had been arrested, he withdrew to Galilee. He left Nazareth and went to live in Capernaum by the sea, in the region of Zebulun and Naphtali, that what had been said through Isaiah the prophet might be fulfilled: Land of Zebulun and land of Naphtali, the way to the sea, beyond the Jordan, Galilee of the Gentiles, the people who sit in darkness have seen a great light, on those dwelling in a land overshadowed by death light has arisen. From that time on, Jesus began to preach and say, "Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand." As he was walking by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon who is called Peter, and his brother Andrew, casting a net into the sea; they were fishermen. He said to them, "Come after me, and I will make you fishers of men." At once they left their nets and followed him. He walked along from there and saw two other brothers, James, the son of Zebedee, and his brother John. They were in a boat, with their father Zebedee, mending their nets. He called them, and immediately they left their boat and their father and followed him. He went around all of Galilee, teaching in their synagogues, proclaiming the gospel of the kingdom, and curing every disease and illness among the people. or Mt 4:12-17 When Jesus heard that John had been arrested, he withdrew to Galilee. He left Nazareth and went to live in Capernaum by the sea, in the region of Zebulun and Naphtali, that what had been said through Isaiah the prophet might be fulfilled: Land of Zebulun and land of Naphtali, the way to the sea, beyond the Jordan, Galilee of the Gentiles, the people who sit in darkness have seen a great light, on those dwelling in a land overshadowed by death light has arisen. From that time on, Jesus began to preach and say, "Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand." - - - Lectionary for Mass for Use in the Dioceses of the United States, second typical edition, Copyright © 2001, 1998, 1997, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine; Psalm refrain © 1968, 1981, 1997, International Committee on English in the Liturgy, Inc. All rights reserved. Neither this work nor any part of it may be reproduced, distributed, performed or displayed in any medium, including electronic or digital, without permission in writing from the copyright owner. source
  19. I want to do well and have two tests to pass this week for this class.
  20. I don't think you understood what I meant. I don't mean that women can't be called to leadership roles, work, etc, and still be feminine. What I meant was that the feminists who are pushing for their own set of values these days usually spit on the housewife/mother roles. Women who are called to a vocation outside of marriage still show these innate knacks for things that involve a nurturing touch. Nuns who make things to sell, like soap and baked goods, or those who sew vestments for priests to wear at Mass, show their ability to be maternal to those who aren't her biological children. It's also why the head of a convent or monastery is called Mother. They are the ones who look after the other nuns and ensure their well-being. When I was a child, I was a bit of both when it comes to the girly and the tomboyish. I would play with all the dolls I could get my hands on, but I also enjoyed racing remote-controlled cars, Hot Wheels, and Tonka trucks. So please don't take it personally if it sounds like I'm trying to squeeze all women into one set of roles or values. All I'm saying is that you can see a clear divide in some of these feminists and the women at pro-life rallies and the like. The pro-life women are usually praying their Rosaries or holding signs, hoping that anyone who is considering walking into an abortion clinic has a change of heart (especially those who are post-abortive, because they know the trauma of the experience). Many of the pro-choice protesters are clearly angry and unsettled. When we go too far from gifts that God has given each of the sexes, it begins to reflect in our behavior. " Think about it. Under your ideal world, I presume, men can be leaders, pioneers, warriors, adventurers, preachers, kings, basically people out in the world making grand changes while women must stay in the home and be content with raising a handful of humans that dad, who is out most of the time providing materially for his family and/or changing the world, has final authority over anyway. " Well, for the preaching part, only men are called to the preaching that is tied to priesthood. I never meant to sound like "women must stay in the home" is my party line. Also, the one thing you left out of this equation is the fact that women who are called to motherhood ('called' being the operative word) love, nurture, and raise the men who go out and make grand changes, which means they are making grand changes themselves. When it comes to families, the best model is the Holy Family. Women who try to emulate Mary, in their own way, help present her Son to others in a way that leads to great amounts of holiness. She's the ideal mother and wife in every way, shape, and form. For those who are not called to marriage, that doesn't make them less of a woman. It just means that God has something else in mind for them, and that's completely fine. Thank you for the welcome.
  21. Fr. Lambert, the oldest of the Irish Dominican friars, just turned 100! He seems to be working with EWTN in Alabama. http://dominicans.ie/fr-lambert-at-100-years-old/ * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Sr. Marie Bernadette, the oldest Dominican nun - she's French - turns 110! http://www.op.org/en/content/sr-marie-bernadette-oldest-dominican-nun-celebrates-110
  22. I don't buy this. Women being homemakers and men being breadwinners is not ancient tradition it's the tradition of a narrow slice of human history. I think if your called to be a mother, great. I think if you're a woman and called to be a leader, like Joan of arc, who was a total bad ass, you should do that too. I had a decent struggle accepting that I was female because of this narrow pontification about what femininity is. Because I wanted to be strong, be a leader. I've never liked delicate, flowery, or stereotypically girly things. It was a significant identity crisis of my youth. I'm a woman because I have two x chromosomes and a body that matches that. Not because my personality aligns with some stupid culturally-contingent characteristics. I'm sorry to be so fiesty. You seem very sweet and docile, while I'm kind of a hard-nosed pain in the are. Don't take it personally. I find your understanding of femininity offensive, but I know you're well-intentioned. I can also empathize with these dirty feminists though, when these type of attacks are levied against them. You may see motherhood as the epitome of what it means to be feminine, but it doesn't seem the converse (that fatherhood is the epitome of masculinity) is really promoted. So while you may genuinely believe that "the hand that rocks the cradle rules the world." To me it seems like a patronizing slogan designed to placate women rather than a genuine elevation of womenhood. The may see it as lowering women to brood mares. I think many women have talents they should share with the world and the wider community that do not involve their reproductive or homemaking abilities. Think about it. Under your ideal world, I presume, men can be leaders, pioneers, warriors, adventurers, preachers, kings, basically people out in the world making grand changes while women must stay in the home and be content with raising a handful of humans that dad, who is out most of the time providing materially for his family and/or changing the world, has final authority over anyway. Maybe your friend thinks your entire worldview is sexist? Rather than merely your pro-life stance? I don't know enough about you to conclude if your views are somewhat anti-women (not against all women, just against the ones that don't fit your proscribed version of femininity I.e. most of us), but it might be. Have you considered that? When the pro-life movement becomes wrapped up in this culture war of traditional gender roles it loses focus, and actually hurts the pro-life cause for reasons already stated. BTW welcome to phatmass
  23. 1. Babies are best described as asleep or awake, calm or fussy, wet or dry, hungry or fed. In that order. 2. Belief in God requires more cognition than babies can muster. I think you know that. 3. Babies do not require proof that God exists; they ARE proof that God exists. Really, do you have nothing more productive to do with your time than dream up pointless questions?
  24. Hm. No, I very strongly disagree that there will be anything resembling society in heaven/post-general judgement. If someone shows me a Patristic commentary to the contrary I will happily change my view, but I have not seen it. There is nothing higher than contemplation and praise of God in His presence. No 'personality', no culture, no talent, no preference is meaningful or in fact even valuable if it is not from God, thus if it is not from God it will be burned away, and if it is from God it will be experienced directly in His presence. Our bodies are created by God and are therefore fundamentally good, therefore it is good and right that we will be reunited with them in the resurrection. But it does not follow that we need to use our bodies for 'society-like things' after the resurrection. Like everything else, the ultimate purpose for our bodies is to praise God. After the judgement there is nothing else, simply eternal life in His presence. What else could there be?
  25. Your view strikes me as a bit gnostic. It sounds as though you perceive heaven to be some zen-like state rather than an actual physical place where men do physical things with their bodies (such as work or acts of charity). But perhaps I am reading you wrong. Sorry if I have. In your view what is the reason for having a physically resurrected body? Angels can engage in unending praise and contemplation. . . one need not have a physical body to do those things. If God intends for us to be fundamentally different creatures at the end of time why give us bodies at all (let alone the same body that we have here and now)? I don't know if we will have countries, governments, companies, jobs, "society", sports clubs, movie theaters etc. in heaven. But I don't see why not. God created us as physical beings with unique personalities, cultures, talents, preferences, etc. and enabled us to express ourselves in different ways, create, and experience those things. The fact that we will share in the beatific vision and therefore have perfect happiness does not necessarily exclude them. They will not be in competition with God, or take away from our union with God, but rather, they will be things that bring glory to Him. We will love our neighbor perfectly and welcome our neighbor into our home or our land and that will bring glory to God. If that is the case then it seems to me that we should be attempting to do the same thing here and now.
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