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  2. Friday before Easter is a stock market holiday. Both the stock market and the bond market are closed on April 19, 2019, in recognition of Good Friday ahead of Sunday's Easter holiday. The bond market also closes early on Thursday, April 18 for Maundy Thursday, another holy day tied to Easter. Stock and bond trading resume on Monday, the day after Easter. The following is a complete schedule of all stock market and bond market holidays for 2019. Please note that regular trading hours for the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) and Nasdaq Stock Market are 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Eastern on weekdays. The stock markets close at 1 p.m. on early-closure days; bond markets close early at 2 p.m. interesting how this tradition got started! myth contends that the NYSE opened on a Good Friday and the terrible Black Friday crash occurred. Thus, chastened and shaken, the Governors vowed never to open on a Good Friday again. the last time the New York Stock Exchange was open on Good Friday was 1907.
  3. BarbaraTherese

    Thank you

    Thank you to those who chose to contact me via Private Message. I am ok. On the human level I am struggling. I have had to throw out contents of my refrigerator and will need to buy a new refrigerator on Tuesday after the Easter break; meanwhile, I have been without a fridge since yesterday. Re-stocking the fridge is going to be costly and money I really do not have and I need to buy a new fridge on rental purchase - cant really afford that either. It is all a bit of a financial headache just now but "this too shall pass". The other thing that will pass is my little Maltese Cross, Buddie, refusing his medication no matter what I tried. Finally, I got it into him by crushing the tablet and putting it in a small amount of milk. He already had diarrhea over the past few days and I am hoping the small amount of milk will not increase the problem. Not the best of thing to have to clean up first thing in the morning but jolly good it is on the vinyl and not the carpet (counting my blessings). These things are extremely minor in the bigger picture. In fact, I was happy to have something to endure at the commencement of the Easter Triduum as we go into Easter Saturday. On the human level it is all a bit of a worry while on the spiritual level I have been happy while repentant that I have not born it better than I have. But I have borne it as I was able........very far from perfection, not even close. But the Good Lord does not ask success, rather at desire and effort. Falling far short is a blessed opportunity for self knowledge and humility. Success is always The Lord's Domain alone. He grants success where He May and withholds it wherever He May. All is Good, all is Grace. I am overwhelmingly and extremely grateful that I live alone and able to speak with The Lord aloud, and I often do. I am reminded again of St Teresa's bookmark: Let nothing disturb you, Let nothing frighten you, All things are passing; God only is changeless. Patience gains all things. Who has God wants nothing. God alone suffices.
  4. Gary david

    Drop a word, keep a word

    Holy words
  5. Today
  6. CatherineM

    Wife or the Other Woman?

    Granting annulments was way above my pay grade. I just worked on the paperwork. I have often said that seeking divorce is a symptom that something was wrong from the beginning. Usually they didn’t understand what marriage really meant. I never saw a couple in tribunal who I felt had a truly sacramental marriage. Just my experience. Not scientific. I should also say that a marriage can survive infidelity. It takes work, but can be done.
  7. little2add

    Drop a word, keep a word

    Angry words
  8. littlebell

    Wife or the Other Woman?

    Wow Lilllabet, I've noticed a judgemental tone in several of your past posts, but you really outdid yourself in this one. Who are you to judge someone you never even met, and don't know anything about? People like you are one of the reasons I'm no longer Catholic.
  9. cruciatacara

    Wife or the Other Woman?

    I am so happy for you that you are without sin and can cast stones at others. That must feel so good. Yes,my brother made mistakes and yes he sinned, but the Church did not help him in the situation, it failed him. No, he did not end up with a 'hardbody' whatever you mean by that, but with a kind and loving woman, unlike the Catholic sociopath he married. And as for celibacy, that was how he spent most of his first marriage because she was always out cheating. I won't even try to find any compassion in you because you seem to love the laws of the Pharisees more than the mercy of God. All I was trying to show was that there are two sides to every story but your response was like the story of the man and the woman and the donkey... no matter what they did, people judged them as doing the wrong thing. I'm just grateful that my own Catholic friends aren't so 'judgy, judgy, judgy'. Out of here.
  10. Yesterday
  11. Gary david

    Drop a word, keep a word

    ANGRY TEACHER Yiks! Better not forget your homework!!
  12. cappie

    Good Friday

    We are two people in this story of the Passion . Peter, and Jesus’ mother, Mary, and we are like both of them. We are the ones who deny him, and the ones who will not be kept away from him but stay with him until the bitter end. Peter is the most human of the disciples, he is impulsive and loud to the point of being ridiculous and obnoxious, but he is also so passionate in his love for Jesus, on fire to be a good disciple. “Even if I have to die with you, Lord,” he says, “I will never betray you.” Peter says this and we say it too without thinking it through. It is a rash promise. No doubt Peter thinks he means it, but underneath that, he is trying to stand out in the crowd of the disciples. But when the moment comes to live out our promises of loyalty, suddenly we do everything to make ourselves inconspicuous. Instead of loudly claiming our allegiance to Jesus we look around with Peter try to look ordinary and uninteresting, and say, “Who me? Jesus? Never heard of him.” Or more likely in our day and time, “Well, I’m spiritual but not religious.” Sometimes the denial can be as easy as simply not opening our mouths at all, not defending someone who is attacked, not speaking out when we see something unjust. And no matter how it happens, eventually the pickle crows. Somehow, in some way, we hear that dreaded sound, see Jesus look across the courtyard at us with hurt—but also with such tenderness and love in his eyes. We are all Peter. There is someone else who weeps bitterly in this story, because she is paying the price of having been the most faithful person to him on Earth: his mother, Mary. Mary has shown loyalty and love to Jesus since before he was born, since the day she said yes to the angel Gabriel. In a very real way, she gave up her life for him before he gave up his life for her. She gave up her reputation and her respectability by getting pregnant out of wedlock and bearing the hostile stares and nasty comments of her community. She faced potentially not even being able to marry at all if Joseph didn’t have enough trust in God to listen to his dreams. And for thirty long years, before Jesus set about his true work, she bore the knowledge every day that she had the responsibility for the safety and nurture of the Son of the Living God. And now she must watch as he dies in front of her eyes. Did she feel like she had failed in her one task on Earth, to keep Jesus safe? She must have known there was nothing she could do to save or protect him, not against the full weight of both the religious and the Roman authorities. In fact, she was in grave danger herself. She could have been used as leverage against Jesus. They could have arrested her to try and control him. But she didn’t care. She offered herself freely as the hand of the Lord thirty-three years ago, and she is still doggedly carrying out that promise today as she walks the streets of Jerusalem and climbs the hill to Golgotha to see her son crucified. We have elements of her courage and her faithfulness within us as well. We are here today, witnessing with our eyes and hearts fully open to the pain, the crucifixion of our beloved Jesus. The aching, weeping heart of devotion that impelled Mary to stand at the foot of the Cross and see her worst nightmare come to life, beats within us too. That’s why we’re gathered here today. Some of us will find it harder to admit that we are Peter, so convicted of our own amesomeness that we continue to insist we’ll never deny Jesus. Some of us will find it harder to admit that we are Mary, so convicted of our own sinfulness who will never measure up to God’s demands, who could never be vessels of grace to the world. The truth is, we are both Peter and Mary, and we have to bring both of ourselves to the foot of the Cross. This is the legacy of our fallen nature, what makes us as human beings broken creatures. We can never heal this through our own effort. We bring ourselves to the foot of the Cross today and surrender ourselves to Jesus’ healing grace. Does this mean that because we’ve come to church on Good Friday and offered our sin and pain to Jesus on the Cross, we’ll wake up on Easter Sunday freed of all our sinful impulses? No. That’s why we come to church every Sunday, every Holy Week. The healing of ourselves, the bringing of our Peter and our Mary into harmony. That is the Christian life. And it all starts here, at the foot of the Cross.
  13. Lilllabettt

    Wife or the Other Woman?

    This article was written by the friend of the wife. Typically women initiate divorce, but when the man does it, it's often the scenario described. Curious, did you go to your brothers "wedding"? Did his new "wife" happen to be a younger hardbody? In case it's not clear, I'm not your brothers biggest fan - not least of all because he tried to use an innocent child to "fix" an abusive relationship. Fyi, being knee deep in adoptionland myself, its extremely unlikely they would have been approved to adopt unless he lied about his marriage. Then, only once the child is 18 and no longer is trapped in this horrible situation, THEN your brother decided to do something about it. HE couldn't take it anymore, although for 2 decades he made sure his child had to take it. Now, the child can take a divorce, too. Ok. Did the priest tell your brother to do all that? Please. Unfortunately by committing adultery, your brother is indeed doing evil, and living in grave sin. Protecting himself and his child while remaining faithful to his vows (e.g., separation, or civil divorce +celibacy) was and is an option for him. But he didn't/hasnt chosen that path. He went and got a side piece, and left the Church because his behavior wasn't acceptable. When we get married we should understand that the vows contain a commitment to practice celibacy should circumstances require. For the vast majority of married people, the need for celibacy does arise at one point.
  14. little2add

    Drop a word, keep a word

    Substitute teacher
  15. little2add

    Drop a word, keep a word

    Teachers pet
  16. Gary david

    Wife or the Other Woman?

    All good points you have made for sure. Humans are so complicated arent they? A solution for one with the same problem is poison for another. As far as preists as councilors, well like anything else there are good ones and others that should have no business in counciling something without understanding. Also I believe that it used to be that there were far less divorces due to the fact that that people were subject to shame if they had chosen divorce. Thats not a factor anymore as this is truth for many topics today. What is the correct answer? For me I really dont know.
  17. cruciatacara

    Wife or the Other Woman?

    Although I do understand the point of the article, I have concerns about the obvious partiality towards the 'poor and downtrodden' (my words) wife. It sounds like it was written by her. My brother was married (in the Church) to a woman who abused him for nearly 30 years. She cheated on him with other men, including his best friend (so called obviously), she gambled and ran up huge debts for him to repay and she verbally abused him and made him feel like he was nothing. He was going to leave her at around the 8 year mark because he couldn't take it anymore, but the priest in his case told him that he just wasn't 'satisfying' her as a man and that is why she cheated (never mind all the other things she did). A celibate priest thinks he knows what will satisfy a sociopathic woman. Just when he couldn't take it anymore, they were approved for an adoption of a child after being on a waiting list for years, so he stayed, thinking a child would help the marriage. Another 18 years of abuse but now she was also abusing the child,who grew up without any morals himself, stealing, doing drugs etc. Finally, my brother couldn't take it anymore and as the child was now an adult, he left her. He met another woman and started seeing her. His wife had the support of her family and the Church and tried to make him feel as if he were an evil sinner, so he solved his problem by not only divorcing her but leaving the Church as well. He joined another faith where divorce was permissible and later remarried the 'other woman', who treats him well. I am not saying what he did was right, but it makes me look at these stories from the point of both parties, and realise that I can't judge another person's marriage problems. I think priests are not the best people to counsel couples since they are unmarried and celibate. I think the priests in both the article and my brother's case should have referred them to a professional marriage counselor, and stayed out of the thing entirely. Relationships are hard enough without using God and the Church to confuse the issues. I say this because another one of my brother's was also having marriage problems, and they were on the point of breaking up for quite awhile, and did in fact separate. But they sought professional marriage counselling during their separation and spent a lot of time working on rebuilding their relationship. They reunited and are still together today after 30 plus years. When the underlying issues are deep, priests need to recognise their limitations and stop giving advice about things they don't really understand. The woman in the article may indeed have been the injured party in the marriage but it has all the earmarks of a stereotype mid-life crisis story where the man leaves wife of many years for hot young woman and gets all the money and happy times. That is the perspective of the wife, but what was the story behind all this? Things are rarely as cut and dried as they look. That's all I'm saying. As for annulments, I have never really understood them - some people get them easily, others have lots of problems. Some rich and famous people seem to have it easier than others - is it all about money or who you know in the hierarchy? Why do some long term marriages get them and not others?
  18. Gary david

    Holy Thursday

    Well that is a very well said and blessed statement worthy of deep reflection. I have been saying words such as these for a long time. As you said, that "lightbulb moment". Thats the moment people dont seem to not understand or dont want to, because if they did live these words, then they would have to change their lives. The words Jesus lived and said were not complicated. It is people that complicate things seemingly to make excuses for not living those words. Well thats how it seems anyway. I really dont know why, only God does. That was kind of you to have written those words. God bless....
  19. Gary david

    Wife or the Other Woman?

    I just read your comment and then that article. I do find it wrong and sad. The article doesent go into what was was wrong in these marriges. Maybe its not important. What should be important is Gods law and everyone sticking to it. This subject came up today with someone at work. I forget just how it came up but he mentioned that fact of how many divorces there are in this country and I agreed. He is from Poland and has lived here for about 15 years. I asked him if divorce was prevalent in Poland. He said there are many but not at all like here. He stopped for a while and seemed in deep thought. He then began to recall when he was younger and remembered his childhood with his parents. He said my mother stayed with my father all those years and he wondered if that had been.a good idea or not. He didnt go into a lot of detail but he did say he didnt have many good memories because of his father. He said there was much mental abuse. His mother eventualy did leave him, but now he seems to wonder if things would have been better if she had left him a long time ago. He said the only reason she stayed was for fear of not having any income to.support herself and child. I guess he feels sad for his mother having spent all those years just making bad memories. This is just one story out of countless others I am certain. My feeling on this is that I think it was better that she stayed as long as she did. Its a very confusing world. And I guess its going to get even more confusing and scary as time goes on. Talk to you later. God bless.....
  20. Lilllabettt

    Wife or the Other Woman?

    I read this and was enraged: Husband, Wife, and the Other Woman: who will you stand with? Certainly the Catholic Church has a long history of casting the faithful aside. When my sister was facing the prospect of divorce, her chief fear was not the decades of celibacy she might face in remaining faithful to her vows, but the risk of a rubber stamp annulment that would strip her of her rights and dignity and declare her a hapless dupe. @CatherineM didnt you grant pretty much 100% of annulments? I recall you saying something like, the fact someine is seeking an annulment is itself proof that the marriage wasnt real.
  21. cappie

    Holy Thursday

    It had been a busy week. Jesus and the disciples finally make it to Jerusalem and not a moment too soon. The city was crowded! It was the week of the Passover celebration and it seemed as though every man, woman, and child for a hundred miles was in the city of Jerusalem. People were everywhere. Every shop, tavern, and stall had a line of people just waiting to get in. Luckily, the disciples had a place to stay Jesus had seen to that. He seemed to have friends just about everywhere and there was a big room to celebrate the Passover feast together above the store of an oil merchant from Jericho, whose brother Jesus had healed. So tonight, they are in the upper room with Jesus, sharing the Passover meal. A mixture of nostalgia and fear as they tell the ancient stories of redemption and salvation. In the middle of the meal, Jesus takes up the servant’s towel and basin and starts to wash feet. They had eaten Passover with Jesus before, but somehow this one seems oddly different. Why is he suddenly wanting to wash feet? Something must be wrong. This isn’t how things are supposed to be. Washing feet is a servant’s job, not a job for our master and teacher. After all the walking that had been done that day, we can imagine their feet are tired and sore and now Jesus wants to wash them like a common servant? After he washed their feet, they were silent. A heaviness filled the air, they didn’t know what to do. Jesus starts speaking. “Where I am going, you cannot come. I give you a new commandment, that you love one another. Just as I have loved you, you also should love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.” Lightbulb moment. That is what all of this had been about. All the preaching, teaching, feeding. It’s about love. It’s all about love. It’s about how we love God, love our neighbours, and love ourselves. His washing feet, his sharing the Passover meal, his outrageous behaviour all along was to show what love looks like. Traveling with Jesus for so long, the disciples can sometimes forget that his message is about loving deeply, truly, and earnestly. All of what we had done and seen in following Jesus suddenly made sense in this one moment at supper. On this night, the night before he died, Jesus reminds us again that our commission, our call, our command, is to be a people of love. Too often, we as the Church can, like Simon Peter, get so caught up in being the Church, in worrying about our worship, our ministries, our mission, that we lose sight of Jesus’ command to love one another. Loving one another is perhaps the most difficult of commands. It means that we have to first learn to love ourselves—see ourselves as worthy of accepting, giving, and sharing love. Jesus not only spoke kind words and did great deeds— he comforted and healed and gave hope for a brighter future. He embodied love. We are called to do the same. Our world cries out to see the face of Jesus, to walk the way of love, to experience a church that not only preaches love—but demonstrates love. Singer and songwriter Tina Turner famously asked, “What’s love got to do with it?” For we who would follow Jesus, the answer is simple: everything! Our inability to live what we preach about love would remove Christ from our Christianity. If we as the Church are to be relevant or meaningful in our world, we must rediscover that hope-filled love that enflamed Jesus’ first followers and inspired a movement that changed the world. Our challenge is to be a people of love, to live the words we pray and sing a faith that loves.
  22. Gary david

    Saint of the day-april 17th

    Saint Benedict Joseph Labre April 17. Saint Benedict Joseph Labre lived a poor life in the ruins of the Colosseum. To the uneducated eye, he appeared to be a pitiable figure, but the people of Rome saw him as a saint. He was known as the beggar of Rome God bless.... .
  23. BarbaraTherese

    The Ultimate Paradox

    Jesus is raised to Glory on a cross. He is bruised and battered, bloody, dying and then dead on a cross. In that is His Glorious Victory. It is the ultimate paradox in Catholicism and our spirituality. We too in our sufferings, united to those of Jesus, are raised to Glory. In our sufferings united to Jesus, we are a witness to life’s meaning and the ultimate paradox. The Cross goes ahead of us as our symbol. It states that life does have meaning; that at life’s lowest point in suffering, there is meaning and victory. There is Glory. The Ultimate Paradox
  24. Gary david

    Drop a word, keep a word

    Friendly pet That was a funny one Little2. Made me laugh!
  25. Last week
  26. little2add

    Holy week in three minutes

    Spy Wednesday 2019
  27. little2add

    Drop a word, keep a word

    Pet friendly
  28. Amata Christi

    Countdown Thread!!!

    15 days to go!
  29. We might be having an elderly priest (who uses a walker) celebrate Mass Holy Thursday evening. In such a case, is it liturgically permissible to have an Extraordinary Minister of Holy Communion carry the Blessed Sacrament in procession to the altar of repose - or would we simply omit the procession and do it privately and without solemnity after the Mass when people have left? Thank you.
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