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  1. beatitude

    beatitude

    Mediator of Meh


    • Points

      31

    • Content count

      2,228


  2. Sister Leticia

    Sister Leticia

    Catholic Religious


    • Points

      22

    • Content count

      262


  3. BarbaraTherese

    BarbaraTherese

    Chummy Commoner


    • Points

      17

    • Content count

      6,756


  4. TheresaThoma

    TheresaThoma

    Church Militant


    • Points

      16

    • Content count

      3,941



Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 03/22/2018 in all areas

  1. 9 points
    Nihil Obstat

    I am going to be a dad

    We are expecting a baby girl this August. I am very excited.
  2. 8 points
    beatitude

    Discerning: How do you know you are in the right vocation?

    Vocations aren't like clothes. You don't need to try every single one on to see which is the perfect fit. By that logic you'd have to date every single person and do a live-in with every single community, just to be sure that you're really in the right place. I think lots of people get anxious that they're going to make the 'wrong' choice and be really unhappy. God doesn't work like that. He will bring joy out of every good choice we make. So providing your decision is pure ("I'm not sure I'm meant to be a nun, but I see You in so much of what they do, so I'll give it a shot, Lord!" as opposed to, "People in my parish will be impressed if I'm a nun") it will be blessed. Maybe you'll make final vows in that community, and maybe you'll realise the life is not for you and you will leave - but either way, God will bring good out of your efforts. The same with marriage. "I love So-and-so and being around him makes me want to be the best person I can be," is likely to lead to a good choice. "I'm frightened of being alone, so I'd better get married," is not. I met a community about a decade ago now, and at first we thought I wouldn't be able to live their life because of various neurological disabilities I have. But we became friends and I visited them often, just as a friend. Recently they said that if I wanted to try their life, I would be very welcome, and they would do everything they could to make it possible for me. We will discover together if it's right. I still have doubts about my aptitude, but I won't know unless I try. It really has been that simple. As for spiritual direction, when I was discerning religious life, I visited a handful of communities (besides the one above, whose ministry I felt was beyond me). The prioresses of the two monasteries I visited spoke to me in depth for a few hours and they had a lot of questions, but neither of them asked if I was receiving spiritual direction. They wanted to know about how long I'd been a Catholic, moments in my life that led me towards religious life, my current job and living situation - basically lots of things that gave them a picture of my prayer life, my capacity to live with others, and so on. I know that if I asked for entrance I would have had to provide a character reference, but it wouldn't have had to come from a spiritual director. Receiving spiritual direction can be an extremely valuable thing, but it isn't the be-all and end-all. I have known people who use their lack of spiritual director almost as an excuse: they can spend hours browsing community websites, they talk about discernment online, they go on retreats...but they never take steps towards actually entering, because they're waiting to find a spiritual director. And waiting. And waiting. In some cases this seems to be down to a fear of making the 'wrong' choice: the person wants someone to tell them explicitly that yes, they're doing the right thing. In other cases it seems to be fascination with religious life combined by fear of it, and unless they're willing to face up to the fear, it's doubtful that a spiritual director could help much, as another impediment would just rise up to the supplant the absence of SD. "Oh, my SD is a diocesan priest, but I don't think he's the right fit for me, I need a religious." Or, "I'm just so confused. I only get to see my SD for an hour a month, and it isn't enough. I need more regular direction!" and so on. SD can be very enriching, but as the name 'direction' implies, it's only useful if you enter it with the idea of getting somewhere, as opposed to a way of stalling.
  3. 6 points
    Totus Tuus Maria

    Prayers for telling family about entering!

    Dear phatmass family please pray for me as I will be telling my father and sister this week about entering the convent next fall.(!) I recently went on a discernment retreat (my second with this order) and I am sure this is where God is calling me to and I feel it is the right time to tell them. My father and my sister are the last to really know because they have been taking it the hardest so far. So please pray for them as I continue to discern God’s will. Especially for my father who does not have a faith life and truly does not understand.
  4. 6 points
    Sister Leticia

    Cloister? Not cloistered?

    People also assume only cloistered religious are "contemplative". I belong to an apostolic congregation which is fully apostolic and fully contemplative. One flows from and leads to the other, rather like the double movement of breathing in and breathing out. I would also add that I have a Cistercian friend who is deeply contemplative and prayerful, spends a lot of time in personal prayer, reading and reflection as well as prayer with the community... and is incredibly busy. This is the reality for those in smaller monasteries (fewer than 20), as people often have more than one responsibility, and everyone has to pitch in/take turns with various jobs. In the sort of huge monastery featured in "In this House of Brede", for example, single responsibilities are the norm - eg cellarer, choir mistress, infirmarian, sacristan, plus several cooks, gardeners etc. This doesn't mean they are less busy, of course - a huge monastery = several invalids, full-time kitchen duties and so on - but it does mean they're not pulled in various directions. So there is always a tension between a compelling call to prayer and the need to fulfil responsibilities and keep the monastery going, the sick cared for, bills paid, everyone nourished and so on. A cloistered nun might well want to go for a long contemplative walk or spend time in the chapel, but first she has to do the laundry or spend 2 hours making communion wafers. It's a tension also felt by apostolic religious - after all, our relationship with God, nourished by prayer, is what brought us into religious life! But you learn to be with God, wherever you are, to cultivate some sort of interior silence, and to make the most of opportunities, however brief, for prayer.
  5. 6 points
    BarbaraTherese

    For my son

    A prayer for my son would be really appreciated. He has applied for a position that will bring him in contact daily with people and he has always been a caring person, concerned for others. He wont know for another 6 to 8 weeks whether his application has been successful or not. He has to go through a few assessments. Thank you St Joseph The Worker, please pray for him
  6. 6 points
    Luigi

    First visit anxiety

    Write yourself a few short sentences that you can repeat as off as necessary. I use afraid, scared, nervous, and anxious interchangeably. Customize the wording to suit your own thoughts/feelings. 1. I feel that God might calling me to that place; I'm going so I can find out. So I don't have to be afraid. 2. The people I will meet there were called by God to that place; I don't have to be afraid. 3. The people I will meet in that place were probably nervous the first time they came, too; therefore, they'll understand my nervousness. 4. God is going with me to that place; God is already in that place; therefore, I don't have to nervous/anxious/scared. And if you get there and you realize God is not calling you to that place, then the visit has still been beneficial - you'll know to strike that place from your list and look elsewhere. Go in peace to love and serve the Lord.
  7. 6 points
    beatitude

    Feeling called, but not qualified?

    Following your vocation won't make you perfect overnight...but it will make it easier for you to live up to your better self. This is because what's best in that way of life resonates with what's best in you. If just the idea of being a sister makes you feel more at home in yourself, that's a pretty good indication that you need to persevere in your search. I will pray for you. I think you will get better advice from your spiritual director than anything we can give, as they know the specifics of your situation. However, I will suggest this: make sure you are always honest with yourself. When we think that we're incapable of doing something, or when we're a bit frightened of doing something, it gets easy to sabotage ourselves, to make sure we can't do it. Is there a possibility that this is happening in your case? I have a disability that affects the coordination in my hands, and I am a candidate with a congregation that lives by manual work - cleaning, factory labour, that kind of thing. For a long time I thought this precluded me from their life (and so did they). But as we got to know one another better, and we saw how my own spirituality matches and is nurtured by theirs, they offered to let me live in so that we could discover a way forward together. The suggestion made me so happy (I was moved almost to tears) but at the same time quite nervous. I'm in a job that suits me and I'm used to being seen as a capable person. How would it feel to be bad at so many of the things the sisters do? It puts me in a vulnerable position. But this is an invitation to trust in God. "His power is made perfect in weakness." Letting go of worries about your apparent lack of qualifications really just means holding our your hands to God, so that he can give you what you need.
  8. 5 points
    beatitude

    For a Homeless Lady

    Please pray for a young homeless woman, K., who often begs outside the minimarket near me. She has a history of drug and alcohol abuse, but with the help of AA and a support worker, she's managing to stay away from these things. However, this means she's pretty isolated - she finds it difficult to socialise with other homeless people as many of them drink and it's too much of a temptation for her to be around alcohol, especially if it's cold weather and she wants to comfort herself. Please pray for her to be given strength and for her to find housing soon. We may have located an accommodation project that meets her needs and can take her in. Please also pray for me to be given wisdom and trust. I've been helping her out a bit (she sometimes asks me for things she needs, like socks or sanitary towels, and once or twice I've brought her sweater home to launder it). She's never unreasonable in what she asks, and I think she's a truthful person. However, the culture of suspicion around homeless people is such that occasionally I doubt her story and wonder if she's just taking me for a ride, even though a few pairs of clean socks and some sanitary pads and very small amounts of money are hardly going to break the bank. Please pray for me never to lose sight of Christ in her and to always know the right thing to do.
  9. 5 points
    OnlySunshine

    Super Excited!

    I received some very exciting news this week that I've been admitted to a university to study Zoology! I was kind of concerned because, although I have a Bachelor degree already and received excellent grades, my grades in the past were not great due to all sorts of health issues - especially anxiety. However, when I received the news, I was over the moon and am so happy to begin this journey! This is something I've wanted to do for MANY years but was honestly too afraid because I was concerned that I wouldn't do well with science and math. My mom kept reminding me that I am smart enough and I just need to "bite the bullet" and do what I love otherwise I'll regret it. I will need to move 2 hours from home so I'm looking at housing options. Please keep in your prayers as I will be starting the program in Fall 2018 but I will be taking a prerequisite course over the summer at a junior college to meet my math requirements (Pre-Calculus).
  10. 5 points
    NadaTeTurbe

    For my students and me

    Would you please pray for my students that have their french oral this week ? Specially one young lady who is so anxious ! And if you can say a prayer so I'm accepted for my master degree in my city, and that I am accepted in an appartment for disabled students in my city, it would be great !
  11. 5 points
    TheresaThoma

    Question for youth entering very strict Orders

    (Note: I have not yet entered religious life but I am seriously discerning and have friends that have entered.) I am seriously discerning with a community that could be considered strict (a contemplative order). If I end up entering I will not have home visits but my family can come visit me. This is a bit of a sacrifice but in some ways this would be more consistent than how often I get to see my family now due to work and such. Through my contact with various communities I have noticed that sometimes the personal time is tucked into or may be somewhat hidden in the schedule. For example with the community that I am discerning with there is some personal time listed in the schedule but there are other "pockets" of time plus what is not listed is that Sundays are basically free days (the necessary tasks like cooking, dishes, phone/door are on a rotating basis on Sundays). So outside of prayers and meals you can choose to spend that time with other Sisters or by yourself. I spent three months there on a live-in visit and sometimes certain parts of the life were difficult. The schedule overall is demanding but personally I found that I had better and more consistent sleeping and eating habits at the abbey than on my own. I think what many young women, myself included, see in these strict communities is distinctiveness, being set apart as a sign pointing to the things that are eternal. There is a strong desire for the support of a community and respect for traditions. In my time with the community it was beautiful to realize that what and how I was doing that day had roots that go back centuries (it is a Benedictine community). There is the sense of connection, which made everyday tasks richer. There is also a sense of security with these communities that some may see as strict. The practices and ways of life go back decades (if not centuries) and have changed very little and the community is still thriving today. If a young woman is looking at committing her life to something she wants to be relatively sure that it will still be in existence 40, 50, 60 or even 70 years from now. Even though the young women entering today did not see the immediate after effects of the confusion after Vatican II the effects are still evident. The question consciously or subconsciously arises, "what helped this community survive and thrive whereas others are dying out?" I have seen with some communities that are dying out they have in some ways lost what made them distinct. The Sisters live on their own, they don't have communal prayer, they have vastly different apostlates from their Sisters. There isn't much connectedness to the community or sometimes even the charism. This doesn't look much different from how a devout young woman can live today without being a part of that type community. So for many young women they see those communities and think "why should I join that community? I'm doing that already". Those that kept more with their own tradition and identity even if the practices seem a bit too strict are still here. Finding that balance between tradition and renewal (and practicality) is hard but very necessary and some of the "strict" communities have proved that they can find that balance. The community I am discerning with was founded from another abbey (which traces back its origins to the early 1000s) over 80 years ago, there is a strong sense of tradition while being flexible which gives a sense of security that there is a good chance the community will still be in existence for another 80 or more years. I do agree that there has to be a balance otherwise the strictness will become unhealthy. Also what may be too strict for one person may be perfect for someone else. With regards to devotions I have friends who are part of communities with communal devotions. I can see that is something very life giving for them personally but it also helps bind the community together because that devotion is an expression of the charism. In some cases it would be very odd not to have a particular devotion if it is part of their spirituality or charism. Again a community could possibly have "too many" devotions. Personally I'm not into lots of communal devotions and so I may look at the different prayers that a community has and think it is way too much but someone who is called to that community may just see that as how the community expresses its charism.
  12. 5 points
    Totus Tuus Maria

    Prayers for telling family about entering!

    Hi Sr! Yes I have been in touch with them (the vocation director) for awhile and I will have a two week stay in the early summer and based on how that goes I may wait or decide to enter. They have already offered for me to apply and said it was ok if I felt like I needed to wait as well.
  13. 4 points
    TheresaThoma

    Prayers for telling family about entering!

    Something that helped my family a bit was being able to meet the Sisters. My family was very much against my vocation. My mom has gone from open hostile opposition to resigned acceptance (MAJOR change). I think what helped her in part was being able to meet a few of the Sisters. I did a live in this past summer and at the end I got permission for my mom, sister, and nephew) to come up earlier in the afternoon on the day they picked me up. They were there for midday prayers and had lunch and I was able show them around a bit. I think this helped my mom because in meeting the Sisters they became just "normal people" not this scary group of strangers. My mom did find it funny how many of the Sisters wanted to see my nephew (who was 1 at the time). That helped break the ice a bit. I know it is still difficult for her but the visit helped. So maybe at the end of your two week visit your dad and/or sister could come and meet the Sisters. Another thing that really helped was me sharing about the parts of the life they could understand (my family is not Catholic or even really religious). I got a phone call home once a month during the 3 months I was there. I focused on sharing the funny and beautiful parts; the normal day in and day out stuff. Overall I think hearing and seeing me "in context" helped them so much because they could tell I am happy there.
  14. 4 points
    Sponsa-Christi

    What Happens When Nuns/sisters Leave The Order?

    Honestly, though, continuing with this analogy I think divorced people actually would have some decent insights into the current state of marriage in our culture today. Would their experiences alone tell you the full story of what marriage is and could be? No, of course not. But the stories of the divorced could still give some valuable insights as to the challenges married people might face, or why so many marriages today fail. Even though there are still lots of good Sisters and healthy communities out there, I think it's beyond obvious that SOMETHING happened to religious life in general in the decades immediately following Vatican II. The recollections of negative or confusing experiences that religious or those discerning religious life had at the time are just as valid (and even helpful to us) as the more positive stories that others might have.
  15. 4 points
    Sponsa-Christi

    What Happens When Nuns/sisters Leave The Order?

    Actually, I'm good friends with several older religious who have shared very similar reflections to those that gloriana35 has shared. Obviously one poster's experiences aren't universal, but I think gloriana was hitting on some very real and valid points.
  16. 4 points
    beatitude

    For a homeless lady

    Over the past month or so I've been getting to know a homeless woman, K., who often begs outside the minimarket near me. We've had some quite long chats. Tonight she told me that sometimes she feels so unwanted and unloved, and that she wonders if anyone would even notice if she was gone. She's been on the street for two years. I'm trying to find some proper help for her via local homelessness charities and through church. Please pray that she gets a place to live soon, that God will help her to understand that she is loved, and that she can fulfil her dream to be a youth worker.
  17. 4 points
    Francis Clare

    Religious life or not?

    I feel I must come to the defense of Nunsuch. If you really knew her, her background, education, experience, affiliation/s, the scholarly articles, etc. she's written and published on RL perhaps you might change your mind :)) This is a woman with a depth of knowledg, experience, and connections that I could only hope to have in my little finger :)) Such is the beauty and the scourge of the Internet - we DON"T really know each other, we CAN'T hear the vocal nuancess or OBSERVE facial expressions or body language in replies, which in most cases makes it difficult to know the true context of those replies. After being on this Phorum for several years - and having more than a few years of doing spiritual direction as well as working in other ministries in the Church, I see a pattern here that's reared it's head many times before. A member replies to a post in good faith, the original poster takes offense (for whatever reason) to the reply, then the mud starts getting flung about. Words such as condescending and insulting come from the mindset of the tosser. Something else is going on that we are not privy to, nor should we be. Someone who has posted a total of 1 time throws shade on a well-respected long-time poster sends up a red flag to me. I didn't read anywhere where Nunsuch was discourage joining young, flourishing orders. Nor did I find her comments "condescending and insulting". Quite the opposite. Discernment does not end the moment one crosses over the doorstep of the convent/monastery. DIscerment, on the behalf of both parties (both the young woman and the community) goes on right up until the moment one is solemnly/perpetually professed. It's not just a "phase" one goes through before making a decision to enter or not. I have met with many women in my years as a SD- both those going into the convent and those coming out (whether of their own volition or if they were asked to leave). Yes, the issues of "feelings"and "likes" comes up, but they are not the only things nor are they the important ones I must add that we grapple with. Without starting a firestorm, I will leave it at that.
  18. 3 points
    Totus Tuus Maria

    Prayers for telling family about entering!

    Thank you again all for your prayers and suggestions Dad is still very upset, as I'm sure he will be for awhile but I'm hopeful he will come around. I like the idea of him visiting and seeing the sisters. I think my sister will like that idea too. The order I am discerning with is an international apostolic order that doesn't fall into one of the traditional branches. Praying for you all
  19. 3 points
    Pax17

    House Hunting

    My brother and sister-in-law are on the verge of homelessness after going through illness and job loss. My husband and I have decided to buy a house and let our family live in it. Would you please pray that we find a suitable, reasonably priced home quickly...my brother's situation is deteriorating rapidly. Thank you.
  20. 3 points
    BarbaraTherese

    Boundary issue/Giving Thanks

    Back on the 2nd April I asked prayer for my front boundary issue. My Housing Manager called on 10.4.18 and the boundary has been decided and as I was hoping. I really am very happy about this and totally grateful as it had been an issue for years that my previous landlord had been avoiding. I had been stressing out about the boundary and the visit on the 10th April and stressing out big time. That stress has now gone. It also means that I can now confidently plan out a front garden and it will be a case of less is more. That means that my garden on all sides is complete and is an easy care garden with most plants drought tolerant. My Housing Manager has also addressed the issue of my problem neighbours either side and without upsetting anyone at all. Her decision about my front boundary does mean that it is a fair and just decision both for my next door neighbour and me. Joy all round! Thank you so much for prayer. I had been praying to Our Lady Untier of Knots as I knew I was all tied up in knots big time over the issue. Deo Gratius.
  21. 3 points
    Kayte Postle

    Kayte Discerns (An Ongoing Journey)

    Had a great talk with the VD a few days ago. I got along great with the VD, and it really felt like this community is a good fit. It's like the Lord had everything I want in a community (and more) just there waiting for me. So far they are ok with my mental health needs, and are willing to continue discerning with me. They are having a few other discerners visiting with them in a few weeks, and I have some time off around the same time. I just have to find a way to pay for the plane ticket out there! Please pray that if it is the Lord's will that I will be able to make it to visit, and that the money to get there will appear. Also had a really encouraging talk with my SD a few days ago as well. He really is a great priest, and gave me some really good practical advice to help overcome some of my more serious sin struggles. God is just moving in really great ways right now, and I'm just really joyful!
  22. 3 points
    MikMowse

    We've Gone Public!

    Congratulations to Sr (DR) Sophie on her completion of her doctorate degree. If you click on the photo it will take you to the full article and many photos on FB.
  23. 3 points
    Anastasia (L&T)

    For friends

    A friend is going through a lot right now. Please pray for her. Another friend could use some healing from a bad injury that has lasted a while.
  24. 3 points
    AveMariaPurissima

    2018 - Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    Sr. Mary Daniela, O.P. made her first profession this past Saturday at Mt. Thabor Monastery in Ortonville, MI. Many pictures of the celebration on the community's Facebook page.
  25. 3 points
    BarbaraTherese

    Boundary Issue

    For the past five years I have been trying to get my housing authority to tell me where my front boundary is. My Housing Manager calls on the 9th April and that, hopefully, will decide the issue and finalize it. In the meantime, bipolar is being really difficult. I saw my psychiatrist last Thursday and she acknowledged I was stressing but did feel I was coping ok without an increase in medication - Deo Gratius, a decided plus. A prayer please that the boundary is settled for all time on the 9th. and my stress level will come back to normal. At the moment, my bipolar mind under stress is being relentlessly and obstinately obsessive. Daily prayer for all in this forum. Since coming back from interstate on 13th March, I am still struggling to catch up with everything, eventually I will. Deo Gratius - Laudate Dominum.
  26. 3 points
    Andrea Marie

    The Unspeakable: Suicide

    I’m the dinosaur breaking out of the egg where it’s been very very dark. Just memorialized the 2 yr mark when I lost my dear, talented, loving son. I had to hatch at some point. Easter seems to be an appropriate time. So many questions never answered. But Easter is a good time. Does anyone know what I’m talking about?
  27. 3 points
    Antigonos

    Happy Holidays!

    Wishing the Jews [anyone besides myself lurking in a corner?] on the forum a happy and kosher Pesach, and the Christians a Happy Easter. It's going to be a busy couple of weeks here -- this year Pesach Eve falls tonight [Friday], and this year it is also Good Friday for Latin Christians; Latin Christians celebrate Easter on Sunday, this coming Friday, a week from now, the Greek Orthodox begin their three-day Easter celebrations. And the Armenian Christians have yet another date. About the only major religion in this part of the world [Jerusalem] which doesn't have a holiday right now is Islam.
  28. 3 points
    CatherineM

    Prayers for telling family about entering!

    Difficult topics with family members are never easy. Take it slow and expect strong emotions.
  29. 3 points
    28yrolddiscerner

    Vocation and low spiritedness

    I’m starting to give up on my consecrated vocation even though I believe Jesus is calling me. Please pray for perseverance! And that I find the right community. Ty
  30. 3 points
    Nunsuch

    Religious life or not?

    Again, you seem very young. There is a huge difference between talking constantly about what you "feel" and "like" and "want" and claiming that I'm suggesting that the only alternative is feeling "miserable" and "wretched." What I said is not "harmful," but your tendency to misread may be. Again, you really might want to consider that people with more experience and training than you might actually know something you do not. However, I give up. I've tried to make helpful suggestions, but you appear determined to misinterpret and to see only what you want to see in what others say. So I wish you luck. You will need it. But I will not engage here further.
  31. 2 points
    OnlySunshine

    Pray for My Inner Peace

    Things have been pretty crazy this week. Last week, I found out I was accepted to the school I applied to study Zoology so I got right on registering for orientation and getting all my immunization records together to clear the holds so I could register for classes. Since the school is 2 hours away from my hometown, housing is a necessity and, for what ever reason, I found out this week that no housing is available on-campus and the housing affiliates off-campus are full, as well. Of course, the housing that was available was in a large metro area that is about an hour away from the school and I did not want to commute back and forth. It's too expensive, also. Because of this and the fact that I was really confused about what to do, I held off telling my mom because I was trying to see if there was anything else available. I was coming up empty. On another note, I met with a friend from Church yesterday who is a licensed clinical social worker. She works as a Christian counselor (she is Catholic but she works with all Christians) and loves her job. Our personalities are very similar and we started talking about my job search and how I was not sure if the Zoology degree was the right move because I'm starting from scratch, literally, and it will take so much time and money. I have a tendency to overthink things so I thought it was just my normal doubt creeping in. However, since finding out that housing is not available, it made me realize that, again, things happen for a reason. I haven't seen this friend a really long time and we just happened to meet the week that I was having doubts about what my career should be. My grandmother, who is always supportive, expressed pretty big doubts herself about how I would pay for things without going into debt and how long it would take to complete school before I was doing something I love. I felt, personally, like I was going into it blindly. It's not like me to do something so unorthodox and I think that's what made me hesitate - with good reason. Anyway, I talked for a good hour with my friend about her job and just realized that I need to pursue something that is more in tune with what I've done in the past, which is health care, and something that won't take so long to complete before I can start working in that career. Let's be honest, I am about to be 35 in July and I'm not in a position to make spur-of-the-moment decisions. For whatever reason, I became impulsive and the brakes were put on me. My friend gave me a contact of hers that works at the school she attended for her MSW and I also found more information online about the program. It will require me to take the GRE test (ugh!) but I really think the Master's program is the way to go. My friend reminded me how versatile social work is - you can work in several different settings. I need prayers please. I am glad that I met with this friend. I was considering being a counselor when I was still at my last job because my supervisor and a few other co-workers said I had the personality to work in social work. I'm very empathetic and resourceful. I also love animals. I told my friend that I was interested in acquiring and training a Golden Retriever as a therapy dog and she reminded me that equine therapy helps so much, too. I have loved horses ever since I was 3 years old, so I'd love doing that.
  32. 2 points
    DameAgnes

    Interview w/Sr. Lucia Marie, Passionist nun

    https://www.passionistnuns.org/blog/2018/4/12/interview-with-sr-lucia-marie-family
  33. 2 points
    Egeria

    Cloister? Not cloistered?

    I'm afraid I don't understand your reasoning. I am neither defending nor attacking Aquinas, but to dismiss his influence strikes me as silly. The categorisation of religious as either contemplative or apostolic had a major influence on women religious in later centuries. In particular, it had serious consequences for monastic women who were forced into categories that were not really appropriate for them. (The same thing happened to monastic men, but with less obvious consequences because of the enclosure thing). But it also had serious consequences for women earlier than that in that the rise of the second order mendicants created a new sort of hybrid religious who had a dual identity (part monastic and part Dominican, Franciscan, etc.) that was specifically feminine - and aspects of this (enclosure, bridal imagery, the notion of "contemplative", just read Verbi Sponsa) have been imposed on women in the earlier monastic tradition for whom it is not really appropriate.
  34. 2 points
    CatherineM

    98 y.o. nun goes to the sweet 16

    Being a nun doesn’t mean you have to have a boring life.
  35. 2 points
    beatitude

    For my students and my friend

    I would like to ask prayers for my final-year undergraduate students as they prepare their last assignment for my class. Please pray for J in particular. He copied an article from the Internet and turned it in as his coursework, and next week we will both have to attend a misconduct committee hearing. It's possible that he will not be allowed to graduate. No matter what the committee decides, pray that he learns from this experience and is honest from now on. Then there is my PhD student: she's working so hard, but a close friend of hers died very suddenly from cancer and she is struggling to cope with both her studies and the grief. Pray for the repose of her friend's soul and for her to be comforted. Lastly, pray for my friend W. He is a relatively new friend and colleague, and he happened to drop by on a day when I was struggling with PTSD. I am not open about having experienced trauma beyond a small circle of extremely close friends, and I worry he may have found me cold and standoffish when really I was just anxious and not able to pay much attention to what he was saying. Please pray that he will be able to overlook anything awkward or abrupt in my behaviour.
  36. 2 points
    NunMother

    Great Vocation Brochure

    This Passionist Vocation Brochure is so good. It deserves its own thread! https://www.passionistnuns.org/blog/2018/4/7/a-vocation-brochure-of-a-different-sort
  37. 2 points
    BarbaraTherese

    Thank you

    Deo Gratius. My boundary issue has been decided after all these years and decided as I hoped. At last too, I have authoritative signed images of where the boundary is. Thank you very much for prayer. I was stressed out to the max and at last the stress is easing off and I am very grateful too that an episode of bipolar has not resulted - extremely grateful as I try to catch up with various matters needing attention. Prayer too for all requests in this forum. Laudate Dominum
  38. 2 points
    beatitude

    Passionist nuns UK

    There have been a few threads about the Passionists lately, especially the nuns at Whitesville in Kentucky, and for the sake of UK-based women I wanted to mention that we do have a small monastery of Passionist nuns in England. They used to be in the Midlands, but their monastery got too big and unmanageable for the community, so last year the remaining nuns moved to a small purpose-built monastery in the grounds of Minsteracres, a retreat centre run by Passionist priests in Northumberland (which is how I found out about the nuns - I sometimes go there for quiet days). The monastery is named after Our Lady of Holy Hope. The sisters are hoping that vocations will come, so please pray for them, and if you live in the UK and are interested in monastic religious life, look them up.
  39. 2 points
    cappie

    Pope Francis:striving for holiness in today’s world

    Why did the Pope write this Exhortation, and why now? Helping people to be holy is one of the Church’s main tasks, in every era. The Second Vatican Council spoke of the “universal call to holiness”. Pope Francis has written not an academic or doctrinal text, but an apostolic exhortation whose goal is “to repropose the call to holiness in a practical way for our own time.” It is an invitation to a journey that takes place in the concrete here and now of our daily lives, in small gestures and little things, in which we are led more and more by God’s grace. In Evangelii Gaudium, Pope Francis spoke of the call to all the faithful to be missionary disciples; Gaudete et Exsultate is about the mission at the heart of that call, which is to be in relationship with Jesus Christ, who stirs our desire for holiness and enables us, by his power rather than ours, to get there. Holiness is for all of us, not a select few. He wants us to know that it is our destiny; it’s what God has planned for us; and yet there is nothing intimidating or overpowering about it; rather it is a liberation, a way of becoming who we really are. https://cvcomment.org/2018/04/09/pope-francis-writes-to-each-one-of-us-about-holiness-in-todays-world/
  40. 2 points
    cappie

    Pope’s Apostolic Exhortation on holiness: a summary

    This summary of the Apostolic Exhortation GAUDETE ET EXSULTATE of the Holy Father Pope Francis on the call to holiness in today’s world has been distributed to journalists today by the Holy See. https://cvcomment.org/2018/04/09/popes-apostolic-exhortation-on-holiness-a-summary/
  41. 2 points
    Francis Clare

    Great Catholic Sisters And Priests Movies

    I find watching the older movies depicting RL very difficult as they are usually too "sappy" (depicting RL in an unrealistic manner , everything is sunshine,roses, and fairly immature postulants and novices giggling as they waltz through the convent hallways ) or to0 much on the "dark side" (depicting RL as it MIGHT have been at one time, but highly sensationalized). Once again I have to agree with Nunsuch on Dead Man Walking - she and I are very similar in our backgrounds and understanding/interaction with those currently in RL. Just my random thoughts before I have my coffee and biscotti
  42. 2 points
    TheresaThoma

    Introvert in a Convent

    I am also discerning with a cloistered community and I spent three months living in the cloister. I found the whole spectrum of personalities in that community. There definitely is some give and take in the community. For example understanding that the more introverted and shy Sister is going to have a harder time at recreation and to perhaps just let her talk with one or two other Sisters rather then try to bring her into a big group conversation. Also understanding that for a more extroverted Sister working silently will be challenging. Also the amount of interaction (group recreation, communal work etc) definitely varies from community to community. I'm slightly introverted for me being around people is like a sugar high. I sometimes have difficulties in group settings and can get really tense. I have been meeting with a counselor, at the suggestion of the community, for a few different things I need help working on. One of the things that we have worked on is techniques for helping me not feel so tense and anxious in group settings. Things I can do in the moment but also looking at if there were some subconscious things going on that contributed to this. Perhaps this might be something for you to consider exploring as well. I'm definitely not saying that being introverted is bad but just to have some tools that when you start feeling overwhelemed you can manage a bit better. With regards to the priest's comment I think your intuition is right. Feeling "at home" with a community doesn't mean that you are just going to instantly feel comfortable there. I definitely feel at home with the community I am discerning with but there was also a good bit of nervousness and being uncomfortable especially at the beginning of my three month live-in. The feeling of "being at home" was more of having the desire that despite feeling uncomfortable right now that you could really feel comfortable in that setting and wanting to work on overcoming that discomfort. Communities definitely expects discerners to be a bit nervous or shy, this is normal. I think spending the month with the community will give you a much better idea of if their life and if you are called to be there. God Bless and I will be praying for you!
  43. 2 points
    NunMother

    New Passionist Nuns' Website

    New Passionist Nuns' Website The Passionist Nuns in Whitesville, KY launched their new website today! Enjoy!
  44. 2 points
    Luigi

    Passionist Monastery - Newspaper Article

    Here's an article from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch about the Passionist monastery in Ellisville, MO (a suburb of St. Louis). I assume the writer is not Catholic based on the fact that the terminology is slightly inaccurate (or misspelled). But anyone considering contemplative life may find the article informative. http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/metro/life-in-the-cloister-st-louis-county-passionist-convent-is/article_e3e8979b-ca81-5800-98ec-51ba7d3e3588.html#tracking-source=home-top-story-1
  45. 2 points
    Sister Leticia

    Prayers for telling family about entering!

    That's good. It's just that you hadn't said this in your opening post, hence my concern. But if you're going to have a two week stay in a couple of months' time, then yes, you do need to start preparing your family for that, as well as the possibility of you entering sometime after.
  46. 2 points
    Pax17

    2018 - Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    Earlier this year, two postulants became novices at St. Scholastica Priory: http://stscholasticapriory.org/vocation-blog/sr-maria-mechtilde/ http://stscholasticapriory.org/vocation-blog/sr-martha/
  47. 2 points
    Antigonos

    Religious life or not?

    Somehow, I hear a lot of anger here. Whether or not I would agree with Nunsuch, I think my response would be openly "thank you for your input" and think privately whatever I chose to think rather than lash out. And this isn't the first post where you've indicated that what you seem to want is confirmation of your own views rather than a realistic appraisal of the situation. The truth seems to be that many, if not most, communities are coping with smaller numbers of young vocations than in the past, and consequently have larger percentages of elderly sisters, many of whom need assistance or even nursing. When I look at photos, I see lots of older nuns in motorized wheelchairs, for example. It may seem naive to others, but it seems to me that one enters a community for one's own interior life primarily, not for social aspects. I know it was fiction, and was set in the 1920s and '30s, but one of the major struggles for the protagonist of "The Nun's Story" [the most intimate view of religious life I know] was "detachment". It was all too easy to form, or want to form, attachments with other sisters. May I ask if you have living grandparents? How do you relate to them? Do you find them interesting or boring? Can you see yourself as part of a chain stretching through generations or are the elderly simply impediments, especially if they are disabled in some way? Even if you found a community where, say, the average age of the sisters was 15-20 years older than you -- which today is not really much of a gap, it would be an increasing gap as time passes. If you are 20 today, I'm sure someone of 35 doesn't seem ancient; but when you are 50, and she is 65, or if the age gap is even wider, you would feel rather differently toward a new 20 year old postulant, and she, about you.
  48. 2 points
    DameAgnes

    SURPRISE! Secular publications talking about vocations

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/acts-of-faith/wp/2018/03/17/urging-middle-schoolers-to-consider-the-convent-do-i-want-to-marry-joe-blow-or-do-i-want-to-marry-jesus-christ/?utm_term=.5571027a7501
  49. 2 points
    Nunsuch

    Religious life or not?

    kateritekakwitha, religious life is really not about how you "feel." That is an emotional and, in the end, rather limited and superficial response. Religious life is a call from God, and may or may not reflect "feeling." You seem to be relatively new to the whole question of what religious life is. Others, Like Sister Leticia, have lived it for years and really ARE in a position to indicate what it is, what it is not, and what factors go into discerning a valid call. Please remember, as the first pinned post on this page reminds us all, that "vocation is not about you." It is not centered on self, on what you might "like" or "feel." For someone who has not lived the life, you seem to have very absolute and certain ideas. Part of religious formation, remember, is about learning that you may not always be right.
  50. 2 points
    Luigi

    2018 - Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    Three postulants admitted to the novitiate at St. Bernard's Abbey (Cullman, Alabama). If you know any prayers, send 'em up for these guys. St. Bernard's has received 16 vocations since 2001 - and now another three, assuming all three persevere.
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