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    little2add

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    dominicansoul

    Church Militant


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    DameAgnes

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    Ash Wednesday

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/22/2018 in all areas

  1. 5 points
    KyleDeWolf1985

    Angelic Warfare Confraternity

    I decided to apply for the Angelic Warfare Confraternity [http://www.angelicwarfareconfraternity.org/], which is an apostolate of the Dominican Friars. I received a medal and a cord to wear, but now I have to find a Dominican priest or a priest authorized by the Dominican Order to receive me into the confraternity in order to be blessed. It doesn't look like there are any Dominicans in my region. I called a local priest, who advised me to contact the diocese. Then I left a message with the diocesan office and sent them an email. I'm not sure what else to do. I started praying 15 Hail Mary's for purity every day. St. Thomas Aquinas is the patron saint of the confraternity, and I happen to like his philosophy in many ways (I feel that it can be updated to accommodate modern science without sacrificing its core principles). I want to focus especially on purity of heart and intercession for others facing temptation, so that God will reward me with the gift of chastity.
  2. 5 points
    Sister Leticia

    Should someone with mental illness give up on being a nun?

    To add to some of the points made by Antigonos about the difference in "manageability" between mental and physical health problems: I regularly see posts here re the cost of medical treatment and insurance, as if cost is the only factor in a community's decision. And - for those of you in the US or other countries with a similar health system - it may well be something to consider, but it is not the only/primary factor. Here in the UK, where we have free or low cost healthcare thanks to the National Health Service, we also screen candidates for possible health needs, physical and psychological. Why? Because candidates need to have sufficient health, stamina, resilience and stability to be able to live the life: to be part of the community's mission if apostolic (which could include full-time ministry and/or study, maybe plus extra things in the parish or for the community), to live the demands of community, to be able to live joyfully in enclosure (if monastic), and any fasting or other physical austerity, to embrace the vows, and any consequent asceticism and so on. Within this, it's quite feasible that some communities, because of their particular vocation, might have more stringent requirements than others. For example, a missionary order whose members could well be sent to remote, challenging outposts, with only very basic healthcare, might say they can't accept candidates whose health depends on daily medication, regular check ups, avoiding certain activities and so on. A condition which is perfectly manageable in a major city in a developed country, might be perilous in much less developed environments. So congregation A might be able to accept candidates with allergies, thyroid problems, bad backs etc, whereas congregation B might not. But considerations around mental health can be even more crucial and stringent - as Antigonos has explained. Entering religious life can be stressful. Remaining, and flourishing, is a great grace, but it is by no means easy. It isn't enough simply to want to live the life, or even to feel you're being called - you've actually got to be able to live it, and to grow and to thrive in it.
  3. 5 points
    Antigonos

    Should someone with mental illness give up on being a nun?

    I have been wanting, for a long time, to make a comment about the often-raised topic of what sort of medical conditions can affect discernment, but since I'm neither Catholic nor a discerner, I've been hesitant to do so. I am, however, a nurse and something of an observer for at least 55 of my 72 years. So...please take whatever is below as possible food for thought, nothing more. There's a difference between a chronic physical medical condition and mental health issues, and I think the difference is very important. A chronic condition such as diabetes or hyper/hypothyroidism can mean lifelong medication BUT it can be controlled successfully. Whether a community can undertake the expenses involved, even with good medical insurance, is another issue. These can be considerable, not only medications but special diets, therapy, etc. so every community will have its own policy. [A diabetic, for example, can be well controlled but will need testing equipment and supplies even if she manages to maintain a good blood sugar level on diet alone]. But when the problem is related to mental health, it can be rather more complicated. For starters, is the mental situation related to the desire to fulfill a vocation, or in spite of it? Would the stresses -- very different from living on one's own "in the world" -- increase or the raised spiritual level of being with a community help relieve the problem? Does one need constant medication, therapy, monitoring? Is the community capable of dealing with an individual who may have periodic exacerbations of the mental problem? Let's face it, religious are not primarily psychologists, even if they have experience in human relations and shrewdness. A person who, for example, is bipolar, may not demonstrate obvious symptoms when "swinging" one way or the other until it is well advanced, and neither s/he nor her sisters [or brothers, as the case might be] might pick up impending signs. This obviously would increase tensions even when everyone wants to be supportive, being apprehensive that something could veer out of control. It seems to me that, without exaggerating one's health difficulties, it is important to be open about them once one is seriously discerning with a community, and from my POV, I think a live-in of considerable length is helpful for both the discerner and the community, perhaps even more so than if the discerner is in good physical and mental health. If a community says it cannot accept someone who suffers from a significant problem, the discerner needs to understand that she's not "beyond hope", but that the search might take longer, to get a good "match", and in the meantime, try to work with a spiritual director to enrich his/her spiritual life. It seems to me that there's a "right" place for everyone, although it sometimes takes quite a while to find it.
  4. 4 points
    dominicansoul

    Eye Surgery Canceled

    LC couldn't have surgery today like she had wanted! Her eye is still swollen a bit, so the doctors will have to wait. Please continue to pray for her at this time.
  5. 4 points
    dominicansoul

    Eye Surgery

    Sr. Catherine, aka "LC" will be having eye surgery tomorrow! Please pray for her, that there will be no complications, and for success!
  6. 3 points
    Sponsa-Christi

    First thoughts on ESI

    Hi all, I always feel a bit awkward linking to my own blog, but I recently finished writing up an overview on the new Instruction on CVs, Ecclesiae Sponsae Imago: https://sponsa-christi.blogspot.com/2018/09/a-first-look-at-ecclesiae-sponsae-imago.html Apart from the one controversial issue of ESI 88, not much has been written on this document yet, so I thought this might be of interest to some people here.
  7. 3 points
    little2add

    Prayer for the Unborn Child

    Almighty God, our Father, you who have given us life and intended us to have it forever, grant us your blessings. Enlighten our minds to an awareness and to a renewed conviction that all human life is sacred because it is created in your image and likeness. Help us to teach by word and the example of our lives that life occupies the first place, that human life is precious because it is the gift of God whose love is infinite. Give us the strength to defend human life against every influence or action that threatens or weakens it, as well as the strength to make every life more human in all its aspects. Give us the grace... When the sacredness of life before birth is attacked, to stand up and proclaim that no one ever has the authority to destroy unborn life. When a child is described as a burden or is looked upon only as a means to satisfy an emotional need, to stand up and insist that every child is a unique and unrepeatable gift of God, a gift of God with a right to a loving and united family. When the institution of marriage is abandoned to human selfishness or reduced to a temporary conditional arrangement that can easily be terminated, to stand up and affirm the indissolubility of the marriage bond. When the value of the family is threatened because of social and economic pressure, to stand up and reaffirm that the family is necessary not only for the private good of every person, but also for the common good of every society, nation and state. When freedom is used to dominate the weak, to squander natural resources and energy, to deny basic necessities to people, to stand up and affirm the demands of justice and social love. Almighty Father, give us courage to proclaim the supreme dignity of all human life and to demand that society itself give its protection. We ask this in your name, through the redemptive act of your Son and in the Holy Spirit. Amen.
  8. 3 points
    little2add

    the carpenters prayer

  9. 3 points
    Seven77

    Spirit of Truth Novena – Sept. 29 to Oct. 7

    Today, the Feast of the Holy Archangels, is the beginning of a novena being promoted by the Confraternity of Angelic Warfare. Pray a rosary and offer sacrifices for nine days for The Spirit of Truth to descend upon the Church and the world..
  10. 3 points
    KyleDeWolf1985

    Returning to the Catholic Faith

    This year, I decided to return to the Catholic Church after a hiatus of several years. When I was a teenager, I converted to the Catholic Church because I felt that I needed a stronger moral compass in life. My peers seemed completely lost, and the fundamentalist religion of my relatives seemed completely off-kilter. Yet I could relate to the simple preaching of the gospel and the wonderful simplicity and sublime elegance of the sacraments in the country parishes around my home. It really spoke to me beyond words. I was baptized at age 11 and confirmed at age 18. I loved RCIA so much that I went three years in a row, 16, 17, 18. It was the first time that I could really sit down with adults as an equal and be respected for my intelligence. After I joined the military and became exposed to the corruption and violence of the world, it really shook my faith and caused me to drift away from the Catholic faith. The simple platitudes of Catholicism no longer seemed relevant to the realities of the modern world. I gave into temptation, sin, unbelief, and doubt. However, I quickly found that I was lost without God. I made terrible choices on my own. I was in a lot of mental anguish. For a while, I tried to espouse the liberal, humanistic versions of Christianity as a substitute: Unitarianism, Quakerism, Episcopalianism, Congregationalism, etc. However, I began to sense that Liberal Christianity is a hollow construct. I gave up in disgust when a local Unitarian minister preached a sermon, saying, "I'm not here to tell you what to believe. I'm here for you to tell me what you believe." Despite it's boasting an impressive record of social activism and volunteerism, I don't really need to be a member of a church to participate in community life or take a stand on political debates. It's not enough of a reason to get up early on a Sunday and drive 40 minutes to church when you can barely afford to pay for gas. I need answers. I understand that some people feel that they can be virtuous on their own without God, but some of us need a little more help. It is not the healthy who need a Doctor, but the sick (Matthew 9:12). I had an epiphany of late that even though many teachings of Catholicism may seem questionable to the human intellect, based on the standards and ideals of the times in which we live, and even though the purpose of many rituals and ceremonies may seem obscure, there might still be a deeper spiritual reason for it that you may not understand. Even doing something that seems pointless, like abstaining from meat on a Friday, might have real spiritual value. It's like practicing self-denial, and in today's world it means facing constant arguments and embarrassment over whether it makes any difference at all, so that we will be better prepared to overcome real sins and addictions in the face of peer pressure and sophistry. It's disciplining yourself in the way of penance and perseverance. I also made my way back to Phatmass, which I thought was so cool when I was a young Catholic. I'm glad to see that it's still here. It's a great reminder that the Catholic Church will always be here until the end of time, and maybe for eternity if you include the communion of saints. No matter how far you stray, you can always come back to God.
  11. 3 points
    little2add

    What is your favorite thing?

    Watching my grandkids ( there so precious)
  12. 2 points
    Anya

    Returning to the Catholic Faith

    Welcome home and thank you for your service. I was Agnostic for a while but knew if I came back to organized religion, it would be Catholic. Wherever I was, I could always find a mass and always knew when to sit, kneel and stand, even when I didn't fully understand or only knew enough to get by of the language (German, Italian, Chinese, or French) where I lived or visited. It's always good to be with fellow faithful in the journey.
  13. 2 points
    dominicansoul

    Prayers for LC

    Please pray as LC has eye surgery tomorrow!!
  14. 2 points
    gloriana35

    Should someone with mental illness give up on being a nun?

    I've known hundreds of religious, from various communities - and (though I am not suggesting this is so in your case) have heard some stories from vocation directors that I'd never have expected. Based on some of their experiences, vocation directors often are extremely cautious (and, perhaps, too inclined to expect this) about candidates who they perceive as possibly wanting to be supported (in a sense of finances and housing.) Even forty years ago, one of the first questions I heard (since I had BA and MA degrees in music) was whether I was seeking to enter a convent because I couldn't find work with those 'useless' degrees. At 28, I think it would be important for you to be employed and independent, in order to be considered. Superiors well may be wary of anyone with mental illness (I have bipolar disorder, so this is no slur) - they fear disruption in community life. If you are not employed, or are only working as a volunteer (possible if one had independent income), there is a possibility that superiors would wonder if you were seeking religious life in order to have a home and 'family.' They may be concerned that you are looking for security.
  15. 2 points
    gloriana35

    Teenager with a religious vocation? Help?

    Beatitude made some very wise points. Many people, especially those who are very sensitive and dedicated, have tumultuous emotions during their teenage years. Your having considered suicide and the obsession with committing a sin, wanting to be a martyr, and so forth can both indicate you need medical treatment and that you have an overlay of excessive romanticism and drama about your vocation. Solid spiritual direction is not easy to find - but I do hope you are able to get a fine spiritual director. Since you are not old enough to enter a religious community, may I recommend that you not discuss the vocation with family and friends now. It might be best that you concentrate on your studies, and have daily Eucharist and the Offices as part of your practise. Apart from the liturgy being the prayer of the Church, orthopraxy (which has sustained the Abrahamic faiths since long before Jesus walked the earth) is possible regardless of our feelings, even if we are only 'going through the motions' much of the time. You clearly are a very imaginative sort, and focusing on the liturgy may help to keep you from dreams of martyrdom, sleeping on the floor, dancing in a flowing habit, and so forth. This intense imagination and romanticism may lessen by the time you are old enough to consider application to a congregation. It may be an excellent idea to obtain your theology degree first - I found the studies for my own divinity degree (though I did it in my 50s, many years after I recognised my call to consecrated life) to be very enriching, not only intellectually but in my prayer. Blessings.
  16. 2 points
    28yrolddiscerner

    Vocation discernment and getting older

    Please pray that I can find a community that is a good fit, before I get too old to join. And also prayers for a depressed family in deep pain. Thank you
  17. 1 point
    CatherineM

    Destruction of Port Royal

    http://www.lulu.com/shop/catherine-mardon-and-austin-mardon/gandy-and-the-underwater-city/paperback/product-23257331.html
  18. 1 point
    sr.christinaosf

    Thoughts from a Franciscan Sister

    Geographically Challenged I’ll part here from posts of a more spiritual and (hopefully) inspirational nature to share a little antidote which you may find humorous. (Some good might as well come from my being “g…
  19. 1 point
    Ash Wednesday

    What I learned today...

    @BarbaraTherese you have nothing to apologize for. There was only confusion but nothing to worry about. Now I'm googling to see which saints have a lot of tattoos. Particularly popular are St. Michael the Archangel, Saint Christopher, and Saint Jude. Though likely the most popular saint tattoo is the most powerful saint, the Blessed Mother. Though, of course I'm just talking about saints, it's a given that Christian/Catholic tattoos of Jesus or the cross would probably be the most likely.
  20. 1 point
    CatherineM

    Destruction of Port Royal

    The underwater city I want to dive in is Alexandria. Want to so bad that I set one of my kid’s books there. Basset hound scuba diving is worth the sticker price.
  21. 1 point
    Seven77

    Angelic Warfare Confraternity

    Have you filled out the contact form on the AWC website? I'm sure that you get a quick response if you do. I'm a member of the Confraternity and have the blessing of living close to the Dominican House of Studies. I was enrolled about three or four years ago now. If you can't find an Dominican priest nearby to enroll you, you can always get any priest that you know to enroll you after contacting the director, Father Brent. By the way, there is a novena coming up to the Holy Spirit for these times that will be prayed by members of the Confraternity and is open to all...
  22. 1 point
    Selah

    Saints and Lazarus

    St. Paul, and I think St. Peter. In the book of Acts, by God's power they raise people from the dead. Those were the first two that came to my mind. Here's a link to a book you might find interesting: https://www.amazon.com/Saints-Who-Raise-Dead-Resurrection/dp/0895557983
  23. 1 point
    dominicansoul

    Prayers for LC

    SURGERY WAS CANCELLED! She still has some swelling in her eye, so they have to wait a bit longer. Keep those prayers going, peeps!
  24. 1 point
    Antigonos

    Prayers for LC

    A refuah shelayma [quick and complete recovery]
  25. 1 point
    CatherineM

    Returning to the Catholic Faith

    Welcome home, and thank you for your service.
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