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  1. Nihil Obstat

    Nihil Obstat

    Church Militant


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  2. beatitude

    beatitude

    Mediator of Meh


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  3. vee

    vee

    Church Militant


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  4. dominicansoul

    dominicansoul

    Church Militant


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Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 10/21/2016 in all areas

  1. 9 points
    PhuturePriest

    So Yesterday I Turned 21

    I joined this website when I was 14. Let that sink in and feel old. I got to celebrate my birthday by serving for His Eminence, Cardinal Burke. It was my second time meeting him, and he is such a kind and gentle man. Knowing it was my 21st birthday, he allowed an exception in his busy schedule so I could have a picture with him. Then this morning after serving Mass for him again, I spoke with him afterwards and asked him to sign a copy of Hope For the World. His response was "For you? How could I say no?" I could have melted. Anyway, for the more alcoholic-interested people, I went to a great Irish pub in Dallas and had an ale for my first drink, which was fantastic. I knew I hated beer and didn't know what the difference was, but I knew I love ye olde England, and chose a drink based off that. Smithwick's ale is fantastic and I will be ordering another one when possible. Someone bought me a whiskey despite my protests, and, as expected, I despised it. I then tried a frozen margarita which, as expected, I hated. And the low quality picture, for those of you who are still mildly interested in that. It's unfortunate it isn't great, but he was in a hurry, plus there are a ton of other pictures that will be coming out soon.
  2. 7 points
    beatitude

    My next steps

    Until 2016 I was a candidate with a secular institute, which unfortunately had no members in my country. This made receiving solid consistent formation very difficult, and as the women in the institute seemed uncertain about how best to manage the situation and after several years I was getting no closer to making any kind of vows, I decided that this could not God's will for me and I withdrew. The institute shared the spirituality of Bl. Charles de Foucauld. I had originally discerned with a religious community founded in that tradition, but at the time I felt, along with the provincial, that my disabilities would make their life too difficult for me. However, I remained close friends with these sisters, and recently the provincial told me that if I am willing to try their life they are willing to do their best to accommodate me. She suggested I visit the house where I would be entering if I did become a postulant. I went in July, and I felt very much at home. The next time I see the provincial, I am going to ask to become a postulant. I've already told my parents, and the first thing my mother said was, "I've been half-expecting this." They seem honestly happy about it, and this to me is a very good sign - in the past they've always been a bit nervous when I mentioned religious life, although they always tried to be supportive. The final thing that has pushed me to take this step is a lot of trouble that has arisen in my family over my grandmother's will. I've been pretty shocked by the greed that it's stirred up, and the malice. I kept thinking about the words of Jesus - "Where your treasure is, there will your heart be" - and seriously asking myself where my own heart is. That verse has given me a lot of food for meditation. I thought of Bl. Charles de Foucauld, who wrote, "My Lord Jesus, how quickly will they become poor who, loving you with all their heart, cannot accept to be richer than their Beloved. How quickly they will become poor who accept with faith your words: If you wish to be perfect, go and sell all you own and give it to the poor. Blessed are the poor." I'm a greedy person myself and I can't say that my heart is always in the right place, but I know where I want it to be, and I think its deepest and purest wants will be answered in the community founded in the footsteps of the saint who wrote that. Pray for me, pham.
  3. 7 points
    Luigi

    2017 Entrances, Vows, and Ordinations

    The Trappist monastery of Our Lady of the Mississippi has received a postulant, Sr. Mary Gabriel. Check out the photo - either the novice director is very short, or Sr. Mary Gabriel is very tall. (Depending on when you read this, you may have to look in the Blog Archive under 2017 February.) http://mississippiabbey.blogspot.com/
  4. 6 points
    sr.christinaosf

    Needs of our home

    Would you please pray for our facility for elderly/vulnerable. One special intention is regarding our Mass schedule. Thank you.
  5. 6 points
    dominicansoul

    do you wish those who reject papal infallibility would leave the church?

    I would rather they repent and be saved rather than leave the Church
  6. 5 points
    beatitude

    My next steps

    In a way it's surreal. In another way it just feels completely...normal. I've got to know the sisters well and I'm at ease with them. It's been just over ten years since I met them, and I can see that the intervening decade has been good for me: as a twenty-year-old I really couldn't have entered anywhere. I was still figuring out what my capabilities and limitations were. At one point I would have said that I'd wasted a lot of time and looked enviously at those young women who enter straight from college or even school, but now I'm not so fixed on doing everything at 100 miles an hour and I can appreciate that each person's journey is different. This self-acceptance and peace is another sign to me that I'm doing the right thing. Even if I don't persevere in the life, I will have been right to try. I am also remembering my reaction to these nuns when I met them for the first time. In my country they wear all blue, in honour of Mary, but no habit as such - it could just be a blue skirt and a blue shirt that they found in any second-hand shop (they take their poverty very seriously) with their congregational cross. They try to live in the same way as the poor and marginalised, so in Brazil this means a mud hut in an Amazonian village with the indigenous people, and in London it means a cramped apartment in an inner-city high rise. They say that they themselves cannot do much in these places, but they bring the Blessed Sacrament there, and He can do everything. As a nineteen-year-old, I was intrigued by this way of life, but also unimpressed: I wanted a beautiful monastery with ancient stonework and the traditional flowing veil and all the rest of it. I wanted some glamour and mystique. It was almost as if I were picking and choosing 'my' congregation from a conveyer belt of sushi. Now part of me is wondering nervously if I will even be accepted for postulancy - suppose some sisters disagree with the provincial about me? - which is a definite about-face! And this too is another sign that I'm knocking at the right door, because Heaven knows I couldn't have found this unfamiliar humility otherwise.
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