Jump to content

Leaderboard

  1. little2add

    little2add

    Chummy Commoner


    • Points

      3

    • Content Count

      2,724


  2. CatherineM

    CatherineM

    Church Scholar


    • Points

      2

    • Content Count

      15,948


  3. littlebell

    littlebell

    Chummy Commoner


    • Points

      1

    • Content Count

      104


  4. cappie

    cappie

    Catholic Clergy


    • Points

      1

    • Content Count

      6,040



Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/19/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    CatherineM

    Wife or the Other Woman?

    Granting annulments was way above my pay grade. I just worked on the paperwork. I have often said that seeking divorce is a symptom that something was wrong from the beginning. Usually they didn’t understand what marriage really meant. I never saw a couple in tribunal who I felt had a truly sacramental marriage. Just my experience. Not scientific. I should also say that a marriage can survive infidelity. It takes work, but can be done.
  2. 1 point
    cappie

    Holy Saturday

    “Something strange is happening – there is a great silence on earth today, a great silence and stillness. The whole earth keeps silence because the King is asleep…” So begins an ancient homily for Holy Saturday. The text dates to the 4th century and was written in Greek; the author is unknown. In it he describes Christ’s descent to the dead, where he grasps Adam and Eve and frees them from sorrow: “He (Christ) took [Adam] by the hand and raised him up, saying: ‘Awake, O sleeper, and rise from the dead, and Christ will give you light… I did not create you to be a prisoner in hell. Rise from the dead, for I am the life of the dead. Rise up, work of my hands, you who were created in my image. Rise, let us leave this place, for you are in my and I am in you; together we form only one person and we cannot be separated.’” We stand in the middle of the great Triduum, the three great days of our Lord’s work. These three days are the holiest of days. What happened on these days long ago are the only events that ever truly changed the world. And today we find ourselves living once again in the Day of Silence. Living on the boundary between Good Friday and Holy Easter, we find ourselves stopped for a moment, to tread water with Christ in his being-dead for us. Today we are stopped in our tracks by the narrative of death and burial. On Holy Saturday, God proves that there is no abyss of sin and godlessness that he cannot descend into. The depths of God’s love run every bit as deep as the depths of sin and death which we unleash upon the world. And tomorrow we will learn that the depths of God’s love run infinitely deeper than the abyss of sin…but we’re not there yet. When we look at the God of Holy Saturday, the Trinitarian, cruciform God and ask ourselves how we might possibly image this kind of love, we find ourselves drawn into God’s loving descent into the depths of our sin for our salvation. When we say that we, as the church are the image of the Trinity, we are making the daring statement that we are joining in the pattern of Christ, in giving ourselves away, in expending ourselves for other, in putting others before ourselves, in loving others even to the point of death for their sake. This is what the life of the Trinity looks like when translated into the life of the sinful world. And so, as we seek to live and be the body of Christ, the one who descended into hell for us, his body lying cold in the grave, let us with humility and sobriety remember the horrifically great cost of love. God’s love for us cost him what was most precious to him, his own Son. If we would follow God, if we would be the ikon of his love in the world, the same pattern of self-giving must be true of us. We must, if we seek to follow God, descend into the world of sin and suffering and expend our love on all the unlovely people that we meet. And, as with Christ it may mean our death. But here is the miracle of Holy Saturday: Because Christ has died our death for us, we are never alone in death. “For this reason, Christ died and lived again, that he might be the Lord of both the dead and the living.”
  3. 1 point
    little2add

    Drop a word, keep a word

    Holy Week
  4. 1 point
    littlebell

    Wife or the Other Woman?

    Wow Lilllabet, I've noticed a judgemental tone in several of your past posts, but you really outdid yourself in this one. Who are you to judge someone you never even met, and don't know anything about? People like you are one of the reasons I'm no longer Catholic.
  5. 1 point
    little2add

    Drop a word, keep a word

    Angry words
  6. 1 point
    cruciatacara

    Wife or the Other Woman?

    I am so happy for you that you are without sin and can cast stones at others. That must feel so good. Yes,my brother made mistakes and yes he sinned, but the Church did not help him in the situation, it failed him. No, he did not end up with a 'hardbody' whatever you mean by that, but with a kind and loving woman, unlike the Catholic sociopath he married. And as for celibacy, that was how he spent most of his first marriage because she was always out cheating. I won't even try to find any compassion in you because you seem to love the laws of the Pharisees more than the mercy of God. All I was trying to show was that there are two sides to every story but your response was like the story of the man and the woman and the donkey... no matter what they did, people judged them as doing the wrong thing. I'm just grateful that my own Catholic friends aren't so 'judgy, judgy, judgy'. Out of here.
  7. 1 point
    little2add

    Drop a word, keep a word

    Substitute teacher
×