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  1. BarbaraTherese

    BarbaraTherese

    Chummy Commoner


    • Points

      32

    • Content count

      7,068


  2. Luigi

    Luigi

    Church Militant


    • Points

      29

    • Content count

      5,924


  3. Laurie

    Laurie

    Chummy Commoner


    • Points

      23

    • Content count

      176


  4. Sponsa-Christi

    Sponsa-Christi

    Church Militant


    • Points

      19

    • Content count

      710



Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/19/2018 in all areas

  1. 5 points
    Pax17

    New Nurse for Cistercians

    From Mount Saint Mary's Abbey: https://msmabbey.org/news/nursing-school-graduate
  2. 4 points
    Nunsuch

    New Book: New forms of religious life

    There is a new book on new forms of religious life, including hermit life, consecrated virgins, and others. Some here may find it of interest: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1717148026/
  3. 4 points
    BarbaraTherese

    Old Friend made Bishop

    An ex parish priest and good friend has just been made a bishop http://cathnews.com/cathnews/32414-new-bishop-for-darwin Please say a prayer for him
  4. 4 points
    Sponsa-Christi

    Active vs Contemplative

    The house I lived in wasn't exactly a boarding house-type of situation. Of course everyone there had a different charism and their own respective community prayer practices and other customs, but the house itself was founded primarily for the purpose of giving student-Sisters as much of a "normal" convent living situation as possible. We prayed in common twice a day, observed particular house rules, celebrated special events together, and had times of recreation that were for the express purpose of fostering a sense of community. It was also a relatively small group of Sisters living there full-time, so we did all get to know each other pretty well. (And by the way...I'm not saying exactly where I lived here in public, so as to respect everyone's privacy. ) Over all, my time living there was a good experience! But somewhat to my surprise, it really did confirm for me that I was called to be a consecrated virgin and not an apostolic Sister. Living in community actually helped me realize that an independent living situation doesn't have to be less radical than a life in common. That is, a non-communal consecrated life should be just as radical, only in other ways; namely, radical in terms of a greater focus on relating to God in silence. In my personal experience, anyway, I didn't see my craving for silence as being simply about my own preferences. I mean, don't get me wrong, of course there were times when I did want peace and quiet for entirely human reasons! But ultimately, I came to an understanding that I needed a greater degree of silence and solitude just to be spiritually healthy in my vocation on a basic level. I imagine this is probably a pretty close parallel to the experience of many religious who need a vibrant community life to sustain them in their vocation. So I think it's a matter of different vocations = different gifts = different specific spiritual needs.
  5. 4 points
    Nihil Obstat

    I am going to be a dad

    Less than two months to go.
  6. 3 points
    Peace

    Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy's retirement

    Please. You do not oppose anything. You want it to be legalized. Why don't you oppose rape and theft by making them legal too? Well why shouldn't it be legal for me to come over to your house right now and murder you for no reason? Under what principle should it be illegal for me to murder you, if not because it is immoral? And drafting someone during a time of war is not the equivalent of killing the person. That is nonsense. No, it is not a fake issue. The only reason you keep calling it a fake issue is because you want to discourage pro-life people from trying. You are extremely naive if you think that anyone is going to be influenced by these types of statements. The right to privacy is not absolute. And the right to live is more important than a right to privacy. You would even legalize late term abortions, wouldn't you?
  7. 3 points
    AveMariaPurissima

    2018 - Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    Two new novices! From the Mt. Thabor Dominicans in Ortonville, MI: Sr. Paulina Marie of the Holy Spirit (More pictures on the community's Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/mtthabor.dominicannuns/) And from the Barhamsville Poor Clares: Sr. Mary Francesca of the Blood of Christ http://pcheartponderings.blogspot.com/2018/06/investiture-of-postulant-casey-as.html
  8. 3 points
    Peace

    Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy's retirement

    It is impossible to further the common good without acknowledging and defending the right to life, upon which all the other inalienable rights of individuals are founded and from which they develop. A society lacks solid foundations when, on the one hand, it asserts values such as the dignity of the person, justice and peace, but then, on the other hand, radically acts to the contrary by allowing or tolerating a variety of ways in which human life is devalued and violated, especially where it is weak or marginalized. Only respect for life can be the foundation and guarantee of the most precious and essential goods of society, such as democracy and peace. Pope John Paul II, Evangelium vitae (1995), no. 101 The inviolability of the person which is a reflection of the absolute inviolability of God, finds its primary and fundamental expression in the inviolability of human life. Above all, the common outcry, which is justly made on behalf of human rights-for example, the right to health, to home, to work, to family, to culture- is false and illusory if the right to life, the most basic and fundamental right and the condition for all other personal rights, is not defended with maximum determination. Pope John Paul II, Christifideles Laici (1988), no. 38 I hope she gets nominated. It would be great if a woman wrote the decision that overturns Roe, since so much of the pro-choice movement is directed toward the idea that pro-lifers are anti-women.
  9. 3 points
    Nunsuch

    2018 - Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    Sister Marissa Butler is received into the novitiate of the Sisters of Mercy in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. She will be part of the West/Midwest Community. https://www.sistersofmercy.org/about-us/news-and-events/sister-marissa-butler-received-as-novice/
  10. 3 points
    NadaTeTurbe

    Emergency prayer - appartment for next year

    Hi everybody. I thought I had an appartment who is adapted to my disability and close to my school for next year, but I messed up in the process w/ the government office who is giving me the appartment and I can't have it ! My only hope is that on July the 3rd, there will be some studios left, hopefully adapted and close to my school too. I'm trying to join the government office but that's french administration... Please pray Saint Joseph & Saint Expedit that I have somewhere to live next year, good for my health and allowing me to thrive in my studies.
  11. 3 points
    BarbaraTherese

    Holiness

    “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind’ and ‘Love your neighbour as yourself.’”
  12. 3 points
    Sponsa-Christi

    Active vs Contemplative

    Acts of self-denial, large and small, are going to be a part of any vocation. But I don't think God would call anyone to a vocation where the fundamental duties of that state in life were experienced as white-knuckled sacrifices all the time, or even most of the time. I think when we're doing God's will for our lives, the sacrifices we have to make, even when they are difficult, are deep-down undergirded by a sense of peace and even joy. As in, there's a fundamental sense of "rightness" to them. (I'm thinking also of St. Ignatius' image of water falling on a sponge vs. water falling on a rock.)
  13. 3 points
    Laurie

    Active vs Contemplative

    I myself wouldn’t draw conclusions about active religious sisters from living with some of them in a boarding house/communal living type situation. In that scenario, there is no cohesion of the type they have when living in their own communities & sharing a charism, apostolate, and structure with their own sisters. Taking a bunch of active religious and having them live together for the purpose of studies is a very different thing than how their lives would normally be lived out in their communities. I’m going to bet a good number of them were themselves exhausted by the scenario you describe, whether or not they showed it or confided as much to you. In such situations, it can be a great time to grow in holiness because almost nothing about daily life is to your own preference or your own choosing. I lived in a boarding house run by sisters in Rome. They had an apostolate to college women, to provide a home for us. There were about 15 of them and 50 or so of use. As for myself, it was exhausting. The constant need to chit chat, in order to be polite (in Italian, no less) during meals, in the hallways & breakroom, was a real act of love on my part. It was something I had to focus on every day & draw strength from the Eucharist for – to be kind & patient & listen, to be cheerful and interested in the minutiae of conversations, when what I craved was silence and solitude after a long day of classes & hearing lectures. I think there are a lot of women who would have a similar struggle in a similar situation – whether they were consecrated or lay, or consecrated virgins, or active sisters, or a contemplative sister on leave to study & live elsewhere for a period of time. In the collegio where I lived, the sisters themselves had a deep structure. They ran the home in shifts, giving a chunk of them at any given time space for solitude & prayer. They had their own quiet weekends once a month where all except a handful disappeared (no doubt a sacrifice, in that while they were in their segregated quarters, the girls had no obligation to be quiet – and so while the sisters’ “quiet time” exonerated them from speaking & work, due to their very apostolate of providing a home for us, they didn’t have the luxury of pristine silence. That doesn’t mean they didn’t crave it. It’s quite possible some of them did but made a sacrifice of that desire for the sake of caring for us.) I know some mothers of many who innately crave solitude and quiet but it is not, in the years of raising children at least, what the Lord is asking of them. I’ve spent a lot of time with the Missionaries of Charity & know the amount of time they spend serving others can be taxing, despite the chunks of time in their day for silence & prayer. I also know a few Carmelites who get itching with all that solitude and crave a little less of it.
  14. 3 points
    Laurie

    More info -- Prayers for Erica (kidney recipient)

    Thanks to each of you for the prayers. I've got some more details. (Everything I share here is with the permission of the consecrated virgin in need of a kidney transplant.) For one, you may pray for her by name: Erica Second, July 18 will be an important day of medical appointments for her. Third, in addition to Stage 5 kidney failure from an inherited kidney disease, she has cerebral palsy. This is no big deal to her, but from my view, she has already got a lot on her plate. The last thing she needs is endless delays in receiving a kidney. Dialysis 3 times a week, for which she stays several hours, is exhausting. Fourth, her insurance will cover me completely, in terms of surgery, if this goes forward, but both her surgery & mine will have to take place in her state. We are on separate sides of the country. In terms of finances, the Good Lord needs to provide for me so that my mom & I can flight out there and stay for a week minimum while I recover enough to fly home. Fifth, please join me in praying to Our Lady Undoer of Knots (details & prayers here: http://www.theholyrosary.org/maryundoerknots). Sixth, if you already have a devotion to OLUK, you might like this folk image of her, for sale here: https://www.etsy.com/listing/591969729/8x10-our-lady-undoer-of-knots-folk-art?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=mary undoer of knots&ref=sr_gallery-1-3
  15. 2 points
    PrayerSupporter

    Solemn Profession, Terre Haute IN Carmel

    Sister Christine made her solemn profession on June 2nd. http://heartsawake.org/news/solemn-profession-sr-christine/ p.s. Sigh. I am not good at adding postings to existing topics! My apologies; I wanted to add this to the 2018 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations but wasn't successful. Please, if it is possible, will someone move it to there? Thank you!
  16. 2 points
    dUSt

    Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy's retirement

    So, despite everything wrong about Trump, this was one of the only reasons why I felt a vote for Trump would be a good thing. Justice Kennedy was the swing vote reaffirming Roe vs Wade. Now he's going to be replaced by a Trump pick. It's game time folks. This is what it was all about.
  17. 2 points
    GreenScapularedHuman

    'Nones' The New Normal

    Perhaps this is not compatible with how religion operates in general but I think some of the failures of religion have been a reluctance to modernize (despite this being a trend through history to adapt to culture), a failure to handle public reputation and relations,a failure to market their product/ideology, and quite candidly a failure at why people psychologically and socially go to any religion. I don't think the importance of faith should be on the number of adherents or believers... I don't think such polls really give a grasp for the influence of cultural Catholicism and Christianity. Even Richard Dawkins, evolutionary biologist and ardent proponent of atheism- rationalism - skepticism - naturalism... has said that he doesn't think his conviction that there is no god is 100% and that he counts himself as a cultural Christian. He in fact has some close friendships with bishops within the church of england and with some scientist priests in the Catholic Church. In my personal quest with the Green Scapular I have been drawn to writings of the middle ages and prior, moreover the very early times of Christian belief and practice, something I have been trying to understand better is... what was the first appeal to early converts and what kept generations after that interested? I have some rather detailed thoughts from my reading on various issues... but one issue that I notice by various authors is the stressing of purity and legalization of faith. Faith became more important than charity and hope, and all the other virtues, in the Christian world... despite the fact that what won so many early converts was likely the message of charity and hope. I have been reading in various places, incuding the Second Vatican Council and elsewhere, that the Holy Spirit moves everywhere... Perhaps rather than seeing this as a cause for frustration but rather see it as a chance for self-examination and learning... perhaps even in some way its the Holy Spirit making a vote against the highly structured and legalistic faiths that have developed that focus rather strongly on some very narrow moral issues.
  18. 2 points
    BG45

    For the Repose of a Soul

    Back in 2005, I met a non-traditional student in his 40s when I switched to Criminal Justice as a major. Really knowledgeable guy, great sense of humor, spoke several languages passably, though not fluently. We had classes together for the next three years, studied for Finals together many times, and then ended up doing our Masters together as well. We both went for our doctorate at different places, and he hit financial roadblocks. Eventually he unfollowed me on Facebook, saying it was too hard to see me in his dream job, though I told him it was okay, and that quite honestly, I envied him having found the love of his life while I remained single. We'd still chat once in a while, and we'd banter like old times if I commented on one of his non-academic posts. Tonight I came home from Chicago to log in to Facebook and see he was tagged in a post by his wife, lamenting that she had lost the love of her life and best friend last night. So if you all would please pray for the repose of Russ's soul, I'd be deeply appreciative. It's just...a shock right now.
  19. 2 points
    Laurie

    2018 - Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    This is a beautiful group of nuns, not far from where I work. They used to have a chapel so ugly, it was distracting to pray in. But I did so anyhow, b/c they are lovely & they have Adoration. Thankfully, the chapel has been redone. Before (it's completely mind-boggling -- there was a huge glass encasement filled with...plastic yellow...weird...ribbon...things...it was hideous): http://www.opnuns-fh.org/vocations/ AND https://www.cardcow.com/64627/monastery-blessed-sacrament-29575-middlebelt-road-farmington/ What it looks like now: http://www.cgp-architecture.com/blessedsac.htm
  20. 2 points
    Luigi

    2018 - Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    The Dominican nuns of Blessed Sacrament monastery in Michigan have received another postulant, Sister Alisha. They received one postulant earlier this year. ############################################# Monastery of the Blessed Sacrament added 6 new photos to the album: Sr. Alisha. June 4 at 11:00 AM · Sr. Alisha's entrance Six photos here:
  21. 2 points
    dUSt

    The Wall

    I don't think crossing borders is a crime, so I don't agree with having a wall at all. People should be free to come and go as they please. If they want to take advantage of the full U.S. welfare system, then they should become U.S. citizens. If they don't become U.S. citizens, they should be identified, given a non-citizen ID and provided basic human needs (minimal welfare). If they do a crime, they do the time (I also think the criminal system needs an overhaul to better turn criminals into productive people, instead of turning criminals into worse criminals). And yes, I also think the U.S. should be a better neighbor.
  22. 2 points
    Sponsa-Christi

    Active vs Contemplative

    From outward appearances, I do have a fairly "active" life. I have a demanding full-time job that can involve a lot of pastoral interaction with the people I serve. And I try to make myself available to be of service to the diocese in other ways even outside the parameters of my day job. But, I go home to solitude, which does provide a lot of very helpful silence that I likely wouldn't have if I was a member of an apostolic religious community. So I'm not saying all CVs need a literal certain number of solitary hours per day. I was trying to compare and contrast the general character of my life vs. a life where "community" was a major emphasis. Maybe my experiences won't resonate with absolutely everyone, but I'd guess there are probably some common threads with CVs in general. And honestly, I would strongly discourage a woman who wasn't spiritually drawn to solitude on at least some level from discerning a vocation to consecrated virginity. This is for a couple of reasons: 1. a CV is going to de facto have a lot of solitude in her life almost basically no matter what, so you need to know how use it fruitfully and have it not be a routinely terrible experience; but more importantly: 2. the core of a vocation to consecrated virginity is a call to a distinctively spousal relationship with Christ, and you need a lot of quiet time with God to nurture this. Being a CV can be really, really hard! And having your prayer life in order is what will make or break a CV's vocation. It's the difference between being a fruitful spiritual mother or winding up as a lonely spinster. If a woman for whatever reason was chronically unable to find time or space in her life for a great deal of prayer and a sufficient amount of silence (however much "sufficient" truly means for her), for her own well-being it really is best she not become a CV. Like Laurie, I'm also writing these things out of sincere concern for potential future CVs--a lot of this is what I wish someone would have told me ten years ago when I was preparing for my own consecration.
  23. 2 points
    Laurie

    Prayers for Christopher & his family

    One year ago, I was consecrated with two other women in the Archdiocese of Detroit. As we've approached our first anniversary this weekend, one of my consecrated sisters, quite abruptly, lost her brother last week. His funeral was last Saturday & his burial is tomorrow. They are a very sweet & strong & faithful family. Please pray for them.
  24. 2 points
    Laurie

    Active vs Contemplative

    I believe you! And I 100% respect *your discernment*. What I don't support is the leap that because it was *right for you* it is indicative *of the CV vocation at large*. The vocation to consecrated virginity lived in the world exists on a spectrum. There are CVs who live very quiet, very contemplative lives. They live by themselves, don't necessarily have to work to support themselves (some eek by on social security due to serious illnesses), and spend a LOT of time in silence & prayer. This is absolutely legitimate and in conformity with the vocation. There are *also* CVs who have a strong baseline prayer structure, and solitude, and who, beyond that, are VERY active. I know one who is blessed financially. Instead of spending her time in silence and prayer, alone in her home, she opens up her (large) home to all kinds of young women (not just Catholics) who need a safe & loving place to say. That CV lives a life that is a whole lot more like an active religious. Her vocation & calling is as legitimate as a CV who lives a more contemplative life. I think if *you yourself * discerned you needed a greater degree of silence & solitude to be spiritually healthy in your vocation on a baseline level, then that was very prudent & wise of you to discern & follow. What I caution against is taking the concrete ways in which the Lord has called *you* (and X number of women you happen to know) to serve Him, and reading into that expectations for what the vocation to consecrated virginity in the world is as a whole. Anyhow, as I always say between us here, I don't think going around & around is that fruitful. I've offered my thoughts for what they are worth, mostly for discerners who pop by here & don't always know what to conclude. I'd hate for any of them to conclude, "I've never been drawn to a contemplative order, therefore I'm probably not called to be a CV in the world." Or, "I've been drawn to this or that active religious order; therefore, I guess I'm not called to be a CV in the world." Because, both of those conclusions would be absolutely unfounded. Hope that makes sense. Take care!
  25. 2 points
    Egeria

    Active vs Contemplative

    I do think that Sponsa has a point here. A couple of decades ago I had quite a bit of contact with hermits and with those involved in eremitical formation (Roman Catholic and Angican). And more than one person told me that they had found that apostolic sisters generally found it more difficult to adapt to eremitical life than both monastics and lay people. There are clearly differences within all those groups (I can think of several monastics who would find it difficult to live on their own!), but there does seem to be a general trend. And Sponsa is absolutely right that solitude and silence is about more than specific times of prayer.
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