Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
InPersonaChriste

The Wedding Dress Orders (For Us Romantics)

Recommended Posts

truthfinder

The custom of covering one's hair after marriage began at least as far back as the Middle Ages.  A virgin was supposed to let her hair lie free; but since it was an "allurement", covering it [except for one's husband] became the rule.  Wearing one's hair wound up on the head was also thought a sign of maturity, and even as recently as the Victorian period, when a girl was old enough to put her hair up was a sign she was of marriageable age.  So it doesn't surprise me that at investiture, postulants tend to have their hair down.  And of course, it does make cutting it easier...

 

I think the sign of maturity is why the older pictures of the wedding dress orders we have is of women with their hair up.  They must be mature enough, as seen by their contemporaries, to make a free decision, and wearing their hair up gives a cultural sign that they were indeed adults.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OnlySunshine

So THAT explains why the Bishop in the movie about St. Therese thought she looked "so grown up"!  I always wondered why he thought that just because she put her hair up. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chiquitunga

that's right regarding wearing the hair up and maturity, yes, I remember that from St. Therese. thanks for sharing your thoughts here truthfinder, antigonos and Mater! :like:

 

Good job, Chiqui!  This is a well-researched information.  Thank you so much!

 

Before Vatican II, The Holy See imposed a near identical Rites of Religious Profession for all communities to follow.  After Vatican II, each religious institutes and orders were encourage to go back to their sources and examine the charism of their Founder/s or Foundress/es.  What are the "healthy traditions" of the order worth keeping and what traditions needs to be revitalized? 

 

After Vatican II, one has to differentiate an active order from an autonomous cloistered order.  Active Orders or Cloistered Congregation with Superior General tends to follow a uniform Rite of Profession as approved by their respective general councils.  The autonomous monasteries such as Carmels are encourage to formulate their own ceremonial, manual, customary, etc.  The Association or Federation with the consent of its members monasteries can formulate the same documents for their own use.  As such Spanish Carmels came up with their own Ceremonial, thicker than the Pre-Vatican II counterpart.  Unfortunately, my copy is in Spanish and I cannot understand its contents.  Chiqui mentioned that some 1990 Carmels created their own English-speaking Ceremonial but I have not seen one.  A 1990 Prioress in the USA informed me that they just created their own Profession Rites, Customary, etc.

 

It is evident on the current practice that Vatican II allows freedom and flexibility in formulating the Rites of Profession as long as it is approved by the Holy See.

 

For better understanding of Vatican II documents, please read Perfectae Caritatis and Sacrosanctum Consilium.

 

Thank you for sharing all of your thoughts & the information you have gathered on Carmel here with us, Gracian! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pdavis

Stumbled on this thread looking for ICKSP. Appreciate the help with a question...

The Adorers of the Royal Heart of Jesus are the Sisters in Gricigliano, Italy based at the Institute of Christ the King.

 

The institute members live an apostolic life, not a consecrated life. Does that mean these Sisters make an apostolic promise to Msgr. Gilles Wach to live an apostolic life according to the constitution of the ICKSP?

 

The secular canons at the ICKSP do not say religious vows, just wondered if the Sisters also do not say consecrated religious vows since it is an apostolic institute?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cmaD2006

Stumbled on this thread looking for ICKSP. Appreciate the help with a question...

The Adorers of the Royal Heart of Jesus are the Sisters in Gricigliano, Italy based at the Institute of Christ the King.

 

The institute members live an apostolic life, not a consecrated life. Does that mean these Sisters make an apostolic promise to Msgr. Gilles Wach to live an apostolic life according to the constitution of the ICKSP?

 

The secular canons at the ICKSP do not say religious vows, just wondered if the Sisters also do not say consecrated religious vows since it is an apostolic institute?

 

I read the community's website, and I can't 100% acertain what sort of vows/promises the sisters make.

 

So ... my suggestion is to contact the community directly with this question, since they will be best fit to answer it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×