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#1 Annie12

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 10:21 AM

So it might just be me, but I am supper paranoid that I will never be able to be a religious because no one will accept me. I'm only at the beginning of discernment and so logically speaking, this is an unreasonable arseumption. I feel a STRONG call but I am supper worried that things won't work out. Is this the same for anyone else? Could it be because I am in love with Jesus and this matter is so dear to me? :love:

#2 Deus_te_Amat

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 10:31 AM

*
CRAZY DOPE POST, YO!

So it might just be me, but I am supper paranoid that I will never be able to be a religious because no one will accept me. I'm only at the beginning of discernment and so logically speaking, this is an unreasonable arseumption. I feel a STRONG call but I am supper worried that things won't work out. Is this the same for anyone else? Could it be because I am in love with Jesus and this matter is so dear to me? :love:


No, because if it's God's will, no one can stop you. You can only stop yourself. Your worry is a sign of a lack of trust, of an attempt to be in control of your own journey. This worry, this fear, along with everything else, must be laid at the feet of Jesus, so that it is His. Learn to trust, and learn, seek to love Him above all else. You do this by offering, and asking. Praising and listening. Through prayer.


God bless, my friend. Relax, this is the start of a beautiful journey.

#3 Theresita Nerita

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 10:39 AM

I have major experience in this (not about religious life but about my calling in the world.)

Yes, it may very well be because the matter is so dear to you. I've learned from experience (and read and heard from others) that the feeling "I could never possibly deserve this calling! I must be fooling myself!" is a sign that you ARE called. Because when you're called, you think your vocation (whatever it is) is so amesome that you can't possibly be so lucky as to be called to it. If you weren't called, you'd think "yeah, i could do that easily, because it's not that hard."

But DTA is also right - with perfect trust in God's will, your panic will go away.

If you have St. Francis de Sales' Introduction to the Devout Life, read the section on "Anxiety"! It helped me a lot.

#4 EmilyAnn

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 10:42 AM

You are soooooo not the only one. I had this fear a lot, especially when I first started discerning. I think it's the same way that people who feel called to marriage sometimes worry they'll never find the right spouse. The future is a scary thing, because we don't know how it's all going to unfold.

And DTA is right, a big part of it is trust - trust that if God is calling you, then He will make the way.

#5 nunsense

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 11:21 AM

So it might just be me, but I am supper paranoid that I will never be able to be a religious because no one will accept me. I'm only at the beginning of discernment and so logically speaking, this is an unreasonable arseumption. I feel a STRONG call but I am supper worried that things won't work out. Is this the same for anyone else? Could it be because I am in love with Jesus and this matter is so dear to me? :love:


The others are right, you are 'super worried' because you love Jesus but you don't really trust Him yet. As time goes by and your love deepens, you will come to realise that He loves you more than you could ever possibly love Him, and whatever He wants is what is best for your soul. If the longing in your heart to be a religious is truly a calling from Him to that life, then as someone else has pointed out, nothing in this world will be able to prevent it from happening. The intense emotional love that you feel right now is one way that God is pulling you closer to Him, but it may be that He has other plans for your life that will bring you even closer (through marriage and motherhood perhaps). The important thing is to allow your 'romantic infatuation' (which is often what our love for Him starts out as) to transform into something more, into a love that does not question His will for you. Trust is a faith that never doubts His love, no matter what happens.

The intensity of feelings that you have right now will (over time and much prayer) become a more complete union with Him and the worries will stop. The early stages of being in love with Jesus can sometimes feel very oppressive in their intensity. St John of the Cross describes the deepening into a different kind of love so beautifully in The Living Flame of Love when in the first stanza he says '... since now you are not oppressive ...'

Be patient with yourself and trust, trust, trust. His will, not yours.





1. O living flame of love
that tenderly wounds my soul
in its deepest center! Since
now you are not oppressive,
now consummate! if it be your will:
tear through the veil of this sweet encounter!


2. O sweet cautery,
O delightful wound!
O gentle hand! O delicate touch
that tastes of eternal life
and pays every debt!
In killing you changed death to life.

3. O lamps of fire!
in whose splendors
the deep caverns of feeling,
once obscure and blind,
now give forth, so rarely, so exquisitely,
both warmth and light to their Beloved.

4. How gently and lovingly
you wake in my heart,
where in secret you dwell alone;
and in your sweet breathing,
filled with good and glory,
how tenderly you swell my heart with love.



#6 FuturePriest387

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 11:32 AM

So it might just be me, but I am supper paranoid that I will never be able to be a religious because no one will accept me. I'm only at the beginning of discernment and so logically speaking, this is an unreasonable arseumption. I feel a STRONG call but I am supper worried that things won't work out. Is this the same for anyone else? Could it be because I am in love with Jesus and this matter is so dear to me? :love:


You know, what you are experiencing is one of the few things I am well experienced in. I would always worry "What if I don't get my GED and they don't accept me even if I have a vocation?" or, "What if I flunk out of seminary because of those blasted people that want Priests to have a liberal arts education?" My new favorite that I sometimes have is "What if the economy crashes and I can't afford to do the GED test? Then nobody will accept me save the Franciscan Brothers Minor!" Well, the thing is, if you truly are called, none of this will happen. Remember Saint John Vianney. He had terrible learning problems. He was devout, pious, and wanted to be a Priest more than anything, but he was so terrible at his studies that he literally flunked out of seminary. But his Priest friend saw that he had a vocation and helped him study. When it came to do the final exams in order to enter the pre-diaconate, he still flunked, but his Priest friend asked the Bishop to visit them and to give him another chance. I do not know if he flunked the tests the second time, but the Bishop prayed and saw John had a vocation, so he let him continue, and he was eventually ordained. Even though all odds were against him and he had learning disabilities. To be a Priest you must remember a lot of things, and he never would have made it if he was not called. If you are called whatever community you are called to will accept you, because God's Will is always going to be done so long as we cooperate. I would recommend praying to Saint John Vianney so that he helps you with trusting God. This is something I dealt with harshly when I first began discerning and still sometimes deal with to this day, nearly a year and a half into discernment. Trust in God and be easy on yourself.

#7 MaterMisericordiae

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 12:18 PM

So it might just be me, but I am supper paranoid that I will never be able to be a religious because no one will accept me. I'm only at the beginning of discernment and so logically speaking, this is an unreasonable arseumption. I feel a STRONG call but I am supper worried that things won't work out. Is this the same for anyone else? Could it be because I am in love with Jesus and this matter is so dear to me? :love:


Yes, this is an unreasonable as.sumption (stupid fitler) as you know that "God does not inspire unrealizable desires" (St. Therese of Lisieux). If it's meant to be and you belong in religious life, there is nothing that will keep God from getting you in.

I will admit, though, that I struggled with the same thing you are when I first started discerning and found out how difficult it was to find an order that would accept me in spite of my depression issues. Everywhere I went, I hit a brick wall and seriously started worrying about how I was going to fulfill these desires of my heart. It became so difficult sometimes that I felt like I needed to take a break. A few times, I told myself that I was never going to discern again. :rolleyes: But the idea of religious life wouldn't go away no matter how much I tried to push it out of my head. It made me realize that God was the one that kept reminding me. Then, He sent a kind and helpful pastor my way to as.sist in my discernment. I would have never discerned with these Sisters if he had not introduced me to them. I trust that this is happening for a reason and I have no fear about the future. In fact, I feel more peaceful than I ever have when I think about these beautiful Sisters. I'm very hopeful that everything will go well and I will hear back from my pastor VERY soon about the psychological evaluation (when the psychologist returns from vacation). :)

"Pray, hope and don't worry. Worry is useless. God is all merciful and will hear your prayer." -- Padre Pio

Edited by MaterMisericordiae, 28 June 2012 - 12:19 PM.


#8 emmaberry

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 12:27 PM

I think a lot of people have experienced this at one point in their journey-some for a long time, some just for a moment. Like DTA said, trust God. So many posters above said so many good things!
I do worry about this sometimes-what if the community I love doesn't accept me?..etc. I try to remember Mary..who always trusted even when things weren't going the way she planned (and they hardly ever did!) If a religious community doesn't accept you in the future, thought that is a long way off, know that that is very clearly God saying, "Not here." It really is a blessing, but it can be hard to see that.

Even people who love each other deeply get cold feet on their wedding day! "What if he/she changes? What if we grow apart?" and so on. But (usually) they always come back to the realization that this is the person I love, through thick and thin, and I am willing to risk those things because I love them completely. How much more so should it be with Jesus!

Doubts are natural, but, especially if you are going to be a religious, your future Spouse loves you so much more than any earthly spouse could. He will make a way...even if it is not our way. I am not saying the community you apply to will always accept you, but you are always in His hand..He never stops thinking of you and watching your life unfold just the way He knew it would from the moment He created you!

Take your doubts to Mary, and God bless! :)

#9 Annie12

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 01:35 PM

I think my worries are for a large part due to my very restrictive diet. I'm worried that no one will be able to accomodate my needs. I know God will guide me though!!!

#10 filius_angelorum

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 05:16 PM

Nope. You are not alone. I am terrified of being accepted, horrified of being rejected, and mortified of all the attention my friends and family are giving me for pursuing my vocation.

I come back to two key spiritual themes: consecration to Mary and abandonment to divine will. They seem so cliché, but when translated into silently plodding ahead through the discernment process and refusal to keep the merits of my works for myself, I find that they are an almost infinite source for meditation. "You do meditate, don't you?" (Going My Way)

And if that sounds too much like "Pull yourself together, (wo)man," know that I don't mean it that way. I have no right to speak in such a manner. I am a wimp. I am learning, however, to let God decide if I sit on the bench or play first string, rather than letting my own insecurities keep me from doing my best. If at the end of it I am asked to sit this one out, I know that God will let me sing right along the priests and apostles someday in Paradise. If he does put me in the game, I know that I will play my wimpy heart out, even if I am not the MVP.

And that is perhaps the only basketball metaphor that this wimpy band geek will ever employ.

#11 FutureCarmeliteClaire

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 05:24 PM

You are not alone. I have been worrying about this lately, even though I've been discerning for quite a while. Mainly because of my new-found medical problems. I don't know if those are things that communities would not accept me because of, but I certainly worry about it. I have been trying to put it in God's Hands (not always successfully), but it helps to remember that someone who has a vocation to the religious life has to have acceptance into that community. And think of your community as God speaking to you. As much as we may "want" to be nuns, my SD tells me, "It's not really your vocation, is it? It belongs to God, so leave it to Him."

#12 TheresaThoma

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 06:23 PM

Nope. You are not alone. I am terrified of being accepted, horrified of being rejected, and mortified of all the attention my friends and family are giving me for pursuing my vocation.

I come back to two key spiritual themes: consecration to Mary and abandonment to divine will. They seem so cliché, but when translated into silently plodding ahead through the discernment process and refusal to keep the merits of my works for myself, I find that they are an almost infinite source for meditation. "You do meditate, don't you?" (Going My Way)

And if that sounds too much like "Pull yourself together, (wo)man," know that I don't mean it that way. I have no right to speak in such a manner. I am a wimp. I am learning, however, to let God decide if I sit on the bench or play first string, rather than letting my own insecurities keep me from doing my best. If at the end of it I am asked to sit this one out, I know that God will let me sing right along the priests and apostles someday in Paradise. If he does put me in the game, I know that I will play my wimpy heart out, even if I am not the MVP.

And that is perhaps the only basketball metaphor that this wimpy band geek will ever employ.

That is a great way of thinking about your vocation!

#13 mantellata

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 07:32 PM

A restrictive diet can be an obstacle for some communities - but not all of them. If it's not for health reasons I would suggest being open to changing your diet. :) If it is for health reasons just be open about your needs from the beginning so your heart doesn't have to be broken after being set upon a particular community that does find your dietary needs to be too restrictive. It just means God is calling you elsewhere!!

Many prayers on your continued journey!!!!!!

#14 emmaberry

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 12:21 AM

When I visited the Roswell PCCs (A strict order compared to most) they asked about any dietary restrictions or concerns, which surprised me a lot! I do not think they just do that for guests-it seemed like they had some sisters that had to have special food accommodations. So do not as*sume that, if you have allergies or are lactose-intolerate or something like that, then they cannot accommodate you-even cloisters. However, if it is more serious that MIGHT pose a problem..it depends on the community. Think of it as an easy indicator of God's will for you! Sometimes I wish I had some sort of condition or issue that might make communities think twice about accepting me-besides awkwardness. :blush: It would sure make discernment much easier by narrowing down the options.

I hope your diet is not due to a serious health issue. I had a friend that was severely gluten intolerant (I think that's the phrase) and all she could eat were these horrible crackers. I wouldn't wish that on anyone..

Edited by emmaberry, 29 June 2012 - 12:23 AM.


#15 maximillion

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 03:21 AM

If your restrictions are due to genuine health issues than I think most communities would try to accommodate. Gluten free/diabetic/lactose intolerance are pretty common these days.

#16 Strictlyinkblot

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 04:07 AM

I've struggled with this temptation for over a year. I mean, who do I think I am? What I've found helps is St. Colette's prayer 'As God pleases, as God wills'. One of the PCC websites have turned it into a type of rosary http://www.poorclarestmd.org/

#17 Annie12

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 01:56 PM

When I visited the Roswell PCCs (A strict order compared to most) they asked about any dietary restrictions or concerns, which surprised me a lot! I do not think they just do that for guests-it seemed like they had some sisters that had to have special food accommodations. So do not as*sume that, if you have allergies or are lactose-intolerate or something like that, then they cannot accommodate you-even cloisters. However, if it is more serious that MIGHT pose a problem..it depends on the community. Think of it as an easy indicator of God's will for you! Sometimes I wish I had some sort of condition or issue that might make communities think twice about accepting me-besides awkwardness. :blush: It would sure make discernment much easier by narrowing down the options.

I hope your diet is not due to a serious health issue. I had a friend that was severely gluten intolerant (I think that's the phrase) and all she could eat were these horrible crackers. I wouldn't wish that on anyone..

I actually have glutan intollerance but I'm worried because to get an official diagnosis I would have to get a coloniscopy. Since I haven't had this done I'm worried that no order will allow me to have a glutan free diet. Right now I only know I have glutan intolerance because I felt TONS better when I went off the glutan. When I eat glutan I feel like I'm dying from the inside out. It's terrible!

#18 nunsense

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 02:23 PM

I actually have glutan intollerance but I'm worried because to get an official diagnosis I would have to get a coloniscopy. Since I haven't had this done I'm worried that no order will allow me to have a glutan free diet. Right now I only know I have glutan intolerance because I felt TONS better when I went off the glutan. When I eat glutan I feel like I'm dying from the inside out. It's terrible!


Did your doctor say you had to have a colonoscopy? Because I know of many people who were diagnosed by blood testing.

The main problem with this is you are NOT supposed to be on a gluten free diet before you take the test or you get false results. It is a bit like taking antacids before having a test for H.Pylori - if you are using antacids, the results won't be true.

I didn't mean to copy this whole article, but it is a good read. Maybe you can ask for the blood tests and then be sure to have gluten in your diet for the week or so before. Once you are diagnosed, it will be easier for you when asking for a special diet. The next step is an intestinal biopsy but the blood tests should be enough for a diagnosis.


Coeliac Disease & Gluten Intolerance

Coeliac disease is caused by gluten intolerance. It affects a number of children and adults where populations have relied for centuries on foods containing gluten. Many persons remain unaware of its presence and continue to suffering its various symptoms when they can be avoided. Other non Coeliac person remain to suffer unnecessarily.



Introduction

Coeliac (celiac) disease is a life-long inflammatory disease of the upper small intestine caused by intolerance to the gluten affecting many genetically susceptible individuals worldwide. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, and other similar proteins found in rye, barley and oats. These proteins damage the small finger-like projections (villi) that line the small intestine (see Figure 1), resembling a pile in a carpet, and play a significant role in digestion. When damaged and inflamed, the villi are unable to absorb water and nutrients such as vitamins, folic acid, iron and calcium. This causes the coeliac to be susceptible to a variety of other conditions related to malabsorption, including lactose intolerance. Clinical and mucosal recovery after institution of a gluten free diet is objective evidence that the enteropathy is gluten induced.


Causes & Mechanism

Causes

The causes are presently presumed to be:

  • Genetic susceptibility to the illness.
  • A trigger, which could be one of:
    - An environmental agent, probably a virus or other infection
    - Stress
    - Pregnancy
  • Possible exposure to gluten as a young baby before the gut barrier has developed fully. This arseociation is currently under investigation.
The timing of the first exposure to gluten is also thought to be important. Babies who were introduced to wheat, barley, or rye at any time in the first three months had five times the risk of developing coeliac over those exposed at 4 to 6 months. Those exposed later had a slightly increased risk relative to those exposed at 4-6 months.

Mechanism

Gluten is a mixture of two proteins, gliadin and glutenin which when mixed with water it becomes sticky and so forms the familiar texture of dough made from wheat and rye flour.

As gluten is ingested and comes into contact with the villi covering the lining of the small intestine the immune system mistakenly attacks the villi by antibody production as if it was a 'foreign' organism. Antibodies are important defence proteins that have the ability to attach themselves to unfamiliar antigens, the enemy, such as bacteria or cancerous cells and trigger other reactions in order to destroy the offending organism or cell. In this case and in all other autoimmune diseases, a 'friendly fire' occurs the immune system fails to recognise the villi. Figure 1 shows a microscopic view of healthy villi attached to the lining of the small intestine. The antibodies are so potent that with immediate effect damage occurs (see Figure 2) and unless gluten is removed from the diet they are eventually destroyed (see Figure 3).
Apart from the inability to absorb nutrients, damaged lining to the small intestine has other negative results. It is unable to produce sufficient digestive enzymes essential to break down foods for complete digestion and absorption, such as lactose and carbohydrates. Large components of foods remain in the digestive tracts unabsorbed which are in turn fermented by bacteria living naturally in our digestive tract and ideal conditions causing cramps, gas, bloating, flatulence and diarrhoea. See related Food Intolerance pages for more information and how to supplement your diet with enzymes to avoid these symptoms. More symptoms explained below.


Symptoms & Signs

Coeliac disease has many and varied symptoms, and adult symptoms are different from those of children. A range of symptoms and signs may be arseociated with untreated coeliac disease. Diarrhoea is one of the most common symptoms to affect people of all ages with coeliac disease. Children may not gain weight or grow properly, while adults may find they lose weight. Malabsorption may also leave people tired and weak, because of anaemia caused by iron or folate deficiency.


Babies:

  • chronic diarrhoea
  • abdominal distension
  • poor feeding
  • poor weight gain
  • muscle wasting.
Children:
  • chronic diarrhoea or constipation
  • vomiting
  • poor weight gain or growth
  • poor feeding
  • irritability
  • muscle wasting.
Adults:
  • chronic diarrhea
  • weight loss
  • anaemia
  • weakness
  • fatigue
Other notes:
Rather than suffering from bowel problems, half of coeliac sufferers approach their doctor because of extreme tiredness and psychological problems such as depression, bone pain and sometimes even fractures (due to thinning of the bones), ulcers in the mouth or a blistering, itchy skin rash mostly on the elbows and knees (called dermatitis herpetiformis).
Coeliac disease may be the cause for some women having difficulty getting pregnant. Recurrent miscarriage (spontaneous loss of a pregnancy) may also be attributed to coeliac disease.
Women with coeliac disease may become diagnosed during pregnancy because their bowel cannot absorb enough iron and vitamins to keep up with the demand of being pregnant, making them severely anaemic. Babies who are small for their age in the womb (intrauterine growth retardation) are more frequently born to mothers with coeliac disease.


Prevalence

Coeliac disease is reported to be most common in Ireland at a rate of 1 in 100 people. Reviews about the rate in UK vary from 1 in 100 persons to 1 in 300. With a diagnosis of 1 in 250, Italy also has a high rate. Reports about the incidence in US vary as well, ranging from 1 per 133 to 1 per 500. However, it is more likely to be similar to the rage of the UK. Some researchers have suggested that up to 10-15% of persons may have some form of gluten intolerance but most of them either have no digestive-tract symptoms at all or they are so minor that go unnoticed. A large number of these can be Non Coeliac Gluten Intolerant.
Another problem is that many can go misdiagnosed because persons going for coeliac blood tests present themselves on a gluten free diet, hence antibodies are not present in their blood and tests prove false negative.
It's also known that the condition runs in families and was once thought to affect only children. However, many adults are now being diagnosed with the disease. It's particularly common between the ages of 30 and 45; men and women seem to be affected equally.
Coeliac disease is sometimes arseociated with other conditions including type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disease and ulcerative colitis. Some reports claim that people from the west of Ireland are more often affected, as are those from the Punjab region of India, Pakistan, the Middle East and North Africa.


Prevention

Breastfeeding and delaying the introduction of foods containing gluten until after four months is suggested to prevent children from developing coeliac disease. This would avoid exposure to gluten as a young baby before the gut barrier has developed fully. This arseociation is currently under investigation and a definitive way to stop the disease from developing is not known yet.


Treatment

Coeliac disease comes in a variation of strengths, where some people are more severely affected than others. Presently the only treatment is a life-long gluten-free diet. In the vast majority of patients, a strict gluten-free diet will relieve the symptoms. A tiny minority of patients suffer from refractory sprue, which means they do not improve on a gluten-free diet. This may be because the disease has been present for so long that the intestines are no longer able to heal. In other patients, the intestinal damage of coeliac disease may have been aggravated by other problems, such as intolerance to the dietary proteins found in eggs, milk, or soy.
Clinical trials are underway for a medication that can be taken by Coeliacs before eating gluten that will protect against an auto-immune reaction, and hence prevent intestinal damage (<a href="http://www.foodreact...ymes.html">read article) Phase II trials are expected to begin as early as the summer of 2006. Recently in the U.S. researchers developed an enzyme that is able to break down the protein arseociated with gluten intolerance and inflammation of the upper digestive tract, causing damage to the villi.
On a better note, for several years Glutenzyme has been available in the UK. It is an enzyme protease produced from natural resources (suitable for vegans) that is able to break down the gluten protein, hence limiting or eliminating the damage that gluten causes to many coeliac sufferers. Persons with severe Coeliac disease are recommended to take Glutenzyme especially when eating out to avoid any damage caused by hidden gluten. Persons who do not suffer from severe symptoms and are able to tolerate some gluten may find that Glutenzyme may help them to move onto a normal diet. See products page for Coeliac disease. Find out more about Glutenzyme.


Tests & Diagnoses

Although the doctor may request a coeliac screen, which involves blood serum investigations, these tests are not definitely diagnostic of celiac disease. Blood serum antibody tests (endomysial, reticulin (IgA), and gliadin (IgG and IgA) are used to measure levels of antibodies to gluten. If the antibodies in the blood are higher than normal then a biopsy of the small intestine is recommended.
A biopsy of the lining of the small intestine checks for damage to the villi. If the villi appear damaged then a gluten-free diet is introduced. Another biopsy is done after 6 months or more of dieting.
Relief of symptoms or reversion of an abnormal intestinal biopsy is the most convincing evidence that an individual has celiac disease or gluten sensitivity.

A thorough workup includes four tests:
  • Anti-tissue transglutaminase Antibody (tTG), IgA. This test is sometimes used alone. If this test is positive it is highly likely that the patient has coeliac disease. tTG test is not reliable in children before the age of 2.
  • Anti-gliadin antibodies (AGA), IgG and IgA. These tests are often useful when testing young symptomatic children, but they are found in fewer Coeliacs than Anti-tTG, and their presence does not automatically indicate coeliac disease because they are found in some other disorders. Some people have an IgA deficiency. They are unable to mount an IgA response to any antigen and will have false negative tests for the IgA type coeliac tests. Yet IgA deficiency is arseociated with coeliac disease and a tenfold risk of coeliac disease has been documented in selective IgA deficiency.
  • Anti-endomysial antibodies (EMA), IgA. This test is being replaced by the anti-tTG test because both tests measure the autoantibodies that cause the tissue damage arseociated with coeliac disease. Many physicians still order this test. This test as tTG test is also not reliable in children before the age of 2.
  • An older test, the anti-reticulin antibodies (ARA), IgA. IgA Anti-ARA is not ordered as frequently as it once was, because it is less sensitive and less specific than the other tests. It is found in about 60% of people with coeliac disease and 25% of those with dermatitis herpetiformis.
Other routine tests are usually requested to arseist in the diagnosis, including full blood count to check for anaemia, electrolytes, renal function and liver enzymes.



#19 i<3franciscans

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 02:40 PM

Hi Annie... seems like you are not the only worried one, but you have reason to worry. I know you have already gotten a ton of advice, but here's my two sense. If God is calling you to religious life, the order He has picked for you will accept you. If He wants you there, he will get you there. :)

#20 Annie12

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 10:00 PM

Hi Annie... seems like you are not the only worried one, but you have reason to worry. I know you have already gotten a ton of advice, but here's my two sense. If God is calling you to religious life, the order He has picked for you will accept you. If He wants you there, he will get you there. :)

you're so right and this is basically what it comes down to for me. Trust in God!!!! <3 <3




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