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First Profession At Olam

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Marie Celine of Our Lady, Handmaid of the Lord, will be making her first profession of vows! As the days of her novitiate culminate in the pre-profession retreat, please join them in praying for this beloved sister.

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I will definitely remember this in prayer!!!  I love when there are happy things to pray for - and this is a happy thing!!!  Thanks for sharing it.

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Wonderful!

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I was searching for the stuff that is unique and speechles. I am come a cross to your site and found it according to my need and demand.

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Thanks for posting the link.  I had been wondering when Sister would make her First Profession.  She is beaming!

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Hello all! I have a question about the PCPA's! I am a bit confused about the OLAM Shrine and the Monastery of Our Lady of Solitude in Tonopah. Do the Sisters enter in one monastery? Are the monasteries separate? Thank you in advance! (And if there is an old thread about this, I would appreciate being directed towards it!) 

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Posted (edited)

Hello all! I have a question about the PCPA's! I am a bit confused about the OLAM Shrine and the Monastery of Our Lady of Solitude in Tonopah. Do the Sisters enter in one monastery? Are the monasteries separate? Thank you in advance! (And if there is an old thread about this, I would appreciate being directed towards it!) 

 

Natalie, from what I understand (and it's meager) they are separate monasteries that share roots. Kind of like the Nashville Dominicans and the SistersofMary Mother ofthe Eucharist. The Tonopah monasteries was started, to my knowledge, by nuns from the OLAM community.

 

The two communties are tied only by a common spirituality and by a familial love, but they are indeed separate monasteries. So a young woman would choose one community to enter and then would remain there, not to be transferred. Actually, I specifically asked the vocation directress about this issue because I was at a time discerning with the OLAM nuns. She told me that if I entered, I would enter in Alabama and I would remain at OLAM unless I myself had the desire to join the nuns in Arizona, but that would only be after vows. She told me that they would not transfer someone unless the following conditions were fulfilled: a) OLAM was at full capacity and completely unable to accept more vocations or b) Tonopah was dying and desperately needed vocations and then always necessary was the requirement that c) the woman herself requested to be transferred.

 

So if you didn't want to transfer, you would never be pressured to do so. 

 

Ah, I checked their website and found:

"Sr. Marie Andre, Sr. Mary Fidelis, and Sr. Marie St. Paul each entered Our Lady of the Angels Monastery in Birmingham AL in the mid ’90s.  During the Year of the Eucharist, after much deliberation, it was decided that a new foundation of PCPAs would begin in the Diocese of Phoenix, AZ, at the kind invitation of Bishop Thomas J. Olmsted.  This was to be the first contemplative nuns to begin a foundation in the diocese. 

 

On March 2, 2005, we received the official permission from the Holy See to begin this new Foundation . We find it especially providential that the Lord provided this amesome opportunity to help spread the Eucharistic Reign of Jesus and the beauty of our Order in the Year of the Eucharist and our Order’s 150th Anniversary. On May 1, 2005, the Nuns left the Alabama Monastery and headed West to begin Our Lady of Solitude Monastery. For the first five years of the Foundation, the Community dwelt in Black Canyon City, AZ (North of Phoenix), in a house provided by the Diocese."

 

http://desertnuns.com/about-us/our-lady-of-solitude-monastery-history

Edited by ToJesusMyHeart

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It's interesting they left out Sr. Joanna (who was a Jr, Professed and left a few years ago) and Sr. Ester Marie (who was a Perpetually Professed Extern who left in the last year or two) who  who went to AZ with them, but subsequently left the order. It cracks my heart a little to see that if they left it's as if they were never there.  Alas, I guess it's the same in most convents/monasteries.  So sad................

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It's interesting they left out Sr. Joanna (who was a Jr, Professed and left a few years ago) and Sr. Ester Marie (who was a Perpetually Professed Extern who left in the last year or two) who  who went to AZ with them, but subsequently left the order. It cracks my heart a little to see that if they left it's as if they were never there.  Alas, I guess it's the same in most convents/monasteries.  So sad................

 

I think this might be more out of respect for the sisters who have left. If they are mentioned in an article and no longer there then the questions of "what happened" and "where are they now" inevitably come up and that can be difficult for all involved. This way the sisters that left can have some privacy especially in the transition time. 

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Natalie, from what I understand (and it's meager) they are separate monasteries that share roots. Kind of like the Nashville Dominicans and the SistersofMary Mother ofthe Eucharist. The Tonopah monasteries was started, to my knowledge, by nuns from the OLAM community.

 

The two communties are tied only by a common spirituality and by a familial love, but they are indeed separate monasteries. So a young woman would choose one community to enter and then would remain there, not to be transferred. Actually, I specifically asked the vocation directress about this issue because I was at a time discerning with the OLAM nuns. She told me that if I entered, I would enter in Alabama and I would remain at OLAM unless I myself had the desire to join the nuns in Arizona, but that would only be after vows. She told me that they would not transfer someone unless the following conditions were fulfilled: a) OLAM was at full capacity and completely unable to accept more vocations or b) Tonopah was dying and desperately needed vocations and then always necessary was the requirement that c) the woman herself requested to be transferred.

 

So if you didn't want to transfer, you would never be pressured to do so. 

 

Ah, I checked their website and found:

"Sr. Marie Andre, Sr. Mary Fidelis, and Sr. Marie St. Paul each entered Our Lady of the Angels Monastery in Birmingham AL in the mid ’90s.  During the Year of the Eucharist, after much deliberation, it was decided that a new foundation of PCPAs would begin in the Diocese of Phoenix, AZ, at the kind invitation of Bishop Thomas J. Olmsted.  This was to be the first contemplative nuns to begin a foundation in the diocese. 

 

On March 2, 2005, we received the official permission from the Holy See to begin this new Foundation . We find it especially providential that the Lord provided this amesome opportunity to help spread the Eucharistic Reign of Jesus and the beauty of our Order in the Year of the Eucharist and our Order’s 150th Anniversary. On May 1, 2005, the Nuns left the Alabama Monastery and headed West to begin Our Lady of Solitude Monastery. For the first five years of the Foundation, the Community dwelt in Black Canyon City, AZ (North of Phoenix), in a house provided by the Diocese."

 

http://desertnuns.com/about-us/our-lady-of-solitude-monastery-history

 

Thank you so much, ToJesusMyHeart! I have been wondering about this for some time, and I understand now. Have you visited the Tonopah monastery?

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Hello all! I have a question about the PCPA's! I am a bit confused about the OLAM Shrine and the Monastery of Our Lady of Solitude in Tonopah. Do the Sisters enter in one monastery? Are the monasteries separate? Thank you in advance! (And if there is an old thread about this, I would appreciate being directed towards it!) 

 

Natalie, from what I understand (and it's meager) they are separate monasteries that share roots. Kind of like the Nashville Dominicans and the SistersofMary Mother ofthe Eucharist. The Tonopah monasteries was started, to my knowledge, by nuns from the OLAM community.

 

The two communties are tied only by a common spirituality and by a familial love, but they are indeed separate monasteries. So a young woman would choose one community to enter and then would remain there, not to be transferred. Actually, I specifically asked the vocation directress about this issue because I was at a time discerning with the OLAM nuns. She told me that if I entered, I would enter in Alabama and I would remain at OLAM unless I myself had the desire to join the nuns in Arizona, but that would only be after vows. She told me that they would not transfer someone unless the following conditions were fulfilled: a) OLAM was at full capacity and completely unable to accept more vocations or b) Tonopah was dying and desperately needed vocations and then always necessary was the requirement that c) the woman herself requested to be transferred.

 

So if you didn't want to transfer, you would never be pressured to do so. 

 

Ah, I checked their website and found:

"Sr. Marie Andre, Sr. Mary Fidelis, and Sr. Marie St. Paul each entered Our Lady of the Angels Monastery in Birmingham AL in the mid ’90s.  During the Year of the Eucharist, after much deliberation, it was decided that a new foundation of PCPAs would begin in the Diocese of Phoenix, AZ, at the kind invitation of Bishop Thomas J. Olmsted.  This was to be the first contemplative nuns to begin a foundation in the diocese. 

 

On March 2, 2005, we received the official permission from the Holy See to begin this new Foundation . We find it especially providential that the Lord provided this amesome opportunity to help spread the Eucharistic Reign of Jesus and the beauty of our Order in the Year of the Eucharist and our Order’s 150th Anniversary. On May 1, 2005, the Nuns left the Alabama Monastery and headed West to begin Our Lady of Solitude Monastery. For the first five years of the Foundation, the Community dwelt in Black Canyon City, AZ (North of Phoenix), in a house provided by the Diocese."

 

http://desertnuns.com/about-us/our-lady-of-solitude-monastery-history

 

Hello NatalieIC,

The OLAM monastery and the Tonopah monastery, at this point, I think that are a little closer to each other than TJMH has well expressed in her detailed post.

 

I would only add that -and please, correct me as needed as I will speak according to what applies for Orders of nuns in general- , if you notice, there is no "abbess" in Tonopah, while there is one in every autonomous monastery of the PCPAs. The abbess for Tonopah is the abbess at OLAM, although of course one of the nuns in Tonopah is the local superior of the community, but not with the authority of an abbess. The Tonopah nuns depend canonically of the founding monastery until they reach the number of professed nuns and the condition of maturity that is required for them to be autonomous according to their own Constitutions.

 

This is the way it works for all Orders of nuns in general and it applies specifically for each Order according to their own Constitutions.

 

I don't know personally the PCPAs but I'm sure they will let us know when the nuns in Arizona become autonomous. Meanwhile they are "on their own" only to a certain extent, they still have the supervision and authority of OLAM over them.

 

This is the same case with the nuns in Texas, I think, but it is not the case with the PCPA nuns in Charlotte, NC.

 

The nuns of St. Joseph monastery in NC, have an abbess, that is they are totally autonomous: some younger nuns came from OLAM to revitalize a community that was in decline, but these nuns, new arrivals from OLAM became permanent members of St. Joseph monastery, and one of them was elected abbess. They didn't make a noviciate to become part of St Joseph. So even though we can make the connection to OLAM, they are, canonically, totally on their own in par with OLAM or any other autonomous monastery of the PCPA Order.

 

As for transfer of nuns between the monasteries of this Order, again, they will have that well established in their Constitutions, and it is always easier than a transfer from totally separated/distinct religious institutes, like for instance the Nashville Dominicans and the DMME Dominicans.

These two institutes are totally separate religious congregations even though they have the same Dominican spirit and traditions. But canonically they are different bodies. This means that for a Nashville Dominican to become a DMME, she would have to do a canonical novitiate with the DMME before professing vows as a DMME.

 

On the other hand, the autonomous monasteries of the PCPAs are not different bodies, but different cells/organs of the same body, the Order of Poor Clares of Perpetual Adoration, and to transfer among their monasteries do not need to make a novitiate. This must be stated in their Constitutions.

 

Not sure if this helps to clarify or is only creating more confusion ...

Peace  :nun2:

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Hello NatalieIC,

The OLAM monastery and the Tonopah monastery, at this point, I think that are a little closer to each other than TJMH has well expressed in her detailed post.

 

I would only add that -and please, correct me as needed as I will speak according to what applies for Orders of nuns in general- , if you notice, there is no "abbess" in Tonopah, while there is one in every autonomous monastery of the PCPAs. The abbess for Tonopah is the abbess at OLAM, although of course one of the nuns in Tonopah is the local superior of the community, but not with the authority of an abbess. The Tonopah nuns depend canonically of the founding monastery until they reach the number of professed nuns and the condition of maturity that is required for them to be autonomous according to their own Constitutions.

 

This is the way it works for all Orders of nuns in general and it applies specifically for each Order according to their own Constitutions.

 

I don't know personally the PCPAs but I'm sure they will let us know when the nuns in Arizona become autonomous. Meanwhile they are "on their own" only to a certain extent, they still have the supervision and authority of OLAM over them.

 

This is the same case with the nuns in Texas, I think, but it is not the case with the PCPA nuns in Charlotte, NC.

 

The nuns of St. Joseph monastery in NC, have an abbess, that is they are totally autonomous: some younger nuns came from OLAM to revitalize a community that was in decline, but these nuns, new arrivals from OLAM became permanent members of St. Joseph monastery, and one of them was elected abbess. They didn't make a noviciate to become part of St Joseph. So even though we can make the connection to OLAM, they are, canonically, totally on their own in par with OLAM or any other autonomous monastery of the PCPA Order.

 

As for transfer of nuns between the monasteries of this Order, again, they will have that well established in their Constitutions, and it is always easier than a transfer from totally separated/distinct religious institutes, like for instance the Nashville Dominicans and the DMME Dominicans.

These two institutes are totally separate religious congregations even though they have the same Dominican spirit and traditions. But canonically they are different bodies. This means that for a Nashville Dominican to become a DMME, she would have to do a canonical novitiate with the DMME before professing vows as a DMME.

 

On the other hand, the autonomous monasteries of the PCPAs are not different bodies, but different cells/organs of the same body, the Order of Poor Clares of Perpetual Adoration, and to transfer among their monasteries do not need to make a novitiate. This must be stated in their Constitutions.

 

Not sure if this helps to clarify or is only creating more confusion ...

Peace  :nun2:

 

 

Sorry to be annoying with a minor canon law point here....

 

If a perpetually professed religious wishes to transfer to a different religious institute (i.e., to an entirely different community), she would NOT need to make a second novitiate.

 

Assuming she had permission to make the transfer from both her original general superior and the general superior of her new community, and following whatever laws the individual communities themselves have regarding transfers, she would only need to spend a three-year trial period in the new community before she could pronounce perpetual vows there.

 

For a transfer between two monasteries of the same federation, all that is required is the permission of both superiors---but once again, following also whatever internal proper laws the individual monasteries have regarding transfers.

 

(This is all covered in can. 684.) 

 

However, since I think that the DSSME are not yet technically considered a religious community, (and someone please do correct me if I'm wrong on this!) but are rather still only a public association of the faithful, I'm not sure that the law for transferring between religious institutes would apply to them specifically. 

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Quick correction to my last post---for a transfer from one religious institute (or monastery) to another, a religious would need the consent of the communities' general councils (or the monasteries' chapters) in addition to the consent of the major superiors.

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Thank you everyone for your answers! It's a bit confusing, but it makes sense. Do you know what the differences are between the communities? And I'm not sure whether the DSMME are still a public association of the faithful. 

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