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orapronobis

Strictly cloistered religious communities for men?

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orapronobis

​That sounds like an interesting job, TT!

Orapronobis - hello from another UK poster! Glad to see you on here. The fact that you're aware of the possibility of being swayed by some of the beautiful and symbolic things given to those in monastic life - that might be your surest protection against it...

I'm trying to squeeze monastery visits into long weekends and not take days off work if I can help it, so I'm quite envious of your long breaks as a student. Use them well! ;)

​Oh believe me marigold, I do! I spent last Easter in Lourdes and this year I'm going to Walsingham! I'm in Walsingham that much that I'm considering sending out change-of-address cards ;) Plus I get an extra long summer this year due to all my exams being in May and June so I'm hoping to maybe go on a day trip to some monasteries and convents to spend some time in prayer. Does anyone know whether or not the chapel at Kirk Edge is open to the public for prayer?

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beatitude

​Oh believe me marigold, I do! I spent last Easter in Lourdes and this year I'm going to Walsingham! I'm in Walsingham that much that I'm considering sending out change-of-address cards ;) Plus I get an extra long summer this year due to all my exams being in May and June so I'm hoping to maybe go on a day trip to some monasteries and convents to spend some time in prayer. Does anyone know whether or not the chapel at Kirk Edge is open to the public for prayer?

​Student Cross, by any chance? :) You may meet a Phatmasser there.

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IgnatiusofLoyola

Speaking of Walsingham, in case you might be interested, the Dominican Sisters of St. Joseph in Lymington, England sponsor (or help sponsor, not sure) a 50-mile walk/pilgrimage to Walsingham each August. This year the dates will be August 6th-August 9th.

In case you're interested, below is the link to the Sisters' Web site. As you scroll down, there is a notice about this year's pilgrimage on the far left side of the screen, including a booking form. This Community includes TWO Phatmassers/former Phatmassers (although I don't know if they will be participating in this year's pilgrimage).

http://www.dominicansistersofstjoseph.org/

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orapronobis

​Student Cross, by any chance? :) You may meet a Phatmasser there.

​Unfortunately no, the curse of the recent convert! I'm still trying to find my feet with the whole "going to Walsingham as a Catholic" thing. I'm staying with a friend for Holy Week and we're planning to spend the week in silence and contemplation. It will be my first experience of saying the seven-fold office in over a year! Trying to mentally prepare myself for the 5 o clock rising for Matins ;)

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santera

Check out the Camaldolese founded by St. Roumuald, a Benedictine.

http://contemplation.com/

Beautiful setting. Also in Berkeley, CA.

Aside from the Camaldoli, the Trappists and the Carthusians, Benedictines are not strictly cloistered. They leave the monastery for a variety of reasons: health; study; attending conferences and visits for the pope; and they allow visitors under the instructions of Benedict himself. so their idea of 'cloister' is v different from the Carmelites.

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orapronobis

Check out the Camaldolese founded by St. Roumuald, a Benedictine.

http://contemplation.com/

Beautiful setting. Also in Berkeley, CA.

Aside from the Camaldoli, the Trappists and the Carthusians, Benedictines are not strictly cloistered. They leave the monastery for a variety of reasons: health; study; attending conferences and visits for the pope; and they allow visitors under the instructions of Benedict himself. so their idea of 'cloister' is v different from the Carmelites.

​The one downside to all these wonderful communities in the U.S is that since I'm in Europe, I don't know whether or not they'll accept me when the time comes due to the very strict U.S immigration policy. In the E.U I can literally move to any country I want and stay permanently but the language barrier may stop me from entering (I speak only basic French.) :(

 

What is the policy in the U.S in terms of emigrating there to join a community? Is it possible? 

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santera

The Berkeley branch of the Camaldolese Order in the US is at:

http://incarnationmonastery.com/

Great newsletters, including a profession of simple vows.

All in all, it sounds like a great place. Those more desirous can live at Big Sur (AB-solutely beau-tiful!!), and if you read carefully, unless they've changed it, a variety of options for 'enclosure' or hermit-like living is available. After all, they do need people to run the place!

It is my impression that those who enter the US for 'religious' reasons, espec those intending and accepted by  (seriously)  a religious order---have an easier time getting thru immigration.   An entire group of Vietnamese nuns entered and sustain an elderly Carmel in the south--not sure where and don't want to guess.  You will have to contact an IMMIGRATION LAWYER about this AFTER you have contacted the religious order(s) you wish to visit and have been accepted by at least one!   You will have to be of age and fulfill the order's requirements.  All in al, a big process, and I wish you luck.  But keep the Camaldoli in mind!

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truthfinder

Just remembered - Sons of the Holy Redeemer in Scotland - maybe not "cloistered" with grilles and such, but certainly very strict with enclosure and it's a small island that is their's, so there really aren't that many people about from what I understand. 

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marigold

​The one downside to all these wonderful communities in the U.S is that since I'm in Europe, I don't know whether or not they'll accept me when the time comes due to the very strict U.S immigration policy. In the E.U I can literally move to any country I want and stay permanently but the language barrier may stop me from entering (I speak only basic French.) :(

What is the policy in the U.S in terms of emigrating there to join a community? Is it possible? 

It is my impression that those who enter the US for 'religious' reasons, espec those intending and accepted by  (seriously)  a religious order---have an easier time getting thru immigration.   An entire group of Vietnamese nuns entered and sustain an elderly Carmel in the south--not sure where and don't want to guess.  You will have to contact an IMMIGRATION LAWYER about this AFTER you have contacted the religious order(s) you wish to visit and have been accepted by at least one!   You will have to be of age and fulfill the order's requirements.  All in al, a big process, and I wish you luck.  But keep the Camaldoli in mind!

​I did emigrate from the UK to the US, in 2012. It's not the hardest thing in the world, although there was a bit of hanging around waiting for things to come through. I can give you all the gory details if you want. :)

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orapronobis

​I did emigrate from the UK to the US, in 2012. It's not the hardest thing in the world, although there was a bit of hanging around waiting for things to come through. I can give you all the gory details if you want. :)

​Oooh yes please! :) It's just something that has always worried since there are so many amazing communities in the US but I've always been afraid that immigration would hinder my discernment with a community in the US, especially since a lot of communities that are growing and living a traditional religious lifestyle seem to have "all-American" membership.

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orapronobis

The Berkeley branch of the Camaldolese Order in the US is at:

http://incarnationmonastery.com/

Great newsletters, including a profession of simple vows.

All in all, it sounds like a great place. Those more desirous can live at Big Sur (AB-solutely beau-tiful!!), and if you read carefully, unless they've changed it, a variety of options for 'enclosure' or hermit-like living is available. After all, they do need people to run the place!

It is my impression that those who enter the US for 'religious' reasons, espec those intending and accepted by  (seriously)  a religious order---have an easier time getting thru immigration.   An entire group of Vietnamese nuns entered and sustain an elderly Carmel in the south--not sure where and don't want to guess.  You will have to contact an IMMIGRATION LAWYER about this AFTER you have contacted the religious order(s) you wish to visit and have been accepted by at least one!   You will have to be of age and fulfill the order's requirements.  All in al, a big process, and I wish you luck.  But keep the Camaldoli in mind!

​Thank you! :)

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orapronobis

Just remembered - Sons of the Holy Redeemer in Scotland - maybe not "cloistered" with grilles and such, but certainly very strict with enclosure and it's a small island that is their's, so there really aren't that many people about from what I understand. 

​I've heard of this community.They do seem to really have the balance right in terms of contemplation and active work. They are also in my country (technically, I live in England and they live in Scotland) so I imagine that it would be pretty easy to arrange to visit when the time comes. Has anyone had any personal experience with this community?

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Sr Mary Catharine OP

Perhaps you need to actually contact those communities before assuming this because it's not true! The Congregation doesn't necessarily always point out who is from a country other than the US so you can't really tell because a Canadian doesn't always "LOOK" Canadian and the American Irish sister might even look more Irish than the sister from Ireland!

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orapronobis

Perhaps you need to actually contact those communities before assuming this because it's not true! The Congregation doesn't necessarily always point out who is from a country other than the US so you can't really tell because a Canadian doesn't always "LOOK" Canadian and the American Irish sister might even look more Irish than the sister from Ireland!

Very true sister. I acknowledge that the statement was a bit too sweeping. In an international congregation (Like the Dominicans) how easy is it to transfer from one province to the other? Is it a process that lasts a few months or does it take a number of years?

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