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dUSt

Adoration & Bullet Proof Glass Talk

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I've been brainstorming about ways to make Eucharistic adoration more available to the laity. I think the main reason more parishes don't offer adoration is because of the need for someone to always be present while the Blessed Sacrament is exposed.

So... what if there was a way to allow a layperson to properly expose and repose the Eucharist in a safe manner?

My idea was to have a specially built tabernacle. When the door of the tabernacle is opened, the Eucharist is visible inside the tabernacle--behind bullet proof glass. In other words, the Eucharist would be visible, but still protected from theft or vandals.

Of course, proper instructions would have to be posted for any laity that comes to pray, so if they are the first to enter or the last to leave, they would know how to open or close the door of the tabernacle so that the Eucharist is exposed and reposed properly.

Thoughts? I know there has to be a reason why this wouldn't work--otherwise, why hasn't it been done yet?

franciscanheart props this

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I think this idea has been floated before.  It still comes down to the fact that the exposed Eucharist cannot be left without someone there. Further, while the laity can repose the Eucharist if they must leave, they cannot expose the Eucharist - only a priest or deacon can do that. 

While adoration of the exposed blessed sacrament is super beneficial, we must not also forget that adoring Jesus reposed in the tabernacle is also adoration.

Credo in Deum and Spem in alium prop this

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I found this document from the diocese of bismarck about the proper exposition and reposition, for a layperson:

For Exposition

1. The minister does not wear any particular vesture.
2. The altar is prepared in advance. Adoration may take place either with the sacrament in the ciborium, or in a monstrance. If in the ciborium, two candles are lit. If in the monstrance, the monstrance is prepared in advance on the corporal with 4 or 6 candles. (cf. HCWEO 85)
3. The minister brings the sacrament from the tabernacle to the altar, either the ciborium or the luna to be placed in the monstrance.
4. A hymn (such as O Salutaris Hotia) may be sung while the minister places the sacrament on the altar.
5. If the sacrament is exposed in the monstrance, the sacrament should be incensed. (cf. HCWEO 85)

For Reposition

1. A simple devotion or recitation of some portion of the Liturgy of the Hours may take place.
2. Before reposition, a Eucharistic hymn (e.g. Tantum Ergo Sacramentum) may be sung.
3. At the end of the period of adoration, the minister approaches the altar and genuflects. The minister removes the sacrament from the monstrance or takes the ciborium and returns it to the tabernacle and genuflects. An acclamation (like the Divine Praises) may be said. (cf. HCWEO 100)

https://bismarckdiocese.com/documents/Worship/Lay Exposition.pdf

1 minute ago, truthfinder said:

I think this idea has been floated before.  It still comes down to the fact that the exposed Eucharist cannot be left without someone there. Further, while the laity can repose the Eucharist if they must leave, they cannot expose the Eucharist - only a priest or deacon can do that. 

Right. My idea is that the Eucharist would never be exposed without someone there because there would be clear instructions posted at the exit that if you are the last to leave you must shut the tabernacle door.

And I also believe the laity can expose the Eucharist when a priest or deacon is not available.

franciscanheart props this

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Maybe someone can dig up the canons, but this may be heavily dependent on the diocese. My former parish had a perpetual adoration chapel, and it was extremely clear that if you had to leave, you closed the tabernacle and could not expose the Eucharist. You were to phone the priest immediately whatever time of day it was. 

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Just now, truthfinder said:

Maybe someone can dig up the canons, but this may be heavily dependent on the diocese. My former parish had a perpetual adoration chapel, and it was extremely clear that if you had to leave, you closed the tabernacle and could not expose the Eucharist. You were to phone the priest immediately whatever time of day it was. 

Right, but I'm thinking this would be because of the potential of theft. In my scenario, everything is secure and the Eucharist would never be in danger of being stolen--even when the tabernacle door is open--because of the extra layer of bullet proof glass between the door and the Eucharist.

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While I believe that fear of theft is an element of it, it goes further into the nature of leaving Christ unadored.

PhuturePriest props this

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There are a few adoration chapels here that allow laypeople to open a curtain when they come to adore and close it when they leave.  Several have a locked door, and the only way in is by a code, or a doorbell.  

 

This past Christmas, I stopped at one of my favorite adoration chapels, only to find Jesus all alone.  I couldn't stay with Him and didn't know who to call or what to do at that hour of the night.  I was very surprised because that chapel has always had a crowd there.  I really felt bad leaving.  Also, that particular chapel hasn't implemented the locked door policy.  Christ was exposed to no one, and anyone could have walked in and vandalized if they wanted to.  

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But I thought that in Poor Clare monasteries, one of the nuns exposed and reposed the Blessed Sacrament for adoration. And nuns and sisters are lay persons...  I am probably missing some detail.

The newer tabernacles that allow exposition from the front of the tabernacle would be a great alternative and safe. They have a little door on the front that just closes over the luna. I would presume that a  lay person could open or close it... Again, I might be wrong. And then there is the matter of the cost of such a purchase- well in to the 10's of thousands of dollars.

 

 

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If someone is commissioned as an extraordinary minister or their group has the needed permission, they may do exposition/reposition.  If there are not enough people to maintain exposition, there should not be exposition.  The faithful can certainly still come and pray before the tabernacle.

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I am so blessed to have a Perpetual Adoration chapel at my Parish, so close by. But yes, they're always looking for people to be there, especially during the night 

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20 hours ago, dominicansoul said:

There are a few adoration chapels here that allow laypeople to open a curtain when they come to adore and close it when they leave.  Several have a locked door, and the only way in is by a code, or a doorbell.  

OK, so this is what I am questioning... if this is allowed (laypeople opening a curtain), why wouldn't laypeople be allowed to simply open up the door to the tabernacle? A curtain seems way insecure, because anybody could come in and steal the Eucharist. My idea keeps the Eucharist secure at all times, but still allows laypeople to open/close the tabernacle door for viewing.

Also, 

On 2/13/2017 at 10:16 AM, truthfinder said:

While I believe that fear of theft is an element of it, it goes further into the nature of leaving Christ unadored.

Right, that's what I'm saying. Christ would never be left unadored because laypeople would be able to close the tabernacle when they leave.

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I live near a church that was built in the 19th century. It has a rotating tabernacle, divided into two chambers. The Blessed Sacrament in the ciborium was kept in one chamber; the Blessed Sacrament in a (fairly small) monstrance was kept in the other. The outer shell of the tabernacle served as the "door."

The nuns who lived in the convent there would simply turn the tabernacle to expose the Blessed Sacrament in the monstrance when they did adoration.

This picture gives a fairly clear idea of how it worked. It think this would work with dUSt's idea - put some permanent protection in front of it, and attach a handle outside the glass so people could turn the tabernacle to expose the monstrance.

https://www.google.com/search?q=image+rotating+tabernacle&tbm=isch&imgil=6C2EcDEeD9xTnM%3A%3BIpdMxQP4lwv7oM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.alamy.com%252Fstock-photo-epa03789977-women-at-the-tabernacle-night-club-watch-the-rotating-58353755.html&source=iu&pf=m&fir=6C2EcDEeD9xTnM%3A%2CIpdMxQP4lwv7oM%2C_&usg=__Ibu0ER9X1ohKLKyHSQnvRwU6gUk%3D&biw=1024&bih=707&ved=0ahUKEwiUh7LUj5DSAhWI6oMKHdpiDp0QyjcIKw&ei=sD-jWJTvBIjVjwTaxbnoCQ#imgrc=L0Tmozvf0soh8M

Edited by Luigi

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1 hour ago, dUSt said:

OK, so this is what I am questioning... if this is allowed (laypeople opening a curtain), why wouldn't laypeople be allowed to simply open up the door to the tabernacle? A curtain seems way insecure, because anybody could come in and steal the Eucharist. My idea keeps the Eucharist secure at all times, but still allows laypeople to open/close the tabernacle door for viewing.

 

I guess my problem is, I'm not sure whether this truly is allowed. Just because things are done or permitted by a diocese doesn't mean it's actually allowed. I wonder if we've gotten too attached to formal exposition. I certainly value it, but you do just as much adoring when Jesus is reposed in the Tabernacle. 

Maybe we should work on churches being open more hours and not locked. 

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1 minute ago, truthfinder said:

I certainly value it, but you do just as much adoring when Jesus is reposed in the Tabernacle. 

I question this statement. By this logic, what is the purpose of a monstrance? Why have adoration where we can actually see Jesus at all?

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1 hour ago, dUSt said:

Why have adoration where we can actually see Jesus at all?

Now that is an interesting question.

I would guess that it is to help us focus our thoughts or attention?

But if you could focus without that help, wouldn't it be the same?

I wonder, because we "see" Jesus through the eyes of faith, more so than through our physical eyes.

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1 hour ago, Peace said:

Now that is an interesting question.

I would guess that it is to help us focus our thoughts or attention?

But if you could focus without that help, wouldn't it be the same?

I wonder, because we "see" Jesus through the eyes of faith, more so than through our physical eyes.

But now we start undermining the whole Real Presence and purpose of Jesus being actually physically present. 

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47 minutes ago, dUSt said:

But now we start undermining the whole Real Presence and purpose of Jesus being actually physically present. 

Maybe. I am not so knowledgeable about this, but my understanding is that the Church does not equate the Real Presence with a "physical presence".

I don't think we can really say that Jesus is physically contained within the tabernacle or that we physically feel Jesus  when we take communion.

Jesus is truly present, but not necessarily physically present in the same way that bodies or objects are present before us.

If you google Catholic, "Real Presence" and "physical presence" you'll find a bunch of things that discuss this topic much better than I can.

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Christ is totally, actually, physically present in the Blessed Sacrament, His whole flesh and blood, His whole body and soul, His whole humanity and divinity. When we eat the Blessed Sacrament we eat Christ's actual body, flesh as well as hair and finger nails. It would be incorrect/error to believe Christ is truly present without His actual human physical nature.

Short version: Christ is totally and physically present Body, Soul and Divinity under the physical appearance of bread and wine.

Archaeology cat and DominicanHeart prop this

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Like all things, I suppose it's how you define the word "physical". I've never even thought twice about using that word because when I say "physically" present, I mean, really present, or actually present, or substantially present, or tangibly present. Like, Christ's actual body is there, in front of me.

Now, if you think of "physically" as something you can see, hear or smell with your senses, then no, I suppose He is not "physically" present in that way, as the Eucharist still looks, smells and tastes like bread and wine.

Which makes me wonder... we don't put emphasis on how the Eucharist tastes, or smells, or feels, so why do we place emphasis on Him being seen during adoration? Maybe it's not so much about being able to actual "see" Him, but rather, being able to see Him just so we know He is there?

So, kinda like St Thomas Aquinas said about no bread or wine can remain after transubstantiation, otherwise Catholics would be adoring a piece of bread. Maybe we open the tabernacle to see Jesus, so we're not in danger of accidentaly adoring an empty tabernacle. haha

KnightofChrist props this

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