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eternitythinker

Vocation in another country

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eternitythinker

I always wanted to ask this question.

Lets say you have vocation for example to carthusian order, cistercian and so on .... etc.

But the problem is that order you have been called to is in another country with another lanquage.

 

lets say you want to go to carthusians order in slovenia but you live in usa. 

how hard do you think i would be to learn new lanquage ?  Do you think it would bring the expected fruit?

Would you to another country to the order you have been called to, but it is in another country ? 

 

Last question: What does ,, internation community means ? 

 

( Sorry for my english, iam from europe non english speaking country.

 

thanks

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Lou

Hi!

There is a Cistercian community on Tautra Island in Norway who know that now, as a fairly new foundation, they may not receive so many Norwegian vocations. It is a foundation from an American community so most of their community are American! But, they are building up this foundation in Norway and therefore are committed to teaching Norwegian to their novices.

That said, culturally moving countries can be difficult, especially discerning between what is 'convent/priory culture' and what the genuine culture of the country IS!

God provides though, and if he is calling you overseas, then he will guide you. I know a missionary sister from the UK who entered a Spanish community without a word of Spanish. She had an amazing life there. 

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Antonella

Let's say you want to be a Cistercian. There are many Cistercians in many European countries. Maybe try the ones in the U.K or Ireland, since you already know English. If you are  called to the Carthusians it's a little more tricky, since they are only in 2-3 countries. Carthusian nuns are in France and Italy. You can look in to those languages, chose the  one you feel more comfortable with, and start learning it.  

Learning another language isn't that difficult and since you are not sure if you are going to enter there, you need to know just the basic stuff. I don't know what you mean by "the expected fruit", but mastering French doesn't mean you are called to enter a French Convent.:)

I actually want to enter a Community in another country. I speak the official language of that country so that's not a problem for me. It is far more difficult to learn the "unofficial" language of the Community. :hehe2:  

The Community in Tautra is great! They are very international. They have sisters from Poland, Belgium, Vietnam etc. I think they all speak English, but they pray in Norwegian. 

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Sister Leticia

Welcome to this forum!

There is more to entering in a different country than simply learning the language. You would need to discern with this community, and while it's possible to have Skype conversations and emails, you do need to visit the community you feel called to, to spend time with them, not just once. Depending on distance this could be expensive, especially if you're visiting another continent.

Then, as Lou has said, you could also be moving to a completely different culture, and might find that adjustment difficult. There's always a certain culture shock that comes with entering religious life - because it, in itself, is a kind of different culture - but it's a bit easier and milder if you're within your own societal culture.   

There's the issue of visas, and the possible effect of uncertainty about your stay in the new country. It's hard to settle, and focus on your formation process, if you're only allowed in on a time-limited visa, which needs renewing, especially if you had trouble getting the visa in the first place. 

You also need to consider the effect on your family, and how much you would see each other, especially if you join a strictly enclosed community on a different continent. Parents who are healthy and middle-aged when their child enters - and therefore able to get on a plane to visit - could, 10 or 15 years later, be ageing and ill, and no longer able to travel long distances. Would you be able to visit your family if they could no longer visit you, or is this a sacrifice you - and they - must make?

If someone feels called to a particular order which cannot be found in their own or a neighbouring country, I'd say thorough discernment is crucial, precisely because of the extra implications. You really need to be sure this is about much more than the attraction we often feel when we read about a way of following Jesus which is wonderfully radical, deeply contemplative etc - but which isn't necessarily what God is calling us to. 

Blessings on your discernment!

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juchu

I joined a community in a different country with a different language. I joke quite often that God has been very creative, I had studied a lot of different languages, but not the one I needed to know!

But I am in Europe and here the countries are "closer" - but still it takes a 8 hour train ride to my family. But I guess some people in the USA or in South America have the same distances within their own countries....

I would say that it also makes a difference if the community you are joining already has other members of different cultures and "is used" that it takes time to adapt to the language. And that there is an discernment to make between how to "adapt" to religious life and how to "adapt" to the new country and language. And it is really a big blessing to live in an inter-cultural community. Especially in todays world, where migration is so fast. I recently read an article about religious being experts in "living together" in our multicultural world, to be open to receive and to give. My culture is not the "best" or the only one.

For me not knowing well the language (I did after having been here as a volunteer and aspirant take some classes back at home) was also a very good experience which helped me to enter more into poverty - not knowing how to say things, not being able to be as "eloquent" and to define myself by my intellect ... It helped me to "let  go" of my "performing / perfect self" and simply by myself. And to make the experience that I am accepted like this and not because of what I am able to do.

 

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