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puellapaschalis

The Benedictines Strike Back

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puellapaschalis
Right, I'm going to do something about the chronic domination of Dominicans, Poor Clares and Carmelites on here. Or at least, I'm praying to see if that's what God wants, because I'm sure he's got plans for the Vocation Station and they'd better include OSBs :cool:

In a little less than a month I'm going on a visit to St. Hildegard's Abbey, in Rüdesheim am Rhein in Germany (it's about an hour to the west of Frankfurt). The English section of their website can be found here: [url="http://www.abtei-st-hildegard.de/english/"]http://www.abtei-st-hildegard.de/english/[/url] Having said that, if you can read German it's worth reading that part of the site too, because I think they have some material on there that they've not translated.

This has begun pretty early, mainly because I'm rather excited about it and need to have some kind of outlet. I only live a short distance from my cathedral here and beleive me, if I could get away with it I'd be in there about now (at 1am, tee hee!) blabbering to Christ how excited I was. But alas...you good people will have to put up with me instead :yahoo:

However, this does mean that I'll need some way of holding your interest until 29th April. I propose to post, each day, a portion of the Rule of St. Benedict and invite you all to discuss it. Such a portion is read out each day in each Benedictine House at the Chapter meeting (the portion is usually a chapter of the Rule, hence the name) :book: We won't get through it all by then, not by a long stretch, but it'll hopefully give you all some insight into Benedictine life.

And to totally throw my English reserve out of the window for a few moments: [b]SQUEEEEEE!!!![/b]

Ahem.

Love and prayers,

PP

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OLAM Dad
Benedictines? Hmmmmm, I seem to recall an order by that name... :scratchhead:

Just Kidding.

Ich habe in Deutschland gewohnen. Sehr schon. (sorry, I don't know how to add an umlaut to the o) :) Edited by OLAM Dad

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HisChild
:lol_above: Squeeeeeee? :lol_pound:


I'm so excited for you! I absolutely LOVE their chapel! How magnificent, those monasteries in Europe who are still so stately and beautiful.

And see, there's a young woman who is from the US. How wonderful is that?

Will you have to know German to live there? Perhaps you already do.

Je ne parle pas allemand.

:unsure:

That's just wonderful and I will keep you in prayers. . . .


:woot: so many people entering or discerning religious life :woot: I never knew it existed. I'm just so tickled!

:blush:

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passionheart
[quote name='puellapaschalis' date='Mar 30 2006, 06:06 PM']Right, I'm going to do something about the chronic domination of Dominicans, Poor Clares and Carmelites on here. Or at least, I'm praying to see if that's what God wants, because I'm sure he's got plans for the Vocation Station and they'd better include OSBs :cool:

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Hey PP,

Since you suggested that we look at the rule at St. Benedict remember that St. Benedict's monastic rule influenced the monastic nature of Domincans, and Poor Clares. I can't speak for the Carmelites and I invite any comments from those in the House of Carmel.

When I was in the Domincan monastery, we learned about the influence of the rule of St. Benedict on the early nun foundations. As you know, St. Clare stayed with Benedictines before the house for her was established. When she writing her rule, some of her experience with the good nuns was incorporated.

So St. Benedict was alway here but shall we say undercover :cool:

DM

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HisChild
Puella, now you have to be really clever and add a countdown to your thread. . .It's pretty inane, to be honest, but kind of fun as well. :cool:

You can do it at [url="http://www.timeanddate.com/counters"]http://www.timeanddate.com/counters[/url]


I mean, you don't 'have' to, that came out wrong, but it is a suggestion. It will make you and those of us around you even more excited! LOL And then there will be more of that 'squeeeeee' that you mentioned earlier. ;)

God love you,

D.

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puellapaschalis
[color=blue]28 days, 11 hours[/color]

[quote]March 31
[b]Chapter 49: The Observance of Lent[/b]

Although at all times the life of a monk ought to be a Lenten observance, yet since few have the strength for this, we encourage all during these days of Lent to keep themselves in all purity of life, and to wash away the neglected matters of other times during these holy days. This we will do worthily if we abstain from all vices and give ourselves to prayer with tears, reading, compunction of heart, and abstinence. Therefore during these days let us augment somewhat our usual quota of service through private prayers and abstinence from food and drink, so thateach may offer, above his appointed measure and of his own free will, something to God in the joy of the Holy Spirit: that is, by withholding from his body something of food, drink, sleep, excessive talking, ridiculing; and thus awaiting holy Easter with the joy of spiritual desire.

Everyone is, however, to make known to his abbot what he offers, and do it with his prayer and according to his will, because what is done without permiion of the spiritual father will be attributed to presumption and vainglory, and will merit no reward. Therefore everything is to be according to the will of the abbot.[/quote]

It's a nice coincidence (or Godincidence) that the reading from the Rule today, at the beginning of my countdown, is this one. The kicker for me is the second paragraph: the exhortion to do all in obedience to the abbot is what distinguishes this from the Lent I live now: as a single woman living independently as an expatriate, it seems - outwardly at least - that I answer to no-one about my Lenten "resolutions". Some are noticeable to the outside world, others are not; it is my choice to inform my parish priest or not.

But this paragraph is what draws the members of a monastic community together: all are to let the superior know what his personal measures are for this holy season. It prevents against excessive introspection, where a monastic becomes so wrapped up in his own Lenten pilgrimage that he loses sight of the fact that he lives in a community, travelling [i]together[/i] to eternal life. Moreover, if the abbot knows of everyone's plans for Lent, he will be better placed to care for the community, and if needs be will then be able to suggest more approprite practises.

Denise: I don't know if I'd need to be a good German speaker for entrance at St. Hildegard's but it'll be one of the things I ask. I speak a little bit of German, having studied it off and on for several years. In addition I already speak Dutch, so that might help.

I think the picture you saw which you called the chapel is in fact the church. For the Office the nuns have a smaller choir which I believe is to the left of the sanctuary as you look at it.

VeniteAdoremus: hoera!

(VA is a great mate of mine; if/when I enter, she'll be the person to keep people here up to date with stuff :cool: )

Donna-Marie: ha ha, yes! St. Benedict, the undercover cop of everything Western and vaguely monastic. I'm not sure that Carmel's rules will show much Benedictine influence, originating as they did in the Holy Land. It would be interesting to study the two, though. Given that Carmel started where it did, perhaps we'd expect some Basilian influence?

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OLAM Dad
[quote name='VeniteAdoremus' date='Mar 31 2006, 03:43 AM']So, there I am. Happy? :)
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VA, WELCOME! :welcome:

I'm glad that pp told us who you were. I hope in the future your posts aren't so cryptic. :)

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puellapaschalis
[quote name='OLAM Dad' date='Mar 31 2006, 02:50 PM']VA, WELCOME!  :welcome:

I'm glad that pp told us who you were.  I hope in the future your posts aren't so cryptic.  :)
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To be fair I bullied her a little :(

PP

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puellapaschalis
[quote name='OLAM Dad' date='Mar 31 2006, 03:11 PM']You're a true friend, you know what's good for her.  ;)
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I know, I can be rather annoying like that!

Hm, I should start brushing up on my German - I need to buy a train ticket between Frankfurt and Rüdeshiem, after all. My train tickets to Frankfurt are already booked, and in fact have been sitting in my desk drawer, taunting me, for about a month.

OLAM Dad, whereabouts in Germany were you stationed?

Love and prayers,

PP Edited by puellapaschalis

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puellapaschalis
[quote name='PCPA2Be' date='Mar 31 2006, 12:29 AM']:lol_above:  Squeeeeeee?  :lol_pound:
[/quote]

I find this very, very amusing. Is a squeee worthy of such laughter? ^_^

[quote name='PCPA2Be' date='Mar 31 2006, 12:29 AM']And see, there's a young woman who is from the US.  How wonderful is that?
[/quote]

Actually, I believe there're at least two Americans in the community. Sr. Scholastica whose Profession you can read about on the website is one. Further, in the back of [url="http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0747273987/qid%3D1143822873/202-5722491-2256625"]this book[/url], Fiona Maddocks (the author) conducts an interview with Sr. Ancilla Feerling. From that interview I get the impression that Sr. Ancilla is American; the interview took place in October 1999, at which point Sr. Ancilla had been there for twenty-seven years, and the text says that she entered when she was thirty. I wonder if there are other foreigners there, or if the community is mainly German.

If anyone else has read that book, by the way, I'd be interested to hear your thoughts about it too. Personally I found it an excellent non-theological introduction to Hildegard's life and work, non-sensationalist (as is the danger with someone like Hildegard) and remarkably well-balanced. It kind of restored my faith in the ability of non-Catholics to write decent stuff!

[quote name='PCPA2Be' date='Mar 31 2006, 12:29 AM']Je ne parle pas allemand.
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Et j'ai oublié tout de mon français!

Love and prayers,

PP

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HisChild
[quote name='puellapaschalis' date='Mar 31 2006, 09:42 AM']I find this very, very amusing. Is a squeee worthy of such laughter?  ^_^

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Oh yes, coming from one so reserved as yourself. ..



[quote]Et j'ai oublié tout de mon français![/quote]

Quel domage! Mais je veux parler Italiano.

;)

God bless you

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puellapaschalis
[color=blue]27 days, 1 hour[/color]
[quote]April 1
[b]Chapter 50: Brothers who work far from the oratory or are on a journey[/b]

Brothers who work some distance away and are not able to come at the proper hour to the oratory (and the abbot judges whether this is the case) should perform the Work of God there where they are working, bending their knees in reverent awe. Similarly, those sent on a journey should not allow the appointed hours to pass them by; instead, insofar as they can, they should perform them there, thus not neglecting to offer their quota of service.[/quote]

So...praying the Office isn't something I can reserve for the times when I'm in a "suitable" place, with the "proper" things around me (like my breviary) or even when I'm in a "decent" frame of mind. When the time is right - hence an extension to the notion of obedience to the bell - I must pray. I have ten fingers, so I can pray a Rosary. I've been praying the Office long enough to have memorised some of the psalms, so I can pray one at a suitable time. But what speaks to me from this Chapter is that no matter whether I feel like it or not, I must pray. I think this is what distinguishes the Christian life from any other variety: we are called to grow and nurture and strengthen our bond, our personal relationship with God, and do so constantly, at every moment of the day.

ETA: I realise that this is really very superficial, but I thought I'd post a link to a photo of St. Hildegard's: [url="http://www.trekearth.com/gallery/Europe/Germany/photo219725.htm"]http://www.trekearth.com/gallery/Europe/Ge...photo219725.htm[/url] Enjoy! :lol_grin: Edited by puellapaschalis

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