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#41 osapientia

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Posted 17 May 2010 - 09:24 AM

I just got back from a two week visit with the Hermits of Our Lady of Mount Carmel in Chester, New Jersey. I'm going back soon to enter as a postulant. even though pretty much anyone can walk in and have their personal thoughts about this particular eremitical life, I'd like to be someone (who hopefully might be called there) to put in some good thoughts:

Anyone who feels like they've been discerning forever or have journeyed long, will show me the compassion and hope that I thirst for :rolleyes:. so I've been discerning for three years now. I like to say that I was first a Marian Devotee of ST. Louis de Montforts' works, and I will always be to my last breath!then I entered the Poor Clare Colettine order for 1yr and 3 months.then I entered the Discalced Carmelite order for 4 months.

although the contemplative orders had similarities (apart from their unique charism,ie: Franciscan, Carmelite) I found it hard to devote myself wholeheartedly to both their charism because I didn't yet have a personal calling. what I did have was a desire, but not a "calling."from what I've observed from the stories of our saints handed down to us, a calling is ultimately very personal and it can take many journeys to find it. but once it's found than it doesn't matter so much WHERE one is, but WHAT that one does at the moment. hopefully what we do according to our calling, is good and fruitful, whether others who are standing in the same place with us are not called to act in the same way. just like St. Teresa of Avila, Lucia from Fatima, Mother Teresa,St. Francis they all found their calling fruitfully: St. Teresa had to leave her original community to live the Primitive Rule as a Discalced Carmelite because of God's calling (not just because of interior inspirations) which was so ingrained in her that not even the most prudent and wise oppositions could stop her. and the fruit is manycontemplative vocations and saints faithful to the Primitive Rule.

Likewise with Lucia of Fatima, who was not originally a Discalced Carmelite but a Sister of St. Dorothy for over 20yrs, which was a beautiful testimony that she entered Carmel (with papal approval) seeing that she had longago seen the vision of Our Lady of Mount Carmel with the Child Jesus and the Scapular--I'm not sure why she didn't enter Carmel first, but GOODNESS who can refute the fruits of her journey.
And with Mother Teresa who was a Sister of Loreto before she heard the "call within a call" from the poor.
And St. Francis who became everything perfectly (merchant, chivalric soldier, a beggar, a preacher, a saint etc) but he was called to start the "Friars Minor" to rebuild God's Church, even though God revealed to Him in the beginning that the Order would suffer disunity, but would produce many saints and last to the end of the world.

well anyway, I think I might find my calling here at the Hermits of Our Lady of Mount Carmel. yes, there are trials here and in every foundation of the Church. the trials might be small or grave or nothing at all,depending on the individual who encounters it-especially if that individual is called to encounter it and to persevere by Grace. in other words, as for the psychological aspects of the life, that is the founder's call and may it be her salvaton, BUT it is not in the constitution approved by the Church to take on her mentality. the life itself calls for the fidelity of each individual hermit, and if they should fail, then God forgive them and may He forgive us for the many infidelities we have, and May God Be Blessed for His loving fidelity to us, and may we learn by His Grace to be faithful to Him even in times when we are judged as unfaithful.

If it is true that the heaven rejoice exceedingly over one sinner who converts than over the countless just who are already converted, then what's in the"conversion" that seems to hold it's prominence over "fidelity?" it has to be mercy. God's Mercy is Love, but it's necessarily more significant than Love, because we're a fallen race, and to destroy sin by rendering from it truth joy and love, is the greatest Glory of God. If the conversion of a sinner is so joyous, how much more regarded is the ONE who converted that sinner. Anyone can stress social, psychological, spiritual, religious, moral, devotional aspects of life. The Government does that, the Church does that, all religions and sects do that. But if it doesn't render God's Mercy from those who hear it, then it's meaningless, accept to the one's who are faithful to it. BUt Jesus and His Church Came to save sinners not the righteous alone. Even Jesus endured the doctrinal and moral and political stress of his own peoplethat literally nailed him to the cross, but his call was greater than the law. His call was to love God his Father, and love us to save usfrom sin.

It's terrible that those discerning religiuos/priestly vocations undergo so many pressures and stresses from others.May God give us all, the grace to endure and love each other in order to render His Mercy always. Blessed are those who have continual conversions of the heart, mind, and body, as suppose to those who've "never" done anything so wrong on earth ( 1 John 1:10 If we say we have not sinned, we make him a liar, and his word is not in us. ). Blessed even more is He and those who cause conversions because of Him. Blessed are those who rejoice in God's Mercy and the willful and joyful conversions of sinners.

The foundation and constitutions of the Hermits of Our Lady of Mount Carmel was blessed and approved by the Church, they have provoked much conversions to souls who've met them. They have converted even more so by their tender prayers and loving sacrifices for the world than by their words and wisdom of the things of Heaven and the things of earth.

I don't assume that I won't suffer much if I have a "calling" to this holy place, but I feel like I'd be able to persevere. The disciplines of the life are enough to provoke interior mortifications. And although each hermit and every person is unique in their thoughts and in their personal mission/calling, I think it's each of our Christian duty to win each other with Love always, and if we can't than we can atleast die in Love. Our Lord converted ALL sinners in ALL of TIME by His Loving Death than by His 3 years of public preaching and refuting of lesser laws and by healings and miracles. Doesn't that make anyone just want to die out of love for each other? :sadder: I would hope that to LIVE a sacrificial life in any vocation is worth more than wanting others to live a sacrificial life for you. In other words, it's beautiful that people (non-believers, believers, philanthropist, atheist, etc) look with respect on the sacrifice of Jesus, the priests, the nuns, and Christians for the world's intercession and redemption, but it's more beautiful if we could share it with them and if we could strengthen each other. Contemplatives pray for people, yes, but their prayers are meant to bring out the sacrificial love capable in each soul that will render true and victorious conversion!......


I may not have much experience in religious life, or have been committed to one faithfully. But the Love of God is written in all hearts, and it can't be denied when it is proclaimed. I did mean well with this post reply, so I hope no one takes offence...but that they rejoice with me in my hopeful discernment, and I encourage others to get to know the Hermits of Our Lady of Mount Carmel for the Mercy God has shown them and those who know them.

God's blessing to you on your journey, in your postulancy and beyond. I love the Hermits in Chester, NJ....been there a number of times.

Pax,
Osap

#42 Mary Veronica

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Posted 17 May 2010 - 10:58 AM

I don't know much about the Hermits of OL of Mt Carmel but spent two months next door at the Hermits of Bethlehem. Father Romano, the desert father of the Bethlehem hermits, donated the land to the Hermits of OL of Mt C. They use the same driveway but you go straight ahead for the Bethlehem Hermits or turn right for OL of Mt C Hermits. If you happen to stop by next door at Bethlehem for any reason, give my best to Father Romano please. I heard from him recently but will always be grateful to him for his kindness while I was there.

I do wish you well in your journey and will pray for you. I hope that in addition to the trials you describe, you also experience the joy of God's love and the peace that comes from the guidance of the Holy Spirit.

May Our Lady watch over you and keep you close to Jesus always. :pray:


I didn't get to meet Fr. Romano, but I hope to when I go back to New Jersey. I will give him your best regards, although I don't know your name, I will let him know that he will always have your gratitude. Thank you for your blessings and good hopes for me! I wish you the same in Jesus and Mary!:lol:

#43 nunsense

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Posted 17 May 2010 - 06:54 PM

I didn't get to meet Fr. Romano, but I hope to when I go back to New Jersey. I will give him your best regards, although I don't know your name, I will let him know that he will always have your gratitude. Thank you for your blessings and good hopes for me! I wish you the same in Jesus and Mary!Posted Image



Oh yeah, the name! :lol: That would help! My name is Annie.

I needed several references in order to do the live-in at Carmel and Father Romano was kind enough to provide one, even though I haven't seen him in over two years, so I am very grateful to him.

I hope you do get to meet him since he is going to be your neighbor and yet you won't see him again once you are inside living a hermit life! I'm pretty sure you will hear their bells for Mass though, because we could hear the bells from the Carmelite hermits when they rang theirs.

When are you going back?

#44 Mary Veronica

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Posted 17 May 2010 - 07:27 PM

Oh yeah, the name! :lol: That would help! My name is Annie.

I needed several references in order to do the live-in at Carmel and Father Romano was kind enough to provide one, even though I haven't seen him in over two years, so I am very grateful to him.

I hope you do get to meet him since he is going to be your neighbor and yet you won't see him again once you are inside living a hermit life! I'm pretty sure you will hear their bells for Mass though, because we could hear the bells from the Carmelite hermits when they rang theirs.

When are you going back?


Great! well, I might see him if he presides over Mass! and yes, I did hear their bells from the hermitage cabin! Thanks Annie, my name is Fame btw. I'm going back hopefully around this August. of course, everything sort of depends on providence and spiritual direction of superiors. what's kind is that the hermits said they would pay for my flight back :huh:, I'm from Chicago, IL. it's nice when others let us experience an overwhelming trait of our Heavenly Father: like His graciousness <3 ...... makes anyone want to pass it on.

#45 Mary Veronica

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Posted 17 May 2010 - 07:30 PM

God's blessing to you on your journey, in your postulancy and beyond. I love the Hermits in Chester, NJ....been there a number of times.

Pax,
Osap


do you still go there? it'll be neat to meet you! if ever... well, God knows :detective:...i hope we do someday :lol: even if it's spiritual

Edited by Mary Veronica, 17 May 2010 - 07:33 PM.


#46 sistersintigo

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 08:52 PM

I have thought about this as a vocation. I think I have mostly looked into the Carthusians as a life of hermit-spirituality. However, there are not any American nun Carthusians. I have written to one of the houses in Europe and while I did get a great answer back, one has to speak the language (of the country) fluently.

I have also looked into the Bethlehem Sisters, too as well as the Carmelites in Port Tobacco because they have individual hermitages.


I learned second- or third-hand of a recent thing. It seems that Ireland has had numerous women go to continental Europe to try the charterhouses for Carthusian women, and I did hear of one who entered, and stayed, in Italy. What I didn't know was that there were so many Irish women who tried the Carthusian life, then when the culture clash and so on was more than they could tolerate, turned around and left the Carthusian monasteries. So much so, that there is at least one prominent Carthusian monk at Parkminster who wants to have a community of Carthusian women in Ireland. That perked up my ears!

#47 DameAgnes

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Posted 06 June 2010 - 01:10 PM

I learned second- or third-hand of a recent thing. It seems that Ireland has had numerous women go to continental Europe to try the charterhouses for Carthusian women, and I did hear of one who entered, and stayed, in Italy. What I didn't know was that there were so many Irish women who tried the Carthusian life, then when the culture clash and so on was more than they could tolerate, turned around and left the Carthusian monasteries. So much so, that there is at least one prominent Carthusian monk at Parkminster who wants to have a community of Carthusian women in Ireland. That perked up my ears!


That is very interesting. Please do keep us informed on this!

#48 ortus

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Posted 08 June 2010 - 02:12 AM

It is very interesting reading through this thread.

I noticed that the most obvious omission from the discussion are the Camaldolese Benedictines who are the most ancient eremitical Order of the Church. The monks are divided into two congregations - the Camaldolese Benedictines and the Camaldolese Hermits of Monte Corona - and both of them have houses in the US. The Camaldolese nuns also have a US house in Windsor, New York.

A couple of years ago I was lucky enough to spend a week staying within the cloister in the monastery at Camaldoli. The monastery has been there for almost a thousand years and has a stunning setting in the forests of the Appenine mountains. It was an absolutely incredible experience and I had a real sense of the timeless and seamless life of prayer of the Church.

I am not sure if anyone has read the book 'Nazarena: An American Anchoress'. It tells the story of an american woman who spent many years living as a recluse in the Camaldolese nuns monastery in Rome. She lived in one room within the monastery for many years with just a small window that allowed her to see the altar in the Church below the room. If you do get a chance to read it, I would certainly recommend it as it is an amazing and inspiring story.

#49 Mary Veronica

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Posted 10 June 2010 - 08:56 PM

It is very interesting reading through this thread.

I noticed that the most obvious omission from the discussion are the Camaldolese Benedictines who are the most ancient eremitical Order of the Church. The monks are divided into two congregations - the Camaldolese Benedictines and the Camaldolese Hermits of Monte Corona - and both of them have houses in the US. The Camaldolese nuns also have a US house in Windsor, New York.

A couple of years ago I was lucky enough to spend a week staying within the cloister in the monastery at Camaldoli. The monastery has been there for almost a thousand years and has a stunning setting in the forests of the Appenine mountains. It was an absolutely incredible experience and I had a real sense of the timeless and seamless life of prayer of the Church.

I am not sure if anyone has read the book 'Nazarena: An American Anchoress'. It tells the story of an american woman who spent many years living as a recluse in the Camaldolese nuns monastery in Rome. She lived in one room within the monastery for many years with just a small window that allowed her to see the altar in the Church below the room. If you do get a chance to read it, I would certainly recommend it as it is an amazing and inspiring story.


And people question why few are drawn to priestly/religious life? It seems that it takes a lot of heart to live in a room with a small window and ever-gazing at Our Lord. only by God' grace, sigh....well, God Bless our future saints and those who love them <3

#50 sistersintigo

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Posted 10 December 2010 - 10:49 AM

Regarding Sr. Irene Gibson:
get a look at this!
http://www.advertise...o/article/4933#


The former County Mayo hermit now sells her icons from Dublin on EBay.

Icons written by Sr. Irene




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