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  2. I found this information on the website of another Poor Clare monastery. The Memphis Poor Clares don't have any information about it on their web page, but they haven't update that page in quite a long time. ############################################################################### Our Sisters Marguerite and Claudia from Memphis reached out to us in the spring Their monastery, which was founded in 1932, and established a flourishing community in Guatemala in 1981, is now down to only four members. The decision has been made for two of the sisters to go to Cincinnati, however, Sisters Marguerite and Claudia asked if they could visit us during this time of decision making and change. Both sisters have been with us for several days with plans to return. We have extended an invitation for them to join us after they close their monastery so, together, we can discern what will be their next step. In the meantime, some of our sisters have been traveling to Memphis to assist them in accomplishing this huge task of closing their home.
  3. sr.christinaosf

    website / domain ideas

    Brain-storming: is our current domain of www.stannesguesthome.org too long and difficult for people to spell accurately? Countless times, I've had to spell out our website or email address and found it cumbersome. Is there an 'e' in Ann(e) or not? Is there a period after st? Is there an apostrophe in Anne's? These questions, along with the length have their drawbacks. Now that we're using the umbrella term of St. Anne's Living Center, to include both Basic Care (St. Anne's Guest Home) and subsidized housing (St. Anne's Housing for the Elderly), does anyone have any good ideas for a short/simple domain name that might be better for people? I was thinking, even, of something like: traditionofcare.org . Thanks.
  4. Jane_Doe2

    Evangelising On LDS Forum

    (I'm just trying to be pithy for this response, let me know if you want any elaboration) LDS Christians very openly embrace the fact that we don't know everything-- to quote the Articles of Faith: "We believe all that God has revealed, all that He does now reveal, and we believe that He will yet reveal many great and important things pertaining to the Kingdom of God." (emphasis mine, https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/study/scriptures/pgp/a-of-f/1?lang=eng). So there are unknowns. Any possible past of the Father's would be in that category. And there are folks that have a variety of speculative views on it-- speculations that aren't remotely central to the Gospel and we're not going to waste pulpit time over. None of these involve an "origin" the way you're thinking of it. Remember, the Father, like the Son, is eternal. The Son having a history before today (life before being born of Mary, living a mortal life, accesending, etc) doesn't in anyway change His divinity.
  5. Seven77

    Evangelising On LDS Forum

    This is what I would like to know, Jane. I have read through your responses but I do not seem to see a clear-cut answer to these questions. Specifically, you mentioned "the Father's past." What does this mean? Do you believe that the Father had a past? Do some Mormons believe that the Father had some sort of Past? Are Mormons free to speculate whether or not the Father had a past life? By Speaking Of Some Sort of Past pertaining to the Father, Are You Implying That the Father had an origin? If the Father had a past, did the Son Ever have a past That Was Different Andd Separate ?
  6. BarbaraTherese

    Neighbour very ill

    My next door neighbour had a laryngectomy around 11 years ago. She is almost 81 and has heart problems and diabetes. She has been admitted to hospital with pneumonia and is very ill. Please pray.
  7. little2add

    affordable universal coverage

    Basic affordable heath care should be available to all, no question. Including birth control, free abortion for healthy viable fetus is not or should not (can not) be part of any such plan.
  8. BarbaraTherese

    Quotations that Motivate & Inspire

  9. BarbaraTherese

    The Lungs of Our Planet are burning

    The Amazon, the lungs of our planet, is on fire. "Many of the fires are thought to have been started deliberately, with suspicion falling on farmers who may benefit by having more available land. Mr Bolsonaro has scorned environmental activists and declared staunch support for the clearing of areas of the Amazon for agriculture and mining. Experts and campaigners say his administration has given a green light to rainforest destruction. Environmental groups held protests in cities across Brazil on Friday to demand action to combat the fires, and protesters gathered outside the Brazilian embassies around the world." https://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-49452789 Amazon fires: Ten of your questions answered In graphics: How bad are the Amazon fires? What is the 'historic' EU-Mercosur trade deal? ............each of the above three are linked in the article. Prayer for the Amazon Fires. There are many ways of praying including saying a brief rote prayer, especially the Our Father which Jesus gave us, and then uniting that intention to our days and efforts to live The Gospel. I might even never think of my intention again, but Jesus does - and Our Lady, Mother and Queen with the whole of Heaven remember too and continue to pray for us all and our intentions. If necessary, The Holy Spirit will bring back to our minds what needs to come back to our minds. The Holy Spirit: Gift, Counsellor, Advocate and Helper I once asked a very holy priest how he remembers all he wants to pray for. He said that he simply tells Jesus he is praying for all he wants to pray for and all he should pray for. It eventually internalised for me and I was able to abandon my Intentions Book which had grown far too long to pray every day. At the time, I would agonise with guilt if I did not pray every single intention every single day.........obviously I was scrupulous at the time and cured in the Confessional by Father saying "Be happy" at that very moment, scruples and a burden just vanished.
  10. BarbaraTherese

    Cardinal Pell's Appeal dismissed

    I am in another state of Australia to Victoria. I have never had anything to do with CArdinal Pell directly or indirectly. I never met him or even came close. What follows is only how he struck fallible and broken me quite personally from photos and television and before the breaking of the scandals. He always struck me as a cold and rigid, formidable, sort of man- not only in tone but in appearance, which was imposing. He was tall and quite well built. I found him intimidating in appearance and voice tone. I never saw him smile. When he was promoted to the Vatican Bank I think it was, I did think it would suit him as it seemed to me that possibly he would not be good with people, better with facts and numbers that add up or must add up. Rather often humanity does not. The above is only as the Cardinal struck me and evidential of nothing whatsoever except that - I think probably all practising CAtholics would have recognized Cardinal Pell without any difficulty whatsoever even as a much younger archbishop.
  11. cruciatacara

    End does not justify means

    Amen.
  12. cruciatacara

    Cardinal Pell's Appeal dismissed

    You are correct in that I said: "We all knew him and what he looked like. And how he behaved." Let me explain a little further what I meant. To go into any detail about his behaviour in both Ballarat and Melbourne would not be appropriate for this forum, especially as the charges that were initially laid against him for offences in Ballarat were eventually not brought to trial. But they were definitely well known by the public here. And those of us who interacted with him personally have stories to tell, but as I say, not appropriate here. The statement I made was actually intended merely to support my contention that it would be difficult for any Catholic who lives in the state of Victoria (and perhaps even all of Australia) to mistake Pell for any other priest, especially as he played significant roles in both Ballarat and Melbourne prior to becoming a cardinal. And at the time of the abuse at the Cathedral, he was the Archbishop... a very recognizable figure, certainly not unrecognizable to Catholics in Melbourne, especially those who attended Cathedral services. I was making my case in responding to the statement by Archbishop Comensoli that he believed the victim was abused but that he believed the victim was mistaken in who did it to him. This is simply not reasonable in my humble opinion. Perhaps Archbishop Comensoli is just trying to support Pell while also accepting the veracity of the victim. He is sitting on the fence because he doesn't know what to think, perhaps.
  13. Norseman82

    Laughter is good medicine.....

  14. Norseman82

    Laughter is good medicine.....

  15. BarbaraTherese

    End does not justify means

    It is tricky! I don't think that killing another can ever be a good, while it could be legitimate in motivation. One is not motivated to kill, rather to defend and protect. Were it to occur in self defence or in defence of another that I kill, I would be going to Confession first opportunity as a "just in case". Apparently too if a person is unsure of mortal sin or not, probably it was not mortal sin. I did read somewhere or other that the moral law and canon law is a minefield, which is why we have moral theologians and canon lawyers. I thought to myself, if that is true, then what hope do we have out here in the pews to understand. I do think that The Good Lord insights our inability perfectly. And yes, The Good Lord is Ultimate Mystery, Ineffable and Inscrutable.
  16. Lilllabettt

    Cardinal Pell's Appeal dismissed

    Pardon me. When you said "we all knew", I thought it was publicly known.
  17. cruciatacara

    End does not justify means

    Perhaps the end might actually justify the means in some occasions. For example, it is evil to kill someone, but if it were in defense of self or others then perhaps the end is good, even if the means are not. It is a tricky question. As for God, well, He is ineffable.
  18. cruciatacara

    Cardinal Pell's Appeal dismissed

    Ah the stories I could tell you! If only this were the proper forum for it, but it isn't. My knowledge of him is quite personal, but because of that, I will keep it personal. Thank you for your interest though.
  19. BarbaraTherese

    End does not justify means

    I do not think that the laws by which we are called to live are something imposed from above to keep us in line. Rather the laws by which we are called to live tell us something about God and His Nature and are revealed by God in order to draw us into Unity/Oneness with Him. This is why our laws are ideally embraced with love rather than a strictly moral need to obey the law, although that can be a beginning. A point from which I can grow. In other words, the end does not justify the means tells me something about God and the path to Unity and Oneness with Him in Love.
  20. BarbaraTherese

    End does not justify means

    Thank you for your input, Jane.
  21. Today's Gospel reading is the third of three parables in chapter 13 that deal with the theme of the unexpected reversals brought by the Kingdom of God. As this parable opens, Luke reminds us that Jesus is making his way to Jerusalem. He is teaching as he goes. A question from the crowd about will only a few be saved expresses the Jewish concern about whether everyone who calls himself a Jew is actually faithful to the covenant. This was a concern of the Pharisees. Their exclusive view had no place for the Gentiles, and their emphasis upon a strict observance of the prescriptions of the Law that was almost impossible for the common people, led them to conclude that the number of the saved would be rather small. Jesus answers that they must strive in the time remaining to enter through the narrow door because many will be trying to get in but won't be strong enough. The ‘narrow door’ of his parable does not imply that salvation is available to only a few; it refers to the conversion called for if his hearers are to accept his teaching, and thus become the people God wants them to be. Once all those entering the master's house are in and he locks the door, there will be no way for others to get in. Those left outside may knock, but the master will say he doesn't know them. The point of the parable of the ‘locked door’ is not exclusion, but the need to hurry in – the opportunity brought by Jesus is coming to an end. Only conversion from the constricted ways the nation has come to take for granted will give entrance to ‘the master’s house’ - knowing Jesus, even sitting at table with him, without heeding his call to become the people God intended them to be will leave them out in the cold. As Jesus also tells us in the Gospel of Matthew, “Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only the one who does the will of my Father in heaven.” (Matthew 7:21) People from the north, south, east, and west will take our place inside. Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and all the prophets will take our place in the Kingdom of God. Those who do not make it through the narrow door will be cast outside. The image of the door is replaced in the final verses of the parable with the image of the heavenly feast. Two passages from the Book of Isaiah influence the conclusion. Isaiah 43:5-6 speaks of God bringing Israel's descendants back from the east and from the west, the north and the south. And Isaiah 25:6 speaks of the Lord providing a feast of rich foods and choice wines for all peoples on his holy mountain. The answer to the question if only a few will be saved is no. In the end, many will be saved, but many who thought they would be saved will not be saved. The parable is a warning to repentance in order to enter the kingdom. A people who have not been faithful heirs to what they have received from ‘Abraham and Isaac and Jacob and all the prophets will find themselves ‘outside’. But God’s purposes will not be frustrated; the peoples of the world will ‘take their places at the feast in the kingdom of God’. Jesus was calling Israel back to a sharing in the generous ways of God that was their true faith tradition. But, as he makes his way to Jerusalem, time is running out. Do you know Jesus Christ as your personal Lord and Saviour? That question is often asked by evangelical preachers during their sermons. Those preachers challenge their listeners to consider if they truly know Jesus Christ in a personal way, or if their connection with Jesus is just a matter of being baptized and accepting certain facts about him. It is our actions rather than who we know that will save us. So, the more critical question is this: Does Jesus Christ know me as one of his disciples?
  22. little2add

    Would Donald Trump make a great Catholic!?

    Trump’s VP is catholic and really is pro-life. Joe Biden was VP and was pro-life, but now he’s not. think about that
  23. Yesterday
  24. BarbaraTherese

    2019 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    I am hoping so. Thank you for the article. Even if the increase is only slight, it is an increase and I am grateful for it. I hope and pray it will grow - even if it is only one little step at a time. I am surprised that there are not comprehensive statistics put out by the hierarchy. I did think there would have been with each diocese making reports to a central body.
  25. JHFamily

    2019 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    Unfortunately, 240 per year is rather pathetic, even if it is an uptick. That amounts to less than 5 per state. There are hotspots, however, that bring hope. I know one parish that has 4 young ladies in the same novitiate. My home parish has been getting one stable vocation (meaning that they haven't left the novitiate -- we've had more than that actually enter) for the last 4 years.
  26. AveMariaPurissima

    2019 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    You might be on to something there: https://www.globalsistersreport.org/news/trends/cara-survey-shows-uptick-number-men-women-taking-perpetual-vows-55834
  27. Lilllabettt

    Cardinal Pell's Appeal dismissed

    You knew how he behaved? How did he behave?
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