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  1. JHFamily

    JHFamily

    Chummy Commoner


    • Points

      28

    • Content Count

      236


  2. Nunsuch

    Nunsuch

    Chummy Commoner


    • Points

      25

    • Content Count

      740


  3. Luigi

    Luigi

    Church Militant


    • Points

      20

    • Content Count

      6,253


  4. Antigonos

    Antigonos

    Cordial Non-Catholic


    • Points

      19

    • Content Count

      780


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/15/2021 in all areas

  1. MIKolbe

    Prayers Please

    If I could please have your prayers as I continue discern a vocation to the permanent diaconate, it would be wonderful. This evening our class will be instituted as Lectors. Please pray for all the men (and their families) in our class. Thank you! - Jason
    7 points
  2. floscarmeli

    Canine conundrum

    Thank you all for all of your thoughtful replies! All of your different perspectives have shown me one thing at least—that I may not be quite ready to make this decision. I’m going to continue prayer, rest back, and trust Him. I’m sure I will know the answer in due time. Thanks again!
    7 points
  3. JHFamily

    Dietary restrictions in cloistered life?

    "Kathy" actually became my Dear Mother in my short stint with the Poor Clare Colettines. I was just thinking of her the other day, specifically, on the days when it was customary for the superior to serve everyone else (example, Thanksgiving Day), she would pile up my dish so high I would have a very hard time eating it all and had to actually stay late to do so. So this is particularly humorous for me!
    6 points
  4. Nunsuch

    Canine conundrum

    People leave behind, um, people when they enter religious life. Human beings. Family members. I'm sorry, but if you find the thought of leaving behind animals, no matter how important they are to you, a virtually insurmountable barrier, then it probably is a sign that you care more about them than about religious life. Nothing wrong with that. But part of religious life is detachment. As has been said, make sure they are well cared for. If your call is real, it will override this.
    5 points
  5. Luigi

    Staying at various benedictine monasteries

    JHFamily is correct - most monasteries have at least a few guest rooms; they all "receive guests as Christ." But making arrangements in advance is always preferred. When you contact a monastery to make arrangements, you might ask about: - the daily schedule - meals, Mass, hours of the divine office, - eating arrangements (with the nuns/monks, separate, self-catering), - whether/when you can pray with the sisters or monks, - whether they have a set stipend - any 'stay limit' such as three days - spiritual direction (confession, if it's a monastery of monks, or just discussion, Q
    5 points
  6. Luigi

    Gay Saints

    It is possible that some saints had homosexual inclinations, but: - Sharing a bed with a person of the same gender was standard operating procedure for centuries. Beds were scarce, and there was no central heating or electric blankets. Personally, I've had plenty of experience of "three heads in a bed," with cousins when they came to visit, and with little brothers and sisters who woke up scared in the night. I've heard the same argument attributed to Mark Twain when we was traveling in the American West, and because he wrote about boys skinny dipping in the river. People who make these
    5 points
  7. Ash Wednesday

    Rules For The Scrupulous Person

    I finally had time to watch and highly recommend it. Again one of the things I like about Fr. Ripperger is that he will elaborate on the "how and why" -- for example, I knew what absolution was, but up until watching that video, was not familiar with what direct vs. indirect absolution was, or what it means and why one would confess a forgotten mortal sin in submission to the power of the keys. I find this kind of information very helpful because I have a tendency to want to know the "how and why" -- likely because I'm a classic melancholic, detail oriented, prone to anxiety and scruples and o
    4 points
  8. Nihil Obstat

    Resources on Transgenderism

    Shocking.
    4 points
  9. Nunsuch

    Where does "semi-contemplative" communities comes from ?

    The term is a modern one, and. may well be cultural. I remember seeing it in the Lexau book, Convent Life (published in the 1960s), and I think also in the various McCarthy guides to women's religious communities. As Nada's post suggests, the term has no canonical or "official" standing. It was used to describe communities that tried to bridge the distinction between the purely contemplative and the apostolic by observing elements of each. A couple of examples are the Religious of the Sacred Heart, and the Daughters of St. Paul. "Monastic" is a different matter. It is often used incorrect
    4 points
  10. Dymphna

    Canine conundrum

    I want to second this, in both aspects. I once knew a religious community with two dogs, and I have to say, while the sisters all loved caring for them and taking them for walks, I got the impression the dogs were less happy with the arrangement. I believe dogs only cope well with so many "pack leaders", not with 20 sisters or so taking the role in turns. So, even if the convent would accept you as well as your dogs, it might be not in their best interest to expect them to become "convent dogs", shared with everyone. But I find the other point Nunsuch makes even more important, and I
    4 points
  11. Sponsa-Christi

    CoCL: Could a revert pursue a vocation to the Priesthood?

    Actual canon lawyer here, and I basically agree with what a number of people have already said: canonical apostasy is a very deliberate act of renouncing the Christian faith. This could be something like writing to the bishop or making a public statement rejecting Christianity; or it could be formal conversion to a non-Christian religion like Buddhism or Islam. Apostasy is *NOT* simply falling away from the faith; being a "bad Catholic"; skipping Mass; or even becoming Protestant. So, @Pooooma, based on what you've written it doesn't look like you're an apostate who needs a dispen
    4 points
  12. dUSt

    THANK YOU! Phorum updated thanks to you.

    I renewed the phorum's license and "spam protection service". Sorry--I let it lapse for a few weeks. The good news is I didn't have to beg for money this time. Phatmass' PayPal account is staying ahead of the phatmass bills thanks to 13 amesome phatmassers who are signed up for monthly gifts. THANK YOU!!!
    4 points
  13. truthfinder

    Shoes for the Convent

    Definitely do ask the superior/novice mistress before bringing any books to the monastery that you have not already been told to bring. If you do bring books, they will probably be regarded as gifts and you might not get them back if you leave. Make sure to ask.
    4 points
  14. MIKolbe

    Resources on Transgenderism

    I hope you return and I welcome it.
    3 points
  15. Nihil Obstat

    Rules For The Scrupulous Person

    I stop in on occasion.
    3 points
  16. gloriana35

    Canine conundrum

    I am not familiar with this monastery - but cloistered Carmelites are expected to be detached to a huge extent. (Not that all religious life does not involve detachment, but, in a house of active Franciscans, one might just find a pet - not that everyone can bring one along.) I wonder (and cannot know) if this is more a reason you are thinking of not to pursue such a life - very strict and austere - than what would prevent you for doing so. Converts, or those who come to devotion in mature years, often have a period of having a sense of needing to do the extraordinary. Focus on your Confi
    3 points
  17. Luigi

    Transgender Man Here! Ask Me Anything! :)

    A person may be excluded from receiving a sacrament for any of a number of reasons - lack of preparation, lack of disposition, age, gender, and so forth. If the church is aware that a person is genetically of Sex A (or B), it will withhold the sacrament of marriage to another person of Sex A (or B). The Church recognizes that the person of is Sex A, no matter what gender the person identifies as. The Church has the right and the duty to make these determinations since the sacraments were established by Jesus and handed down, as part of the deposit of faith, through the apostolic succession. Th
    3 points
  18. Credo in Deum

    Transgender Man Here! Ask Me Anything! :)

    Wow, 20 pages and no ones looked to one of the main things the Church posses which can settle this argument on transgenderism and that's the Sacraments. 1. Can the OP get married to a woman? 2. Can the OP receive Holy Orders? The answer is, no, which means the Church views the OP as female. Also, the Church is silent on this matter in the same way Christ was silent to Pilate. People who do not want to conform to the Truth cannot be helped.
    3 points
  19. JHFamily

    Benedictines of Mary ask for help...

    I don't know if you meant to be tongue-in-cheek. If you do, I apologize. I live in a very, very rural part of the country (I call it end-of-the-road, USA) where you can occasionally see a road sign that is very intentionally shot up. The occasional stray bullet in a sign is not all that common. Most of the time it is very intentional. I don't know if you read about the incidents, but this has happened not once but three times at night -- the monastery has four or five bullet holes that pierced through multiple walls, indicating it was at short range. Rifles can shoot for a long dist
    3 points
  20. Ash Wednesday

    Struggles with Depression

    I think people get down on medications for treating depression and anxiety because of the myth that they are supposed to be problem solvers, or that they are supposed to render things like behavior and spiritual practice irrelevant. I've had to take antidepressants off and on for a long time. The first time was because my thyroid crashed and it caused a hormone imbalance that sent me into a depression. Medication helped that a great deal. Recently I've found that the immunosuppressants I'm on also have contributed to some anxious side effects so I take medicine to help with this at the moment.
    3 points
  21. Antigonos

    Dietary restrictions in cloistered life?

    As sisters age, various dietary restrictions become inevitable in every community. I would suggest contacting any community you are seriously discerning with, and simply asking them if your particular problem is one they can deal with.
    3 points
  22. Totally Franciscan

    Dietary restrictions in cloistered life?

    Sorry, I don't know about the Benedictines of Mary regarding dietary restrictions, but just an FYI, I was in a Carmel and had hypoglycemia. I needed to have more protein and low carbs to keep my blood sugar level. This posed no problems in the community, and I could take or leave foods that were a problem for me. As a matter of fact, other sisters had problems, so a "diet kitchen" was set up to meet the needs of those sisters. I also know that the Poor Clares of Cleveland take care of sisters with dietary needs. Of course, it would depend on the community.
    3 points
  23. JHFamily

    CoCL: Could a revert pursue a vocation to the Priesthood?

    I'm pretty sure this is only applicable if you formally apostatized and renounced the Faith to the bishop himself.
    3 points
  24. profer_lumen_cæcis

    Anxiety and doubts about religious life?

    @StThereseMaria, so much wonderful advice has been posted to this thread! One thing I think might be worth adding: After you convert to Catholicism, if you persevere in discerning a vocation, remember that a lack of romantic feelings and a desire to remain single do not in and of themselves necessarily point to a religious vocation. Romanticism, desire for family life, and want for children all, in varying degrees, are important aspects of a religious vocation. To become a nun is to choose Our Lord as your spouse--that is the very reason why many traditional orders still have the beautifu
    3 points
  25. Nunsuch

    Anxiety and doubts about religious life?

    You are romanticizing what it is all about, including the "perfection" of those called. You also seem to think that most religious receive visions and other highly unusual holy signs. They don't--and many of those who think they do are living under forms of delusion. Religious life, like anything worthwhile, is HARD, even for those truly called to it. [They same could be said for marriage.] That doesn't mean, by the way, that it isn't also joyful. But it is true joy--not giddiness. How do you know if it is a true call? First, become a Catholic, and engage in serious spiritual practice for
    3 points
  26. truthfinder

    Anxiety and doubts about religious life?

    I want to mention here something that has not been picked up by any of the other commenters: her stated aromanticism. What you write comes across as if you have completely dismissed marriage, and are now asking what you do with your life. This sort of thinking of falling into religious life is problematic (same as if a man or woman said, I can't find a spouse, so I guess I must go to the monastery. Or vice versa, no monastery will take me, I will marry the next person who shows interest in me.) Look more into converting to Catholicism, get a steady habit of prayer, put religious life ou
    3 points
  27. Anastasia

    Anxiety and doubts about religious life?

    It is a dangerous way to think - "special" etc. Many people entered monasteries and a few became saints. On the other hand, much more people did not enter monasteries but some of them also became saints. God gives visions and revelations to whoever He wants, regardless they holiness. St Teresa of Avila (a great Carmelite mystic who had received superabundant consolations from Our Lord) insists that visions etc. are not at all necessary for sanctity. On the other hand, every Christian has a kind of a mystical experience if he does not close his heart to God. When the Holy Spirit infu
    3 points
  28. Nunsuch

    Where does "semi-contemplative" communities comes from ?

    I think you mean me (@Nunsuch). Anyway, while most of my research focuses on the period prior to the 1917 Code in the US, I have published a bit on the last century. Prior to 1900, there really was only one form of canonical religious life for women--the enclosed, cloistered kind--with everything else (by then by far encompassing most sisters) seen as "exceptional. In 1900, the papal document Conditae a Christo finally recognized active, uncloistered religious life for women as an official thing. The Normae to codify this were issued in 1901, and were incorporated into the 1917 Code of Canon L
    2 points
  29. truthfinder

    Where does "semi-contemplative" communities comes from ?

    I think this may be a shift from the older "semi-cloistered" which again would be close to 'monastic' in that the sisters' apostolate was on their own grounds but in which they interacted with the public.
    2 points
  30. eustace-scrubb2

    Hello, I have returned!!

    Lil' update for y'all... In 2012, I was confirmed into the Eastern Orthodox Church. Things eventually soured to the point where I was not okay with being a part of it, as I was one of the victims of a local scandal within it. And it was dealt with inappropriately, which disgusted me. There were other things that happened, too, which I don't need to get into. Anyhow, in addition to that, God had initially told me to convert to Catholicism around the time I started posting here, not Eastern Orthodoxy. And I agree with Catholic theology. But not so much with Eastern Orthodoxy. I knew
    2 points
  31. profer_lumen_cæcis

    Canine conundrum

    I don't know--it seems to me that a community might be leery of one who expresses a preference to being a dog or dogs.
    2 points
  32. Ice_nine

    Transgender Man Here! Ask Me Anything! :)

    I know this is a bit off topic, but as regards to the calls for censorship we've been getting: Someone once said in times of uncertainty and doubt people long for strongmen to lead them. I think we're seeing a strong push for authoritarianism among the more left-leaning segment of society, maybe the traditionalists want that as well? I think we're a lot more similar to our perceived enemies then we would like to admit. I'm a little disturbed by the rising tribalism I'm seeing, if I'm seeing things right. I think it would benefit us greatly to calm down and be rational. There are
    2 points
  33. fides' Jack

    Transgender Man Here! Ask Me Anything! :)

    I would just add one more thought... In a world where censorship is the rule of the day, and just about all true conservative ideas are banned in all the popular online applications, one would think that allowing a free exchange of ideas is the answer. I don't know. Maybe it is. But IF it is, then it falls on those who hold the true faith to speak it loudly, even at the risk of serious persecution. Because if we don't, it won't matter.
    2 points
  34. fides' Jack

    Transgender Man Here! Ask Me Anything! :)

    If the point of allowing this thread to continue in order that Church teaching may be shown forth naturally, it has failed. I warned in the beginning Catholics absolutely need to reject this false gender ideology, and most who have commented here haven't done so. In fact, one "theologian" more or less defended it. A few have condemned it. Too few. I still hold that Phatmass is under moral attack. And I'm sorry to say this, but if you don't recognize the intrinsic evil of transgenderism, your moral compass is broken and cannot be trusted in other matters, either. No, I will no
    2 points
  35. PaxCordisJesu

    Staying at various benedictine monasteries

    I don't know where you're planning on staying, but I do know that Clear Creek Abbey in Hulbert, OK and the Benedictines of Mary, Queen of Apostles in Gower, MO are both receiving guests. Never been to Gower, but Clear Creek has excellent accommodation for women, including meals served daily.
    2 points
  36. JHFamily

    Staying at various benedictine monasteries

    I think most of them have guest houses and would allow you to stay for a stipend amount. You would have to arrange for this beforehand so that they can make sure they have room available for you! I think you need to kind of plot out your travels and then begin contacting monasteries with concrete dates. The more advance notice you can give, the better.
    2 points
  37. JHFamily

    Family of Jacopa

    I think it is true that they are quite small. When they were in Oklahoma, the new bishop withdrew his support for this fledgling community and they were not able to accept new vocations. That has now changed. I am sure this is true. However, there are so few TLM communities to serve the growing vocations that I believe they may be the exception to the rule. This community is Benedictine, so while they are a new community, they are not trying to start a new order. In addition, just because most do not survive, I do not think that it follows that none should be tried.
    2 points
  38. Ash Wednesday

    Hello, I have returned!!

    Deo Gratias! Happy Easter, Alleluia!
    2 points
  39. Credo in Deum

    Transgender Man Here! Ask Me Anything! :)

    Here you're referring to individuals who are intersex. These cases are EXTREMELY rare and the biological abnormalities which classify someone as intersex doesn't even apply to the majority of people who identify as trans!
    2 points
  40. cappie

    EASTER SUNDAY OF THE RESSURRECTION OF THE LORD

    The women disciples were among the very few who stayed with Jesus until the end, waiting with him until he died. They knew he was dead, that it was no illusion. For them as well as for all his followers, Jesus’ crucifixion and death seemed at first a crushing, disillusioning end, without hope or redemption. For them, all was lost, all was dark. Despite the promises they wanted to cling to, it appeared that Jesus and his cause had been defeated. Despite this apparent reality, the women stayed with him throughout this tragedy. The women stayed with him even after his death. Despite their
    2 points
  41. cappie

    HOLY THURSDAY

    Whenever we celebrate Mass, we hear the institution of the Eucharist: Take. Bless. Break. Give. Forgive. Remember. These are the actions of the Eucharist, mentioned in the synoptic gospels and testified to by Paul in his letter to the Corinthians. Jesus takes up some basic things that are used every day, and in turn, gives us life and strength. The bread: he blesses, breaks it open, then he gives it to the people. Think about this: for the bread to be shared, it has to be broken. For Jesus to be shared, he has to be broken. He loves us; he is willing to be broken so he can share himself w
    2 points
  42. Bonkira

    Dietary restrictions in cloistered life?

    That's really a question you would have to pose to them as part of your discernment process. Lots of things can be worked around in a cloister (I had my dietary issues worked with easily) but that is part of the discernment process...so, as you acknowledge that you have idealized a lot of their life, don't put the cart before the horse
    2 points
  43. Bonkira

    Family of Jacopa

    Yes to all of what Nunsuch says. I have seen many, MANY communities (cloistered, uncloistered, semi-contemplative, fully active) take MANY older vocations. I honestly think it is the exception that a community doesn't take older vacations. Many of the orders that are popular now and/or focus on a particular interpretation of 'traditional' provide a picture that is not quite accurate of the vocational landscape. I've observed (thank you Zoom) 7 various clothing or vows ceremonies this year, and 5 of them were older and/or non-traditonal vocations. A local vocation-oriented person recently obser
    2 points
  44. JHFamily

    Reception of the host

    True, this is the norm in the United States. However, the norm for the Church universal is kneeling and on the tongue. The United States has a dispensation from this norm and priests are not allowed to refuse communion to those who wish to receive otherwise. (Not picking, just clarifying.)
    2 points
  45. profer_lumen_cæcis

    Dietary restrictions in cloistered life?

    +J.M.J.+ @Michelle_christi, Blessed Palm Sunday and welcome to phatmass! Unfortunately, because the Sisters are a monastic order they rely heavily on bread. I am not too sure about the dairy aspect, as I am sure they could substitute eggs instead of cheese, but I do know for a fact that a gluten allergy is challenging to them (I know a couple of the sisters very well). That being said, without giving too much information (I want to protect one of the sisters' privacy ) I know that certain food allergies/intolerances can be overlooked if it is determined that there is, in fact, a vocation.
    2 points
  46. Antigonos

    CoCL: Could a revert pursue a vocation to the Priesthood?

    Can a "decision" by a child be held to have any validity? By your own account, as an adult, you made a conscious decision to return to your faith.
    2 points
  47. PaxCordisJesu

    Convents in the UK with exclusively TLM?

    Welcome to Phatmass! I know this community doesn't have the Latin Mass, but they're worth looking at just the same. http://www.stceciliasabbey.org.uk They have the Latin Novus Ordo Form daily with Gregorian chant, and also sing the entire Divine Office in Latin (also with Gregorian chant). They are an incredible community, very traditional, and growing. They currently have 7 in formation out of the entire community of 31! Even if you don't want to discern with them, it wouldn't be a bad idea to at least check them out or go on retreat with them if you're anywhere close to
    2 points
  48. Antigonos

    Anxiety and doubts about religious life?

    As you investigate Catholicism, you will discover that there are many paths to religious life, not all involve entering a convent. Here on the forum, there are members in private vows but who live in secular life, Consecrated Virgins who don't appear obviously "religious" in daily life [but who are, intensely]. They are as devout as those in monastic life. Therefore, your first step is to become thoroughly informed about Catholicism, and THEN, after conversion, if that happens, begin to investigate the different aspects of living as a Catholic.
    2 points
  49. MIKolbe

    Gay Saints

    so people who struggle with sin can become saints? don't know about you, but that's good news for me!
    2 points

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