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  1. BarbaraTherese

    BarbaraTherese

    Chummy Commoner


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      58

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      8,714


  2. Lilllabettt

    Lilllabettt

    Church Militant


    • Points

      50

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      4,560


  3. little2add

    little2add

    Chummy Commoner


    • Points

      43

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      2,927


  4. beatitude

    beatitude

    Mediator of Meh


    • Points

      30

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/24/2019 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    Bonkira

    Questions to ask a Community

    There are good options here. Like Lillabett, I too spoke to folks who had left the order I entered with..several in fact..and one order i discerned with, and it's not really that uncommon anymore. I had very valuable conversations with them all, and appreciated very much that i was able to speak with them. I asked them about obedience and I had multiple conversations with multiple sisters about what that meant individually and community wide, and similarly for poverty and chastity as well because that informs me about the community and the community about me. Likewise, I also asked sisters to tell me who they thought was a good fit for the community, what might be a challenge, and asked about specific examples of what had/had not worked in the past. It's also worth asking about private devotions, if you have devotions you feel strongly about. Sometimes personal devotions are encouraged, sometimes not or not for novices. Orders want questions. All superiors and novice directors I talked to while I was discerning and after I discerned out of the order I entered were gleeful about folks asking questions because that is how they know us, too. Several superiors made comments that people who do not ask questions have a difficult time or have a skewed view of what the will of the almighty might actually be (we are created with curiosity and we should use it). Ask your questions as a discerner.
  2. 4 points
    Luigi

    Vocational Guilt

    An awful lot of women joined religious orders in the years before the Second Vatican Council. An awful lot of women left religious orders after the Second Vatican Council. One reason so many women (and men) left - and it's only one reason, it's not a comprehensive explanation - was that so many of them never should have joined in the first place. In those days, an awful lot of families put an awful lot of pressure on an awful lot of their children to become a priest or join a religious order. If God doesn't call the person to religious life or the priesthood, she or he shouldn't join.
  3. 3 points
    Fr. Antony Maria OSB

    Dominican or Benedictine

    I actually went to seminary at St. Meinrad, and they have quite a few monks who are not involved in the seminary at all, including some of the newer vocations. Br. Zachary Wilberding is their vocation director, and he'd be a good person to talk to about their balance between work and prayer. His information can be found here: St. Meinrad Vocations Additionally, some of their younger monks put out a podcast called "Echoes from the Bell Tower." Some of the episodes might be able to answer some of your questions. It can be found here: Echoes from the Bell Tower.
  4. 3 points
    Pax17

    A Day in the Life of a Postulant:

    From the Summit Dominicans: https://www.summitdominicans.org/blog
  5. 3 points
    beatitude

    Can we please all just take a breather before posting about political issues?

    One rule I try to follow, with varying degrees of (un)success, is, "Would I want to stand at the communion rail and say this right before Communion? Would I be happy to give Jesus this kind of welcome?" If the idea of saying it there makes me wince, then I realise I probably shouldn't be saying it anywhere.
  6. 3 points
    Anomaly

    Number of mass shootings in 2019 per country

    Sadly, the US won’t do anything effective. Again. Politicians are busy trying to score political points or defend against political hits. Extremists are arguing between no guns at all or no new restrictions at all. There will be no way a reasonable compromise of tightening restrictions, discussions on mental health, or discussion of cultural desensitizing of violence from media and games.
  7. 3 points
    beatitude

    What do you bring to the convent?!

    I have two close friends who are Dominican friars, who have lived in large quite priories in different European countries, and one of them was joking about the suffering undergone by the brother responsible for the laundry whenever anything in tomato sauce appears at meals. So I think in larger communities they're more likely to have one person who is assigned to do laundry, which would make sense - it's much simpler and more straightforward for one person to do the washing for twenty, than to have all twenty friars trying to find their own slot to use the washing machine. In a little house it's simpler for people to do their own.
  8. 2 points
    Luigi

    Article: "Why I Desire To Be a Catholic Priest"

    This is a concise article by a Dominican friar in formation. It's quite well written. ######################################################################################### The difficulty of explaining “why I desire to be a Catholic priest” is that there are ten thousand reasons all amounting to one, rather mysterious and all-encompassing reason: I have heard a still, small voice in the silence of my heart. And I believe it to be his voice. I could fill the remaining space of this reflection with other, no less important or inconsequential reasons as to why I desire to be a Catholic priest. As, for instance: (1) I desire to give my whole heart to God with complete freedom of soul, such that he becomes my only inheritance, my only possession; and it seems that I can do no better than to become a Catholic priest in order to fulfill this desire. (2) I desire friendship with Jesus, and the thought of caring for him in the Blessed Sacrament and for all that appertains to it—including its reservation, distribution, and adoration—produces a deep and abiding joy in my heart; and no other vocation allows for such intimacy with the Blessed Sacrament as that of a Catholic priest. (3) I desire to save souls, to give to each individual soul that which is most suitable for its salvation, and to give to all souls what is, in the end, everything: God; and the grandeur of this task is principally entrusted to Catholic priests. (4) I desire to be a Catholic priest, because I wish to be nothing without Jesus, and everything with him; and so on. Or I could fill the remaining space of this reflection with my so-called vocation story, but I happen to think that my vocation story is an absolute bore. Thousands of much better men have given their lives to the priesthood. And their stories are magnificent. I would much prefer to say here precisely that which can be said by any man who has sought ordination to the priesthood. In short, the desire to be a Catholic priest is born from love. But this love is not only greater than man, it is greater than anything in the world, and still greater than the world itself. This love of which I speak is the love of God. And the desire to be a Catholic priest is born from this love, from the very love of God. Why? For the sake of space, four reasons will suffice: (1) The desire to be a Catholic priest is born from the love of God because any semblance of desire for the priesthood (and what it entails) is inconceivable without knowledge of the love of the heart of Jesus. (2) The desire to be a Catholic priest is born from the love of God because only God can enlarge the capacity of the human heart to embrace souls with the gentle and chaste love of Jesus, the eternal high priest. (3) The desire to be a Catholic priest is born from the love of God because only God can so thoroughly conquer the heart of man with a voice as soft, delicate, and forgiving as his. (4) The desire to be a Catholic priest is born from the love of God because only God can fill the heart of man with himself, with his own adorable heart. The mysterious designs by which God communicates this desire to men is nothing short of astonishing. It reveals the exquisite tenderness and incredible patience of Jesus with the souls of priests, who so often drag their dignity through the mire and repay his love with deceit. And yet, God continues to call lowly men to Holy Orders; and I pray that he has called me. The difficulty of explaining “why I desire to be a Catholic priest” is that there are ten thousand reasons all amounting to one, rather mysterious and all-encompassing reason: I have heard a still, small voice in the silence of my heart. And this is no human voice. “Come, follow me.”
  9. 2 points
    asimina

    Gary David

    This is the most wholesome thread on Phatmass
  10. 2 points
    Jane_Doe2

    Evangelising On LDS Forum

    When you post things like I've never heard someone critical of LDS beliefs, or somebody pro-Catholic, it gives that impression. Respect is a big deal for me, along with getting my facts straight from primary high-quality sources (more on this in my reply to Seven77's comment). Female yes, middle aged. For me, a big deal is getting my facts straight and going to high quality primary sources. Hence my learning about Catholicism straight from Catholics. I attend Mass, chat with knowledgeable Catholics (layman and priests), read CCC, read high quality Catholic commentaries (like stuff written by Saints), etc. YouTube videos can be... some can be good, but there's a lot of trashy ones out there too. I don't need to watch a video about "____ faith exposed!" or something downright bashing. I'd rather something that's primary source, respectful, and factual. *Thinking of an example recent video I have watched*... when Notre Dome had that tragic fire, I did watch a video covering it and several videos on the history of the cathedral (videos put out by reputable Catholic sources and caretakers of the cathedral). And yes, continuing to learn is a GREAT thing! Learn about God, learn about ourselves, learn about our fellow man, and so many other things.
  11. 2 points
    Kayte Postle

    Update On Nonnovi!

    @NonNovi It's really great to hear from you and hear what the Lord is doing in your life. I'll be praying for you as you transition back into lay life. You phamily is here to support you!
  12. 2 points
    little2add

    Number of mass shootings in 2019 per country

    F- bomb, really. Please be a little more civil with your words thank you Wow
  13. 2 points
    little2add

    Laughter is good medicine.....

  14. 2 points
    Lilllabettt

    What do you bring to the convent?!

    I must say. I seriously enjoyed not having to do my own laundry or my own cooking. Seriously seriously glad I didnt have to wash everyone's hankies. It was a perk although sometimes a sacrifice (we ate what was prepared, the end.) We also had the "threat" of inspections that never took place. It wasnt "my" cell, "my" desk, "my" closet. It was ours, and the lack of expectation of privacy was part of living poverty.
  15. 1 point
    cruciatacara

    End does not justify means

    Amen.
  16. 1 point
    little2add

    Drop a word, keep a word

    Right wing
  17. 1 point
    dUSt

    My abortion debate in the YouTube comments section

    dUSt: So are you willing to have a critical thinking discussion with someone who is pro-life? If so, I'm game. We can leave emotion, politics, and religion completely out of it. I'm curious to know when you think a human being actually becomes a human being, and when that human being should have the same rights as any other human being. I can tell you with 100% confidence that science does not teach us human life begins when it leaves the uterus. Andrew: Well why should a fetus have more rights than an already birthered human? dUSt: @Andrew Scientifically, a fetus is a human being. If you do not think a fetus is a human being, I'd like to hear your reasons of why you think that way. So, if we establish that we are dealing with a human life, all human life should have equal rights, should it not? If not, who should determine which humans have more rights than others? Should mentally challenged people have less rights? Should older people have more rights than younger people? Rich people more rights than poor? I guess my question back to you would be, why should some humans have more rights than others? Andrew: @dUSt: There is no hard scientific classification tho for when an individual "becomes" a human. Only what designates the species "homosapian". Don't start playing word games or i can easily take this into a "every sperm is sacred" argument just as easily. So, if we establish that we are dealing with a human life, all human life should have equal rights, should it not? Except you seem give more rights to a fetus than you do other humans. I guess my question back to you would be, why should some humans have more rights than others I do not, this is a question for you. I believe humans have the right to bodily autonomy. You however seem to think that a fetus should have rights over another human's body. For example, i can not force you to give me your kidney. I can not even force my mother or father to give me their kidney. Or blood, or liver donation... whatever. I have no right to use another human's body to sustain my own life. However you are giving that right to a fetus. YOU are the one giving more rights to a fetus than to other humans. Unless you do think i should be able to force another human to sustain me. dUSt: Andrew, I do think in certain situations, where human (A) is depending on another human (B) to live, that human (B) should have a lawful obligation to keep human (A) alive. If we disagree on this point, then we simply place different values on human life, and we can go our separate ways, agreeing to disagree. You have yet to answer my original question though. When do you believe a fetus turns into a human being that should be afforded the same rights as other human beings? Based on your bodily autonomy argument, I'm only left to assume that you believe abortion should be legal up until the second before birth, since the human life before that point is dependent on the body of the mother. Andrew: @dUSt: Well there you go, you are rejecting the idea of bodily autonomy and saying a fetus has access to rights other humans can not have. So please stop saying you think all humans should have the same rights when you clearly want special protections for a fetus, but deny those protections to other humans. You have proved my point that you, and many like you, think the unborn should be given rights you would deny to other humans. dUSt: @Andrew Gentle reminder, you still have not answered my question about when you think a human should begin to have rights. Also, I do not think a fetus should have any access to rights that any human wouldn't have. There is a difference between giving up a kidney, and being pregnant. Although being pregnant can be a great hardship to women, it is how nature intended things to work. Cutting out someone's kidney to put it in another person is not exactly working in cooperation with nature. It's not really a fair comparison. Here's a better one: A pregnant woman runs out of gas in the middle of nowhere. She has the baby. The baby dies unless the woman breast feeds. I think the woman should have a lawful obligation to violate her bodily autonomy and feed the baby. You don't? It's actually really hard to have this discussion with you until you answer my leading question, because you haven't even defined when you think a human should begin to have rights. Andrew: @dUSt: Youtube's fault. Sometimes the "show more" doesn't actually show up. But i think its completely reasonable to grant a human it's rights when it no longer becomes dependent on the anatomy of another human. Not that hard to get your head around. At that point the bodily functions of that fetus are able to operate independently for themselves. It is no longer an extension of the mother, but rather it's own person. This puts them on par with other humans without having to make special exceptions for them that grants them rights other humans are denied. Also, I do not think a fetus should have any access to rights that any human wouldn't have Except you keep arguing that it should... There is a difference between giving up a kidney, and being pregnant Not really... a fetus must rely on the body of another human to live. Without using that body it would never be able to function and survive on it's own. Without my kidney i would also not be able to survive. I would die. What you are saying is that that fetus has the right to use another human's body even if that other human wants to deny them that right. However i can not use another human's body to also live if that other human denies me that right. For me to have access to another human's body to live i must get consent from that human. Even in cases were i would certainly die if i did not get the blood or tissue donation. Even if it is my own mother i need the kidney from, she can deny it to me, as is her right. I do not have the right to use my mother's body to sustain my own. However you keep arguing that a fetus can. Meaning that right stops at birth, meaning you are arguing for more rights for a fetus than for anyone else. it is how nature intended things to work The intentions of nature are moot here. Nature for example intends for people with cancer to die. Nature would intend for a vast quantity of newborns to die soon after birth. However we have found ways to subvert nature. Also if we are talking about nature you could make the argument for survival, and for some women having a child can mean they quite literally would not survive. Either way arguing the "intentions" of nature is a non argument, especially when nature actually has no intentions or goals. Only processes. Giving nature "intentions" is us personifying it. Gravity does not "intend" for objects to fall, its just how those processes are interpreted by us. A pregnant woman runs out of gas in the middle of nowhere. She has the baby. The baby dies unless the woman breast feeds. I think the woman should have a lawful obligation to violate her bodily autonomy and feed the baby. You don't You really seem to have trouble grasping what the argument is. See once the baby reaches a point of it being able to survive on it's own, we do not actually mean it has to go out and get a job and start buying it's own milk. It means that biologically it is not dependent on another human. Of course it will rely on people while helpless, but it can be fed by anyone. This is no different than you refusing to feed your dog. We do not say the dog is violating your bodily autonomy if you refuse to feed it. However if the mother does not wish to take on the responsibility of feeding the baby there is a legal requirement for them to pass that responsibility on to someone else. You cant do that when pregnant. You cant pass your pregnancy on to someone else. In the case of refusing to feed a newborn this is neglect of another human because that baby is now a human, with human rights. And it is illegal for anyone to purposefully neglect another human. Now... if that newborn baby needed a tissue donation and only the mother had a match we DO NOT force the mother to donate to that baby and WOULD NOT charge her with a crime. Because as a human that baby does not have anymore right to that than i do to demand an organ donation from you. dUSt: @Andrew "...its completely reasonable to grant a human it's rights when it no longer becomes dependent on the anatomy of another human." ... So, when a person becomes dependent on an anatomy of another human, that person should no longer have rights. Got it. Disagree completely, but now I better understand your stance. The humanity of that first person does not factor into you granting that person rights. Whether or not that person depends on someone else is how you think that their human rights should be determined. dUSt: @Andrew "..you keep arguing that a fetus can. Meaning that right stops at birth, meaning you are arguing for more rights for a fetus than for anyone else." ... No, I'm not arguing that right stops at birth. Parents are lawfully required to keep their children alive after birth, and I agree with these laws. Anyway, I'm also not opposed to the more vulnerable having more rights. For example: People who can't afford healthcare should have a fundamental right to it. A person confined to a wheelchair should have a right to have a ramp into a business, but it should not be a right for someone who does not require a ramp. dUSt: @Andrew "In the case of refusing to feed a newborn this is neglect of another human because that baby is now a human, with human rights." ... So, you said earlier you think its reasonable to grant a human it's rights when it no longer becomes dependent on the anatomy of another human. A baby born in the middle of nowhere, without any other options, would be 100% dependent on the anatomy of it's mother to provide milk--so therefore, in your view, not be granted human rights yet. Your stance is that the mother should not be lawfully obligated to provide that milk. It's just not a stance I'm down with, and a stance I can't fathom 1/2 the country supporting. dUSt: @Andrew "Nature would intend for a vast quantity of newborns to die soon after birth. However we have found ways to subvert nature." ... I don't understand your point here. We were discussing when a person should be required to violate their bodily autonomy in order to save another person from dying. You tried making a point about forcing people to donate kidneys. 1. There is a difference between preventing a life from ending and actively performing a medical procedure to end a life. The kidney thing is a bad comparison. 2. The person with the kidney likely had no responsibility over the life of the person who needed one. A mother (along with the father, except in cases of rape) would have some culpability in that life being created in the first place. 3. Here is where nature comes in. The uterus does not serve the mother. The only function of that uterus is to provide a place for a human being to grow. A human being with completely separate DNA mind you. It's not "part" of the mother's body. It's "inside" the mother's body. Andrew: @dUSt: No, I'm not arguing that right stops at birth. Parents are lawfully required to keep their children alive after birth, and I agree with these laws But not to the point where they must give up the right to their body for their child. Or do you think that if a baby needs a tissue/blood donation after birth the mother is legally required to donate said tissue or blood? Because they are not. Like... at all. Anyway, I'm also not opposed to the more vulnerable having more rights So back tracking on your earlier claim that you are not giving anyone more rights... People who can't afford healthcare should have a fundamental right to it. A person confined to a wheelchair should have a right to have a ramp into a business This is not granting unequal rights to people, this is making things equal. A fully able person can enter a building, putting in a ramp only makes sure that that disabled person can now enjoy what the abled person can as well. Giving free healthcare to a poor person allows them equal access to healthcare that the rich person can also have. However what you are saying is that i CANT have equal rights as a fetus. You are creating inequality, not equality. Your analogies you tried to give would only make sense if we only allowed the poor to have healthcare, or access to MRI's or something and refused that right to rich people. So, you said earlier you think its reasonable to grant a human it's rights when it no longer becomes dependent on the anatomy of another human. A baby born in the middle of nowhere, without any other options, would be 100% dependent on the anatomy of it's mother to provide milk--so therefore, in your view, not be granted human rights yet It would have the same rights as any other human in that position. Now im not sure the legality of if a lactating woman would be required to feed another human in that situation or not, but that would be the same thing. But on top of that a parent does take on extra legal responsibility for their own child, unless they give up that right. Having the child does put that extra responsibility onto the mother since she did not legally give signal to give that up. And that is what an abortion is, a legal signal that you are rejecting the responsibilities of a parent. Same with adoption. When you give a child up you are legally signalling that you are rejecting your responsibilities to care for that child. Intent is important. This is why for example you are legally required to care for your own children, but not responsible for feeding your neighbors kids. By signalling you are a parent to that child you now are more responsible. dUSt: @Andrew " do you think that if a baby needs a tissue/blood donation after birth the mother is legally required to donate said tissue or blood?" ... No, of course not. A person shouldn't be legally required to give up a part of their body in order to keep another human alive. I'm confused about your point though because at no time during pregnancy does a woman give up a "part of her body". I'm no doctor, but doesn't a women's body stay 100% intact? There's also a fundamental difference between taking no action to keep a human alive, and taking action to end a human life. I don't think you are making this distinction in any of your arguments. dUSt: @Andrew "Your analogies you tried to give would only make sense if we only allowed the poor to have healthcare, or access to MRI's or something and refused that right to rich people." ... That's actually exactly what I'm saying. Rich people with health insurance that cover MRIs should not have a right to free MRIs. Bill Gates should not have a right to eat free meals at a food bank, but someone without an income raising children should. I think we are going off topic though. I'd like to keep this focused on the most basic right anybody could have, which is the basic right to live. dUSt: @Andrew " And that is what an abortion is, a legal signal that you are rejecting the responsibilities of a parent. Same with adoption." ... Well, except that in all other cases you are not violating another human being's basic right to live, where as with abortion, you are denying another human being that basic right. Let me ask you this. You said earlier that a human being should have rights beginning when they are able to survive without the mother's body. As technology progresses, that time is getting shorter and shorter (22 weeks I think). So, for the sake of argument, and agreeing on SOMETHING, would you say you are then opposed to abortion after the third trimester? Kylie Hill: @dUSt: Okay fine let's assume that a fetus is 100% as much of a human being as you or me. That still doesnt make forcing someone to stay pregnant okay. All people have the right to bodily autonomy and someone else's right to life doesn't outweigh that. If it did then there'd be nothing wrong with things like forced organ transplants. After all wouldn't someone else's right to life outweigh your own right to decide whether or not to give them your organs? dUSt: @Kylie Hill "wouldn't someone else's right to life outweigh your own right to decide whether or not to give them your organs?" ... I don't think anyone should be forced to give up their organs, so I will not argue with this point, because I agree with you on that! Of course, we both know that a woman is not being forced to give up one of her organs by remaining pregnant. Andrew: @Kylie Hill The guy does not understand what bodily autonomy is nor why forcing a human to give an organ to another is analogies to forcing a women to carry a fetus. dUSt: @Andrew You're right. I don't understand why giving up an organ is a good analogy for remaining pregnant. Giving up an organ is a completely unnatural intervention. Remaining pregnant is a completely natural process. In reality, the better and more accurate analogy of giving up an organ is actually having an abortion. Nicc: @dUSt: so if someone was dying and needed your kidneys, its alright to force you/legally compel you to undergo surgery to give up your kidneys right? i mean, that persons life outweighs your temporary bodily autonomy.. thats your logic. it fall apart very quickly. im flabbergasted that people actually buy into your pseudo moralistic stances dUSt: @nicc No, it's not okay to force someone to give up their kidney's, lungs, or any other body part. That is completely unnatural. We are both smart enough to understand that when a woman is pregnant she is not giving up any organs to remain pregnant. I've heard this argument repeated hundreds of times but cannot understand the analogy at all.
  18. 1 point
    BarbaraTherese

    Prayer for Hong Kong

    Catholic Catechism (CCC) http://www.vatican.va/archive/ccc_css/archive/catechism/p1s2c2a7.htm The Church's Ultimate Trial 677 The Church will enter the glory of the kingdom only through this final Passover, when she will follow her Lord in his death and Resurrection.579 The kingdom will be fulfilled, then, not by a historic triumph of the Church through a progressive ascendancy, but only by God's victory over the final unleashing of evil, which will cause his Bride to come down from heaven.580 God's triumph over the revolt of evil will take the form of the Last Judgment after the final cosmic upheaval of this passing world.581 Just as The Church must enter into the Death of Jesus leading to His Resurrection, this is how I think of life here on earth. We too must enter into the Death of Jesus through suffering, great or small, which will lead to our own Resurrection and Heaven. Our symbol which goes before us, and ideally within us, is The Cross. I think life in Jesus is the greatest adventure a human being can embrace and live out. There is no greater adventure. Suffering in life, be it great or small, cannot be avoided and that goes for every human being. Striving to eliminate suffering is futile - it is intrinsic to the human condition and the whole of humanity. It is Catholic theology and spirituality, which rather than revealing a way to avoid suffering, speaks of Jesus, TheWay, The Truth and The Life, making suffering meaningful for the world, for The Church and for oneself and every human being. It is a great mystery but one cup of coffee without sugar could do more good in this world, for self and for all, than fasting all day every day. Mystery and Paradox. I think there is a stage in living in and with Jesus, in our spirituality, when personal suffering united to Jesus and His Cross can become no longer a cause for sadness or a level of depression i.e. the opposite of happiness, rather it can become an honor and a great privilege even though the suffering remains suffering and His Cross. God is The Final Victory, He will be victorious, as we are united to Him. God never permits what is too much to bear united to Him.
  19. 1 point
    reminiscere

    Seraphic Adorers of the Child Jesus

    Evidently a PCPA spin-off, from the members and the habit. https://www.facebook.com/seraphicsisters
  20. 1 point
    NadaTeTurbe

    Seraphic Adorers of the Child Jesus

    That's quite a name !
  21. 1 point
    Lilllabettt

    Feast Of The Assumption

    Did you know... the Assumption is in the Quran? That's proof of how ancient this teaching is.
  22. 1 point
    Not A Mallard

    The Last Person To Post In THIS Thread Is The Winner -Revisited

    Forgot about this thr3ad
  23. 1 point
    Didacus

    Quotations that Motivate & Inspire

  24. 1 point
    Didacus

    Just one-third of U.S. Catholics agree that Eucharist is body, blood of Christ

    You can count me in that 1/3. Our Lord walks with us, always. Even when we do not know He is there.
  25. 1 point
    BarbaraTherese

    Gary David

    You might like to make a note of the following contact points for dUSt in case you have problems again: Twitter http://www.twitter.com/phatmass Facebook http://www.facebook.com/phatmass Gary, if you explain to @dUSt via thread or PM what happened when you could not login- he might be able to do a tweak or two, which will mean you will not have problems in the future. Other than that, Gary - Yep! Knock and the door will open..........is another way of saying don't give up because we are not told how long to keep knocking The same goes for "ask and you will receive, seek and you will find". Finally, are you aware that we only get so many props every day, although I cannot recall how many. Once you have used your quota for the day, you cannot prop any more for that day. Once I realised that, I kept my props to posts I thought really good. I used to keep going to the top or near it on the "Prop Worthy" count. Then suddenly I dropped out...........and realised it was because Gary wasn't around any more. Personally, I do not deserve a prop or props for quotations into the thread "Quotations that motivate and inspire". These quotes simply land in my Inbox and I post them into the thread. ....60 seconds if that at the keyboard. But I very much thank you for your Props and am really hoping you will not be offended in any way, because I really love being either top or near it on the Prop Worthy Count. _______ "Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will find;knock and the door will be opened to you. For everyone who asks receives; he who seeks finds; and to him who knocks, the door will be opened.…" (Matthew Ch 7)
  26. 1 point
    Gary david

    Quotations that Motivate & Inspire

    Haaahaa. I'm laughing because it beats crying. Not much to do about us getting old Barbara, not much at all except for excepting it. I guess there are so many that didnt make it as far as did in life, they have long ago left thus earth. Maybe we did something wrong in a past life Barbara and the punishment is staying here haaahaa. No i consider it a blessing to be here to help as many as possible before we are called home. Talk to later Barbara ok. God bless you...gary
  27. 1 point
    BarbaraTherese

    Quotations that Motivate & Inspire

    I am cruising along through the ups and downs like the rest of us, Gary. Thank you for asking. Both Buddie and Missie (my cat) have been to the vet and Buddie goes again today for his arthritis shot. They are ok, just getting old like me when things can start to break down somewhat. Cheers and God bless.........Barb
  28. 1 point
    BarbaraTherese

    Quotations that Motivate & Inspire

  29. 1 point
    Lilllabettt

    Patron Saint Question

    The Orthodox and Catholic Churches had all the saints in common prior to the schism. I think Esther counts. The Vatican newspaper says she is celebrated July 1st: http://www.osservatoreromano.va/en/news/marrano-saint
  30. 1 point
    BarbaraTherese

    Quotations that Motivate & Inspire

    Happy Feast Day to all members of the Franciscan Order. St Clare, pray for The Church Militant on earth that we be blest and gifted to be makers of peace.
  31. 1 point
    BarbaraTherese

    A Day in the Life of a Postulant:

    Poll or not I am hoping you will stay around, Nunsuch.
  32. 1 point
    Peace

    The Webs Connecting 'Tradionalist' Catholics And White Nationlists

    Well the thread is about white nationalism and Catholics. Should it really be that odd that race is part of the thread? How is Affirmative Action racist? I am not sure if you know what it is and who it benefits. As for why we can’t stop making things about race, the reasons are deeply historical I think. Ideas of racial superiority and inferiority have been part of our country’s makeup since the very beginning and we obviously have a very sad and troubled history when it comes to race relations. I don’t think it’s realistic to put on blinders and pretend that race does not still play a large role in our everyday interactions. Just from the perspective of s black American, I’m not sure if you really understand the amount of disrespect that we still face day in and day out from larger society. I think that we have made great progress even from the time when I was a kid, and that wealth is more of a factor than race nowadays. And I do think that the media blows certain things out of proportion and injects race where it need not be injected, but at the same time we still have plenty to work out in terms of racial issues. Anytime you have people who want to have progress there are people who want to silence them and cause them to leave things the way they are without complaining. That was certainly the case with MLK and the early civil rights activists, where people wanted to silence as well. This is Phatmass my friend.
  33. 1 point
    MIKolbe

    The Webs Connecting 'Tradionalist' Catholics And White Nationlists

    (i think african-americans are people)
  34. 1 point
    little2add

    Can we please all just take a breather before posting about political issues?

  35. 1 point
    Josh

    Number of mass shootings in 2019 per country

    She's just keeping it 100. I respect it. I'm very capable of losing it. There's a lot of people with kids blood on their hands. Not to mention all the innocent adults blood.
  36. 1 point
    MIKolbe

    The Webs Connecting 'Tradionalist' Catholics And White Nationlists

    forward me you social security number and banking information and we can make this work.
  37. 1 point
    little2add

    Number of mass shootings in 2019 per country

    Opioid overdose and suicide statistically is way up in the United States far more deaths occur than deaths from mass shootings. The problem is largely ignored and is a greater evil by far
  38. 1 point
    LoveZoe11

    Little Ways to Foster a culture of Life.

    Hi Pham. Something came on my heart this afternoon during vigil Mass: What are some little ways that I can foster a reverence for the sacredness of human life on a day to day basis. Of course there are the usual ways such as pray outside an abortion facility, volunteering time and possily money to your local prolife pregnancy center, which are both super important and valuable. However, I wonder about other things we can do when we don't have time for the big stuff. I think something as simple as a smile to a stranger or letting someone know they look nice today. Little things to make people feel loved and appreciated. Also what are some opportunities to witness and evangelize that we can take? Thoughts? God Love You, Zoe
  39. 1 point
    little2add

    Can we vote for ANY of these people!?

    Last nights debate with all the radical far left political views practically guarantees a second term for Trump
  40. 1 point
    Lilllabettt

    What do you bring to the convent?!

    Well, we didnt do our own laundry. The laundry sister did. Presumably if she found herself folding a lacey thong and micro bra set she would notice.
  41. 1 point
    dUSt

    Opening of new Christ Cathedral (formerly Crystal Cathedral)

    THAT would be truly epic.
  42. 1 point
    BarbaraTherese

    Quotations that Motivate & Inspire

    Apologies - I inadvertently posted the previous video twice. THE DANGER OF TOYING WITH RELIGION
  43. 1 point
    dominicansoul

    Opening of new Christ Cathedral (formerly Crystal Cathedral)

    It would be cool if they had the money to convert every window into stain glass...depicting the life of Christ, and really the entire story of Salvation seeing that they have enough windows to do so...
  44. 1 point
    little2add

    Quotations that Motivate & Inspire

    Mine too
  45. 1 point
    dUSt

    Stranger Things

    Season 1 Steve and Season 3 Steve are so different. Lol. This can be illustrated no better than him wearing the ridiculous sailor outfit the entire season. Haha. Him and the girl after getting drugged by the Russians was a highlight of the whole season for me.
  46. 1 point
    Lilllabettt

    Trump Is KKK

    The technical definition of racism excludes people who do not hold the racial power in society. It's a word to describe a systemic dynamic. By this definition, black people cant be racist - in our society. Only white people can. I dont find this definition exactly useful. But, what you're describing is more technically described as prejudice, which yes, all people have. We all have prejudices and are prejudiced. But only white people can be racist. By the technical definition.
  47. 1 point
    cappie

    SEVENTEENTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

    In today's Gospel reading, from the beginning of Chapter 11 Luke presents the core of Jesus' teaching on prayer. The disciples notice Jesus praying “in a certain place.” They ask him to teach them to pray just as John the Baptist had taught his disciples. Jesus teaches them a simple version of the most famous Christian prayer, the Our Father, or the Lord's Prayer. Having taught his disciples a simple, daily prayer, Jesus goes on to reassure them that God answers prayers. First, he tells a parable about a persistent neighbour who asks a friend for bread at midnight, because the neighbour is persistent, the sleeping man gets up and gives him all that he needs. This teaching concludes with the reminder that if we seek, we will get a response. The parable and the concluding teaching in this section Jesus teaches prayer consists in recognizing God's holiness and his rule over all things. So, why do we pray? How does Jesus want us to pray? How can Jesus promise us that God will hear and respond to our prayers—that we will receive what we ask for, that doors once locked shut will be opened? When Martin Luther King, Jr., was living and working in Montgomery, Alabama, he came home late one night, and the phone rang. He picked up and, on the line, there was a man threatening to kill King and his family if he didn’t stop leading in the struggle for civil rights. He couldn’t get back to sleep. So, he went into the kitchen to make a cup of coffee and he began to pray. He describes this moment as a moment of reckoning with his faith. He had never questioned before; he had never doubted. In this moment, he knew that he would either need to put his trust in God wholeheartedly, or he would be consumed by fear and despair. He prayed all night and eventually the spirit of God overwhelmed him, and he was filled with deep peace and conviction. Days later, his house was bombed. If we can think of an example of someone for whom prayer informed his living, Martin Luther King is certainly among the most powerful. For him, prayer was not just a private practice of piety, it was the fuel and reassurance that inspired remarkable action in the world. It was the energy and life-force behind a movement of social change. This is the kind of prayer that Jesus was talking about, prayer is not meant to stay just between us and God. Our prayers need to have feet and hands. Prayer is the practice of seeking God’s presence and guidance as we work toward creating a better world. Prayer is one way we know God is with us, even when the challenges ahead seem insurmountable. Martin Luther King, Jr., faced the threat of bombing and death, but his connection to God through prayer gave him the courage to persist. His persistence ended segregation. Doors that had been sealed shut began to crack open. Questions that had gone unheard began to be answered. Needs that had neglected began to be met. What is happening in our world today that requires our persistence in prayer? The persistence of our prayer, the raising of our minds and souls to God, reinforced our own commitment to each other and the world around us. Forgiveness and reconciliation, thanksgiving and praise, hopes and desires blend into continued and continuing prayer. As St. Paul VI said, “To live, it is necessary to pray.” In prayer we can bargain with God as Abraham did in our First Reading, knowing our creator is mercy-filled. Through prayer we can recognize, as St. Paul did, that God is open to receive us whoever or wherever we are. In the familiar words of Luke’s Gospel, Jesus tells us that our Father gives “the Holy Spirit to those who ask him!” And if we have moments when we feel like our prayers are weak, or like we don’t know what to say or do, we can be like the disciples: “Lord, teach us to pray,” they asked him. Jesus stands ready not only to answer our prayers, but also to show us the way.
  48. 1 point
    Lilllabettt

    Embryo Adoption

    Thank you for this. I'm reading point and counterpoints to some of this and am making up my mind. I appreciate the feeding. Please no with the "ask your priest" advice. Lay people have to take responsibility for forming their own conscience and doing their own ethical decision making (where the Church has left grey areas). God wont be fooled if we stand before him and try to blame the priest. Not in this day and age. For laughs, I did ask my pastor... he was enthusiastic and followed it up with "and if you cant carry, you could get a surrogate!" For anyone reading: surrogacy is in direct opposition to an explicit teaching of the magisterium. People who live their lives doing what they want because they can tell God sorry later - have to live, after the fact, with the chance that their contrition is contaminated and might never be real enough to count. God is not fooled by such games.
  49. 0 points
    gloriana35

    What do you bring to the convent?!

    Sisters I knew, who entered in the 1950s (same community) were only allowed two pair of knickers (they had to give the superior the keys to their trunks after removing these), which they had to hand wash. In my 'free' day (forty years ago), there were customs (always connected to 'poverty' or 'obedience') which I would imagine the young would find incredible or laughable. (If one were told to make a pot of coffee for a guest, and no open coffee can was on the shelf, one had to return to ask permission to open a can!) The convent did have a washing machine, but it was so overloaded that I imagine there was a guardian angel of convent washers, since I never recall the motor burning out. Nothing was very clean, since it was so stuffed,and items were very wet after the cycle, but the dryer could be used only in a storm - it could be very cold and drizzling, but clothes had to be hung outdoors to avoid violations of poverty. I'm sure the young will find this incredible, but I'll tell you of one of my dreadful (unknowing) violations of poverty and obedience. Sisters normally could not use the washing machine (unless it was one's turn to do the communal laundry), but occasionally could receive special permission to do so. One of the Sisters was the sort who always was cold - even wearing the massive, serge habit, she wore old cardigans, old towels and blankets she'd cut up and pinned together to form another layer, and the like. She'd received permission to wash them. This Sister had arthritis in her arms and shoulders. (It was a top loader, and one had to load the machine, then press a button at its back to start the mechanism.) I was ironing in the laundry room, and noticed that she could not manage to lift her arm sufficiently to press the button, so I did it for her. I was in trouble for 'using' a washing machine without permission.
  50. 0 points
    cappie

    Rochester Cathedral and mini golf

    https://nationalpost.com/news/world/cathedral-in-england-opens-indoor-mini-putt-course-catholics-tee-off-on-the-idea “St John Fisher, Bishop of Rochester, went to his death rather than watch his cathedral fall into the hands of greedy iconoclasts. I suspect he would rather see it lie in ruins than experience this fate.”

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