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    Lilllabettt

    Church Militant


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    ToJesusMyHeart

    Chummy Commoner


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    Peace

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    Luigi

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/12/2019 in all areas

  1. 8 points
    clareagnes

    Entering a Poor Clare Colettine monastery

    I haven't been very active on this forum, but I did want to share joyful news that I am entering Corpus Christi Monastery of the Poor Clares in Rockford, IL, this Thursday, Nov. 21! I'm overwhelmed with a lot of emotions, mostly gratitude and excitement, and a little nervousness, too. My first sense of calling to religious life - as a Protestant - was more than a decade ago, and after a lot of meandering, wrong turns, and an abundance of grace God has led me first to become Catholic and now to this next step. Thanks be to God! I discerned with the community I'm joining for about a year and was first drawn to them after reading an oral history of the monastery called Dedicated to God, which I highly recommend. There is also a documentary about them called “Chosen: Custody of the Eyes," which I've heard is excellent (www.chosenthefilm.com). There are 20 professed nuns with 3 in the Novitiate, and I'm excited to be joining them! There has been a lot of joy and laughter in the parlor visits I've made with Mother Abbess and the Novice Mistress, and a deep, abiding peace in my heart as I prepare to enter. Although I haven’t commented frequently here, I have been grateful to learn so much here from all of you - about discernment, growing in relationship with our Lord, and hearing about new congregations. Please keep me in prayer on Nov. 21 and I will pray for you! I invite you also to call the monastery prayer line with your intentions any time; the number is on their website: www.rockfordpoorclares.org. I’ll take my leave with a blessing from St. Clare that my soon-to-be Novice Mistress gave to me: May Almighty God bless you, May He look upon you with the eyes of His Mercy and give you His peace, May he pour forth His graces on you abundantly And in heaven may He place you among His saints. Amen!
  2. 6 points
    ToJesusMyHeart

    i got married!

    hello! i used to be a frequent poster here but have since moved on. i wanted to update, however, my new state in life! i joined the sisters of life as a postulant in 2014 but decided to leave to marry. i got married 6 weeks ago! my husband and i are now trying to have a baby. if you could pray for us to be successful in that endeavor, i would be grateful. thank you! p.s. i am trying to upload photos but it says my files are too large....how do i make them smaller so i can share photos of the wedding? thanks!
  3. 4 points
    Antigonos

    i got married!

    What you have described is known in Jewish thought as "shalom bayit" [literally "peace of the home"] and is regarded as the essential reason for the establishment of the institution of marriage. Indeed, in the blessings recited in a Jewish wedding, one concerns finding blessing and contentment in each other as a Divine gift; the birth of children, while a mitzvah, is not something any couple can ultimately be absolutely sure about [indeed, there's still, with all medical advances, approximately 20% of infertility which has no known cause] -- only God does. There's a Jewish saying that God spent 6 days creating the world and ever since then, He's been arranging marriages. It's pretty much a full time job <g>
  4. 4 points
    OneHeart

    What if it's not possible to live a vocation?

    This is a really good topic, and one close to my heart. In fact, I was just thinking about this topic and what I would say about this about 6 hours ago, on my commute to work, before I read this post! Hmmmmm A lot of the posts here with suggestions on how to respond to your situation. Lots of good food for thought there. But I'd like to offer my own thoughts on the whole notion of "can you be prevented" from fulfilling a vocation, or "can life go so increadibly wrong that it can't be made right". I'm not sure if this is exactly what you are asking. They are questions I have had to ask myself. And I've gotten a lot of advice, some helpful some not so much. If my words offend anyone, I'm really sorry. And if anyone feels that I'm talking about them, please just forgive me and pass along. I'm just sharing my own experience. My life went wrong, very early, very wrong. And I've been trying to get it on track for decades. This isn't a statement of hopelessness, but the reality is that my life will always be marked with events of the past. There is no way I can overcome some things. Nature never forgives. I feel that I missed my vocation, in the sense that where I'm at now is not what I was made to be. So I've had to reflect very seriously on this and see how to consider this in order to not become bitter, or give up, or just sit and cry. So, here goes: Truth: Not everything that happens is "God's will." And sometimes things do go awry. I think this applies differently to people who are trying to do well and just get side-swiped by life; vs some people who flat out are intentionally outside of God's will, doing their own thing, seeking the world. The later are clearly "missing God's call in their life". That type is the real tragedy. And, they can definitely get back on track (conversion). So consider this type -- I really don't think anyone here is that type at all! But let's consider this. Because, you see, if it is possible for someone who is unbaptized, unchurched, un-everything, to be utterly converted to right relationship with God through reception in the Church, then, isn't it likely the same thing with regards to the other type of people also, the people who are trying to do God's will but get sideswiped? And, in truth, aren't we all a little of each? Thinking in terms of "that was then, this is now", then, it is possible to take a look back and see "oops, I missed that call" to the point that "here I am now" (not where I am "supposed" to be), but that at the same time, when you look at "here I am now", it is absolutely possible (because conversion is always possible) to "get on track" and "do God's Will". But what does it look like when this happens? Now, it's true that "God always forgives, man sometimes forgives, but nature never forgives." In light of that statement, "where I am now" is dictated by the natural consequences of events. Some of those events were way beyond my control. (In my case, I was raised as an atheist, introduced to very bad actions early on, and went head long the way of the world. I find myself, therefore, dealing with multiple consequences of that set of events.) Was this where God intended me from my birth? No, I don't think so. However, He allowed it. He certainly did. And, I've come to believe that during everything that happened, even some pretty significant abuse that I suffered at the hands of others, He was there. Yes He was. He held my life in His Hands before I was conceived and He looked down the years, and saw everything, knew everything, and looked at me and said "yes, this one, I want to create this one." This is the mystery of God's permissive will, and I don't pretend to understand it. But I, as everyone else, live it. I find myself thinking "what if". What if I hadn't been exposed to this, if this event hadn't happened, if I had been treated this way not that way. Where would I be now? I think I would have been in a community of religious. But that presupposes a perfect world, a perfect life, that never went astray. And that kind of thinking is a little bit dangerous, don't you think? God allows the innocent to suffer at the hands of the guilty. That is the history of redemption. Our Lord did it, and He is our standard. Suffering means, well, experiencing pain. The pain of "not being where I'm most comfortable to be, of not being where my soul cries out to be". That's pain. So many people with mental challenges who know they will never be married, they cry a lot. Is it "God's will" that they not be married? Well, no....... but yes. There is an amazing component of our Faith: "Oh Glorious Fault". St. Thomas Aquinas wrote a hymn about it, and others have talked about it. It is, essentially, the notion that although we were made for paradise (Eden), God allowed the fall in order to bring about some even greater good: Heaven. Heaven is higher and more glorious than even paradise on earth. It is beyond the beyond of anything we could possibly imagine. We can imagine Eden. It's earthly. But heaven is only possible AFTER the fall - after everything goes completely haywire. Total and utter destruction that only God Himself could redeem. And even more amazing, is that the fall isn't "Plan B". It isn't like God said "oops, now I have to send My Son...." No. That was the plan all along. Some say that that is what made Satan so angry. Tee hee. And so too, when a life "goes awry" and an individual isn't able to follow the path they would chose for themselves, it may be a sign that God has somethign even better for them. Because grace is available in toto at every moment of every day. Oh how He loves us. Oh glorious fault! Oh redemption so bright! So, when I'm considering "what might have been if things had been perfect", I also tell myself not to think that. Did the events of my life prevent my "vocation"? Sort of. But actually, God wants me right here, right now, exactly in the total mess that exists right in front of me. Why? Because this way I will glorify Him much more. By being resurrected out of the dung heap, and by resurrecting not only my soul, but the facits of my life as well, God is showing how mighty He really is. Will I ever be in that nice community I dream about? Probably not. And it hurts. Yeah, it hurts. A lot. But sin hurts, doesn't it? And the effects of sin are a broken world. Anyone who says anything else is selling something. My life is broken. But God is putting it back together in a way that I never would have dreamed of. Never in a million years. There is an artform in Japan where they make these beautiful china vases. Gorgeous creations. And, when one of them is broken (falls or whatever), they don't throw it away. They take the pieces and painstakingly put them back together. And they don't just use glue. They put them back together with gold filler. Real gold. So that the cracks become a golden pattern throughout the vase. Oh Glorious Fault! How rich His mercy! How much more beautiful the gold He has put in my brokenness, than would be anything I could possibly create as if perfect! I don't know if I'm explaining this well. My life now is a life being redeemed one step at a time. And when I think "What is my vocation", I look at God's Hand in my life and not just the natural propensities that I was born with. My natural propensities would suggest community life. My circumstances suggest that if God want's me consecrated, it will be a private consecration. Just a few months ago, due to circumstances, I had to step back from entering a community that I had visited. (I liked them, and they liked me, and it wasn't just the idea that they take older vocations. It was potentially a good fit.) I stepped back, and cried - again - and my VD and I looked again at private consecration. I'm working on a private rule, and maybe that will bloom into an eremitic consecration, maybe not. Who knows. This is not what I would have chosen if I had been writing the game plan from the start. It is not what I would have chosen - but wait...... a "vocation" is a call from the OTHER, not my own self-willed self determination. So, hmmmm.... There are a lot of saints who "missed" their vocations. One of my personal favorites is St. Joseph Benedict Labre. Others were kicked out of the Orders they started. One of the keys to sanctity is finding the grace in every moment and responding to THAT grace (not some other grace). What is the grace of this moment?....... What I want is for God's redemptive work in my life to be greater than His original creative work in my life. That is living a life of grace. This doesn't feel good. But this isn't about feeling comfortable. This isn't about having consolation. This is about accepting suffering that is due to things not in my control (other people's actions, circumstances etc). Going beyond what I think logically makes sense. Trusting beyond my own natural abilities. Loving God in all things no matter what. If you really look at the lives of a lot of the saints, (NOT the caricatures from the children's books that make them look like they were born with a halo and made everyone smile), their lives are full of disasters, missed appointments, misunderstandings, rejections, failures. It's not about having a nice life. The Cross is precisely opposed to that. But if you lean into the Cross, you may find that instead of splinters, you get a big hug. I know: it's hard. Believe me, I know. Hang in there! Please pray for me.
  5. 3 points
    ToJesusMyHeart

    i got married!

    thank you! baby is the size of a vanilla bean seed and burrowing into my uterus!
  6. 3 points
    Kateri89

    i got married!

    I feel badly that the thread turned out this way. Your original post was simply a happy announcement and after a lengthy thread and debate, you’re defending yourself. I hope all the commenters responded with good intentions but it’s a real downer to be so excited about being a newlywed and then find yourself on the defensive end of the ensuing discussion. To everyone: I’m all for discussions about Church teachings, but I don’t think that the OP invited this debate with her initial post.
  7. 2 points
    MIKolbe

    So can two straight best friends get married now?

  8. 2 points
    Lilllabettt

    Kanye West - JESUS IS KING

    Maybe Kanye will convert Olsteen to Christianity.
  9. 2 points
    CatherineM

    Pope Francis

    I remember being asked some legal questions about the beginnings of the crisis 25+ years ago by our Archbishop. His mind just couldn’t conceptualize abusing a kid, so he didn’t know what to do. I think that happened a lot. By the way, Pope Francis has a great handshake. It would pass muster in Texas.
  10. 2 points
    Norseman82

    A quantum experiment suggests there’s no such thing as objective reality

  11. 1 point
    Dogtag

    Catholic Church incompetant

    Jesus has called us all to a life of extraordinary holiness. Yet there are so few living saints. Most don't even think that being a saint (or the closest thing to it that is possible) in this life is even an option. How did we get to the place where everyone is planning for purgatory and not going for the great prize now? Why is the Church unable to teach people how to actually fulfill the promises of Christ?
  12. 1 point
    Ice_nine

    i got married!

    congrats!
  13. 1 point
    Pax17

    Mental Illness & Bipolar Disorder

    That's good news...thanks for the update.
  14. 1 point
    Seven77

    Catholic Church incompetant

    I think it's because a lot of people don't know or understand that we are actually supposed to be Jesus and completely transformed into him. That's what it means to be a Saint, something that begins here and now. There are organizations in the Catholic Church that strive to educate fellow Catholics about their call to greatness, willed by God. One of these is the Institute of Catholic Culture, www.instituteofcatholicculture.org. They offer free talks – – free adult education which comprises an entire curriculum for learning about the faith. The material is out there. People just don't know about it. God didn't create us for just barely making it, he created us to represent him and make him present in the world by allowing him to live his life in us. To be one with him. I think that there are two extremes… The Protestant idea of once saved always saved: it's all a done deal, I don't have to do anything really other than get people saved like me so they don't have to do anything either. The other idea would be similar, Catholics thinking they would be saved, hopefully at the moment of their death, until then they don't have do anything other than take care of material needs, because God knows I'm a good person. Both of these take salvation for granted. Combine that with an idea that we can't really know truth, coming from the secular culture. The reality is, only saints go to heaven (which is ultimately not floating on clouds playing harps as disembodied spirits). I think it is up to us to live as saints and get the Word out. … How do we do that is the question…
  15. 1 point
    Dogtag

    Dog abortions

    I don't like them. Perhaps using the word "ethics" regarding them is a bit too serious, they are just dogs. I think if life is truly sacred then it should imply a respect and reverence for other forms, even if we do not ascribe to them the full dignity of a human person.
  16. 1 point
    Ice_nine

    Mantilla

    no one ever said anything to me in real life. Just folks online have shown their general attitudes that they might not be so forward with in polite face-to-face dealings
  17. 1 point
    Luigi

    Dog abortions

    This web site is devoted to Preaching Holy Apostolic Truth. Not to dog breeding.
  18. 1 point
    truthfinder

    Mantilla

    It wasn’t solely veils - it was head covering whether veil, shawl, hat, or for the forgetful, a Kleenex.
  19. 1 point
    Pax17

    2019 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    New Poor Clare novice: http://pcheartponderings.blogspot.com/
  20. 1 point
    little2add

    So can two straight best friends get married now?

  21. 1 point
    Ice_nine

    Mantilla

    I wear a hat. Do people think that's low class and/or not good enough. The trad dress codes and general attitudes towards dress trigger me tbh. I don't know how people have enough energy to make fashion choices. I basically just wear clothes so I'm not naked, and I wear a hat at mass because I think it covers the general spirit of veiling (actually covering your head) even tho it doesn't *look* like veiling per se. Whoops I guess that's kind of a side rant.
  22. 1 point
    AbigailGermaine

    Mantilla

    I've been wearing a mantilla for more traditional Masses and in chapel at the monastery for a while now, and never heard anyone say you should wear it with the point forward... But it does appear that that is the traditional Spanish way.... With a fantastically tall comb... Like this photo of Queen Sofia. The manilla I use at home has a normal, flat hair comb sewed in the front, which works well, the one I use at the monastery I just pin on with Bobby pins (I get a tiny bite of hair, weave it up and through the veil, then back down into my hair..... Might not choose to do it exactly that way if it was delicate lace, but this is pretty sturdy polyester lace) That seems to be the way most US Catholic women are wearing theirs.... I don't know how one would keep it on the other way without the huge comb. I But really, there is no 'right's way.... Just attach it to your head somehow....
  23. 1 point
    truthfinder

    Mantilla

    Traditionally, Spanish mantillas do have the point at the front. If you google images of them, you’ll see it being held up by a giant comb. I’ve heard this being used against those who do cover their hair as “they can’t even wear it right”. I think this is one of those things that it originated out of Spanish custom but became its own thing. Many mantillas could not be worn this way because they do not have a proper point. Honestly don’t worry about it. Now, for it not slipping. I had bought mine from Veils by Lily with the little clip sown in. It does not budge. I’m sure you could sew on a similar one if you wished. Otherwise, with a previous veil, I’d slip a bobby pin on each side, sort of behind the temple and above the ear, through the netting of the veil. Worked well enough.
  24. 1 point
    Dymphna

    Sisters of Maria Stella Matutina

    The letter of the bishop (published in the same place as the final document to which I was refering before) doesn't say at all that formation in philosophy is not good. It does say, though, that formation in a religious community cannot be based primarily on philosophy, and that careful discernment is needed regarding the philosophical teaching of Fr. Philippe. This seems to touch on two subjects: First, formation should be about human formation and about biblical and other theological subjects as well as philosophy. This is, as far as I know, standard in religious communities, but seems to have been somewhat neglected by the brothers up to now. Second, Fr. Philippe may well have written impressive books, but he also was a systematic abuser who first ignored Vatican sanctions as early as 1957 and went on commiting crimes and covering up crimes of others for decades. Was he a "split personality" who wrote good things, but acted completely against them - or are there elements in his writing/teaching which make systematic abuse easier, eg. by encouraging an authoritarian struture? (just an example, I don't know his writing.) This danger needs to be adressed, and therefore his writings need discernment. I myself am a bit of a fan of the community of l'Arche, founded by Jean Vanier, who got a lot of spiritual advice by the brother of Fr. Marie-Dominique Philippe, Fr. Thomas Philippe. I was shocked when I learned that Fr. Thomas, similar to his brother, had systematically abused women in l'Arche over many years, so I can sympathise a bit with you. I'd just talk openly with the sisters of this community about the horrible crimes of Fr. Philippe and see how they react - if they still defend him now I'd run quickly, to be honest.
  25. 1 point
    Nunsuch

    Sisters of Maria Stella Matutina

    I am a historian of religious life, and these anti-Catholic books were total frauds. Please don't suggest that they had any credibility. There are plenty of secondary sources you can read which definitively prove this. Just... NO.
  26. 1 point
    BarbaraTherese

    Mental Illness & Bipolar Disorder

    I am reading yet again, a beautiful little book "The Love that Keeps Us Sane" by Marc Foley OCD (Carmelite priest). On pages 80 and 81 (of 93 pages), I read the following words which reminded me of something said in this thread by another member: In another part in the little book (I cannot find it hence am paraphrasing) Marc Foley writes that he did not want to write a book about holiness, rather about sanity. What he discovered in writing the book is that sanity and holiness are one and the same. __________________ I think that I need to grasp that my life as it is has not come about accidentally or by chance. My life as it is, as unremarkable and ordinary as it is consisting of nothing but trifles, is as God Wills it to be, as He has permitted it to be. Very mysteriously, no matter how unremarkable and trifling a way of life, it is contributing in potential*** to the salvation of the world. Hence, my focus must shift off the paltry nature of my life as it is to me, and focus on the fact that the mystery of it is that it is God's Will for me and in Him has outstanding potential, remarkable and supernatural potential. ____________________ *** The "in potential" factor in life is to ask myself, am I living my life for and in God - lovingly for the Love of God? The desire to do remarkable things for the Glory of God may well be that as prime, it can also be - deep down - a desire to glorify oneself. ______________ https://www.amazon.com/Love-That-Keeps-Sane-Illuminationbooks/dp/0809140020 Abandonment to Divine Providence is available online on the CCEL website. It is important that a purchased copy of this work does include the Letters by de Caussade in the rear - not all copies includes the Letters. CCEL "Abandonment to Divine Providence" online (including the Letters): https://www.ccel.org/ccel/decaussade/abandonment
  27. 1 point
    Hna.Caridad

    Francis Church Is 666? Or Nah?

    Delivery, please clarify the intent of your post. Are you advocating for the assault of the Pope or his assassination?
  28. 1 point
    Ice_nine

    Joined the Knights

    I recently learned about Peter Claver. He is certainly a light in a dark history. That's cool that he has a . . . group? Knighthooddom. I don't know words :/
  29. 1 point
    cappie

    Christ the King

    Today as a Church, we conclude our liturgical year and celebrate the Feast of Christ the King. The Gospel we proclaim shows the great mystery of our faith: In the moment of his crucifixion, Jesus is shown to be King and Saviour of all. St Paul in the Second Reading speaks of Jesus not only as head of the Church, but as ruler of all things in heaven and on earth, the one through whom all things were created. So much comes together here, that if this feast didn't exist, it would almost be necessary to invent it. That is exactly what happened in 1925, when the Catholic Church decided that there ought to be a feast that specially underlined the all-embracing authority of Christ. Originally set for the last Sunday in October, in 1970 the feast of Christ the King was moved to the last Sunday before Advent. Today's Gospel shows us, Jesus' kingship is not of this world -- it is far bigger than that and more glorious. Jesus, the king who reigns from the cross, promises the repentant thief that they will be together in Paradise that very day. He has judged the "good thief" worthy of citizenship in his kingdom. Today it is a good idea to take a couple of minutes to look at why we call Christ king in the first place. Some people think we should throw out the word "king" as a relic of an old, oppressive era, but that is sadly ironic, because in that mystery of Christ's kinship is the root of our liberation. Christ is King because he is the Son of God. He is both perfect human and perfect God, and because he is God, he is ruler of all that is; sole ruler because God is one. None other is worthy because only the one who created everything has the power of absolute rule over his creation. Christ is King because he has redeemed all creation, and especially human nature, bringing us the promise everlasting life and peace. By taking our nature on himself he restored in us the image of God which we vandalized by our disobedience and self- separation from God. By becoming human, and by taking upon himself not only our nature but the punishment due us for our sins, Christ restored the God-life in us and peace between us and God. Jesus is always telling us that God's kingdom is within us, making his role as our restorer and redeemer doubly a kingly one. Christ is King because he is lawgiver, judge, and the one who executes judgment. He is the source of the Law come among us in our flesh to show us perfect obedience to the Law, and he is the same one who will return at the end of days to be our judge and to carry out the sentence he passes upon us. It is in his mercy as our kinsman in human flesh, as well as judge and king that our hope lies. And finally, In the Advent weeks to come the song "O Come O Come Emmanuel" will probably find itself in our liturgies. As we sing, we remember that this promise is fulfilled, then on Christmas, our King will come to us in the form of a helpless baby, to explain himself by living where we can see and hear, touch and handle him. For now, however, maybe the best we can do on this Feast of Christ the King is to bow in awe and worship, ascribing to him as is most justly due, all might, majesty, dominion, and power, henceforth and forevermore. So, for today we go -- out to witness by our lives this Love incarnate!
  30. 1 point
    BarbaraTherese

    Mental Illness & Bipolar Disorder

  31. 1 point
    Luigi

    Mental Illness & Bipolar Disorder

    Indeed, God is outside of space and time. Meaning, I don't even understand it - my mind is not given to theoretical physics - but I'm willing to accept it. On the other hand, WE are not outside of space and time. And God - being omniscient and all - knows that. So God reveals information to us within the limits of space and time. *************************** Another, more long-range, approach that could be beneficial would be to take a theology class of some sort. I don't know what exactly, but talk to a priest, a theologian, a spiritual advisor, or somebody like that. You shouldn't have to figure out this stuff all by yourself - the Church can put two millenia of distilled theological reflection at your disposal, one way or another.
  32. 1 point
    Luigi

    Mental Illness & Bipolar Disorder

    There is an evolution - actually better thought of as a revelation - here. The God of the Old Testament is often interpreted as wrathful, and then with the incarnation of Jesus, we see revealed the fully loving God. Jesus did still say some pretty "harsh" things if you tend to interpret things harshly - "Be perfect as your Father is perfect," "When you've done all that you can, say I've done no more than I should have" and that kind of thing. But overall, Jesus revealed God's love - "The kingdom of God is at hand," "I'm going to prepare a place for you in heaven," the Good Shepherd, the forgiving of sins (70 x 7), establishing the sacraments, the sending of the Paraclete, and lots more. And even that Old Testament image of God isn't as wrathful as a lot of people like to depict. Creating Adam and Eve wasn't wrathful - God wanted to share his creation with his creatures. Giving them full access to (nearly) all the good things in the Garden of Eden wasn't wrathful. Leading the Jews out of Egypt and giving them a promised land wasn't wrathful. The wisdom books aren't wrathful. Most of Isaiah's preaching images aren't wrathful. I could go on. So Church teaching can be seen a having two parts, and the parts can even be seen as conflicting, which may be what you mean by "Catholicism is very much a schizophrenic thing (to my eyes)." But if you look at the conflicting parts chronologically, you can see that the New Testament teachings have fulfilled - and replaced - the Old Testament teachings. Thus the difference in names. And we live in New Testament times.
  33. 1 point
    Lilllabettt

    i got married!

    Yikes.... Well, according to your own words, you, like everyone, have a natural vocation to marriage as well. So you chose between good vocations, both of which, according to your words, you have. Wasn't that the point of the homily you posted - we are all called to marriage naturally and all invited to the practice of the evangelical counsels as well? ((Although can one really say for certain they have a vocation to consecration, if it is never confirmed by the Church? )) I hope your dream comes true. God has a way of separating us from attachments, one way or another, however. So my humble suggestion, meant in kindness, is that you do your best to cultivate a kind of holy indifference where God's gifts, including children, are concerned.
  34. 1 point
    CatherineM

    Visit went well

    Our visit went well. I got to try out my horrible Spanish since the Pope doesn’t speak English. Here’s the interview my husband gave afterwards. EWTN
  35. 1 point
    ToJesusMyHeart

    i got married!

    My vocation is to be consecrated, but I reject my vocation because I want marriage and children. I chose to reject it and I chose to marry instead. Now I am doing what I can to achieve my dream of motherhood. That's all I care to say on the matter.
  36. 1 point
    Lilllabettt

    Visit went well

    Idk, he doesn't have to like getting his hands kissed. But it's uncharitable to make guests feel awkward or embarrassed. Based on a number of reports that could be an area for growth for PF.
  37. 1 point
    CatherineM

    Visit went well

    We were told not to expect it. I once saw him quoted that he just never acquired the ear for it. To be honest it was very okay with me that he didn’t speak English with us. It was the first time I got to have a conversation with someone where my husband couldn’t interrupt. Maybe he sensed that. Plus, he seemed irritated that my husband kissed his ring.
  38. 1 point
    sr.christinaosf

    Thoughts from a Franciscan Sister

    For some reason, of late, I've found myself frequently mouthing a simple, ancient prayer:, found as far back as the book of Revelation: "Come... https://ndfranciscans.weebly.com/blog/come-lord-jesus
  39. 1 point
    nikita92

    Mental Illness & Bipolar Disorder

    "Inability to pray" Can you please explain what that consists of? My perspective- God isn't going to punish you if you can't do it! Millions upon millions of people don't pray as well. Don't be so hard on yourself!
  40. 1 point
    little2add

    Father Ricardo gone viral

    Practicing for the team
  41. 1 point
    BarbaraTherese

    Long Island Catholic diocese sues to end Child Victims Act

    God bless you also, Josh. Thank you for the underscore that any anger on your part is not directed at me personally - Josh, I never felt that it was. In fact, I share your anger and revulsion. This has to stop and I think it is what an awful lot of angry Catholics want stopped, rather demand (and rightfully and virtuously) that it be stopped. Ours is a "righteous anger". Pope Benedict in his book Faith and The Future reminded us of what some bishops were doing on the eve of the French Revolution: " The process will be long and wearisome as was the road from the false progressivism on the eve of the French Revolution — when a bishop might be thought smart if he made fun of dogmas and even insinuated that the existence of God was by no means certain" Hence I am not surprised with the behaviour of some of our bishops and certainly do not condone such behaviour right up to the top. Cardinal Pell here in Australia has been granted one last Appeal, result should be known early 2020. We all are in my book. I now and then reflect on the words of Jesus "Father, forgive them for they know not what they do". In my book we have no real understanding of what sin is - until I can call myself a load of s h i t, then maybe I have some little insight anyway. The first step in overcoming a problem is identifying that one has one. I take comfort (and we all can) in that Jesus has said "The righteous have no need of Me, I have come for sinners". No one should ever despair of God's Mercy and The Church teaches this. If the Love and Mercy of God is Infinite, how can finite creatures despair of it. Whoever you heard the above from, Josh, was feeding you nonsense. If we commit serious sin and tell God we are sorry and aim to confess it at our next opportunity, we are not destined for Hell. I personally believe too that if one is in serious sin and repents of it and then dies, they would not go to Hell. I am unsure of what The Church teaches about that so as to be able to state quite confidently what The Church does teach.***(I did a bit of research, Josh, and found the video below from Catholic Answers - and a good one to keep on file I think) Mine too. We are not saved by our works, rather we are saved by our Faith (works are a by product and incidental to Real Faith) but it has to be a Real Faith that is alive and active.......and not a dead faith. ________________ I can't read the article, Josh, it is whited out after the first few words. I am certainly in favour of victims being able to fully protect their identity in every way. ____________ *** I think that the key words in the video below are (paraphrasing) that Jesus instituted the Sacrament of Penance but that God and His Love and Mercy is not bound to and by His Sacraments. Jesus did not incarnate without leaving commands and instructions by which He calls us to live out our journey. He has told us much about the fruits by which we can be identified as well as criteria for being His disciple. If my Faith is in Jesus can I then discard His Words, His commands and His instructions?
  42. 1 point
    ToJesusMyHeart

    i got married!

    I think we have a different understanding of "vocation." My understanding matches the sentiments in this helpful homily by a priest-monk at St. Michael's Abbey: http://104.236.240.51/helpful-homily
  43. 1 point
    BarbaraTherese

    Long Island Catholic diocese sues to end Child Victims Act

    God bless you and yours also, Josh. https://www.catholiceducation.org/en/religion-and-philosophy/spiritual-life/the-church-will-become-small.html "CERC Catholic Education Resource Centre. Pope Benedict in his book Faith and The Future:........... "The church will become small and will have to start afresh more or less from the beginning. She will no longer be able to inhabit many of the edifices she built in prosperity. As the number of her adherents diminishes . . . she will lose many of her social privileges. . . As a small society, [the Church] will make much bigger demands on the initiative of her individual members.... It will be hard-going for the Church, for the process of crystallization and clarification will cost her much valuable energy. It will make her poor and cause her to become the Church of the meek . . . The process will be long and wearisome as was the road from the false progressivism on the eve of the French Revolution — when a bishop might be thought smart if he made fun of dogmas and even insinuated that the existence of God was by no means certain . . . But when the trial of this sifting is past, a great power will flow from a more spiritualized and simplified Church. Men in a totally planned world will find themselves unspeakably lonely. If they have completely lost sight of God, they will feel the whole horror of their poverty. Then they will discover the little flock of believers as something wholly new. They will discover it as a hope that is meant for them, an answer for which they have always been searching in secret. And so it seems certain to me that the Church is facing very hard times. The real crisis has scarcely begun. We will have to count on terrific upheavals. But I am equally certain about what will remain at the end: not the Church of the political cult, which is dead already, but the Church of faith. She may well no longer be the dominant social power to the extent that she was until recently; but she will enjoy a fresh blossoming and be seen as man's home, where he will find life and hope beyond death."
  44. 1 point
    Delivery

    Long Island Catholic diocese sues to end Child Victims Act

    No problem. Wasn't sure if I understood you correctly. The first comment I believe was by a Catholic. The second by a former Catholic woman with a bunch of little kids. I don't find the comments offensive at all. I actually agree with most of it. I get what you're saying how you couldn't read everything. I will check the material you posted when I have some time. Thank you. God Bless.
  45. 1 point
    cappie

    THIRTY-THIRD SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME C

    Today we listen to these Biblical stories about the end of all things, about “dreadful portents and great signs from heaven” and the day of the Lord burning like an oven, and how not one stone will be left upon another. We always hear this as we get close to Advent. In the first century, the temple was the centre of Jewish religion, history, culture, civilization and civic pride, King Herod had recently completely renovated it—making it quite a bit bigger and a whole lot more elaborate. In its thousand-year history, the Temple had never been as glorious, as extensive, or as popular as it was when Jesus and his disciples visited. It was seen as the ultimate thing in Israel—and as central and indispensable, to the plan of God and the fate of the nation. When Jesus and his disciples visited the temple for the first time, the disciples were awestruck. Jesus isn’t quite as impressed, and he says two things about the Temple. Firstly, he predicts, quite correctly, that the Temple would soon be completely destroyed which is that the Romans did about 35 years later, after an unsuccessful Jewish rebellion. Secondly, as he predicts the destruction of the temple, and the chaos that goes with it, Jesus also says, (again quite correctly) “the end will not follow immediately.” The temple will crumble, there will be problems, but there will still be much to do. There will be people to help, and evil to resist, and prayers to say – just like before the Temple was destroyed. So, the temple falls, but “the end will not follow immediately”. That must have been a hard thing to hear. It was almost impossible for anyone in Israel to imagine the destruction of the temple. After all, everyone knew that the Temple was the ultimate thing, the final thing: if it went, everything else was sure to go, too. But that was wrong. The Temple was not the ultimate thing after all, it was only one of the penultimate things, something that was next door to ultimate, maybe, but that’s all. The main thing, the one truly important and indispensable thing, is God, and what God is up to. Everything else is penultimate. Everything else takes a back seat. Everything else can—and will—crumble to dust. Who God is and what God is up to – this is what abides, this is the main thing. This alone is ultimate. When the Temple actually fell, (and the world did not end) the little Christian church in Jerusalem (as well as many Jewish groups) faced a huge crisis of faith. Lots of people then simply could not separate what was most important and most valuable and most immediate to them from what was most important and most valuable and most immediate to God. They had confused the ultimate with the penultimate. And something very much like that is still with us. We all have our temples, we all have our own ideas of what is indispensable, these may be personal things, or religious things, or social things, or cultural things, or election results, things we cannot conceive being otherwise, or doing differently, or losing – things we cannot imagine that either we or the world or God could ever live without. So, every now and then, we need to be reminded that these things are not quite ultimate. It’s very important to be able to make this distinction—to be able to realize that our special concern, our pet project, our current passion, is not really the same thing as the kingdom of God, or the will of God. This whole business of the last things, the end of the world, all of that is here to remind us that our stuff, no matter how important it may be, our stuff is not ultimate. It will all pass away. Instead, it is who God is and what God is doing, right now among us, that is of ultimate importance. Nothing else matters nearly as much, nothing else will matter for so long. The point is not to hang on tight to what we have. The point is to keep our eyes and hearts open. In our troubling times, Christians are being persecuted perhaps more than ever. Our temples, our churches, are literally being torn down in parts of the world. War and violence are widespread. Those are not future predictions but present realities The words of Jesus spoken in Sunday’s Gospel are words meant for us today, not for some future time. “By your perseverance you will secure your lives." No matter what is happening around us, we are to remain strong in our faith in Christ. We are to trust in the Lord’s promises.
  46. 1 point
    Lilllabettt

    Pope Francis

    You can't underestimate the capacity for denial for some people. Some of the popes could have 100 people tell them it happened, unless they see a video or something, they choose not to believe it. It's extremely unlikely they didn't know at least of the accusations. Like, when Pope Francis said he didn't know about the accusations about McCarrick... I'm sorry. It's extremely difficult to believe. I, as a teenage nobody whod been in the church all of 1 year, knew about those rumors when I was in college in DC, 15 years ago. Possibly PF is doing some jesuitical mental reservation to justify himself saying that and it not being a lie. Eg maybe he tells himself, I heard about the abuse of seminarians but not of kids, therefore I can say I didn't hear about it. Idk. It was extremely disheartening when he refused to answer the accusations from the Vigano (sp?) person, like he wanted the press to dig in case there was something that compromised deniability. And then after a year when nothing turned up, then he finally said "I knew nothing", which is just really, really hard to take.
  47. 1 point
    Peace

    i got married!

    Marrying a nun? That's what's up. How can I pull that off without getting excommunicated?
  48. 1 point
    Peace

    Separation from my church

    I wasn't actually being serious when I wrote that . . . that is just my particular way of responding to @KnightofChrist. Yeah, an eternity in hell would be just a tad bit worse than not getting along with your parents. Just a tad though. I didn't read the post as her parents suggesting that if she is no longer Anglican she is being ungrateful and unkind. I dunno if they are prohibiting her from going to Mass but maybe that is something she can clarify in a subsequent post. Well if that is all he meant I have no objection to that. But I think he meant more than that. At least to me, he seemed to suggest that mere participation a non-Catholic Christian church will eventually lead to hating the Catholic Church, or vice-versa. I do not think this is true. We are not talking about two faiths that are fundamentally opposed to each other here. Catholic Christians and non-Catholic Christians are both members of the body of Christ, although the latter less perfectly. Sure those situations are different but I do not think the Church would absolutely forbid a lifetime of attending Protestant churches. If so why would She allow for mixed marriages? If a Catholic and a Baptist get married and the Catholic guy and his wife go to Mass at 7am, what would be wrong with him going to the baptist Church with his wife at 9am? Is it not a good thing that they should worship together and respect each other's faith journey, for the sake of harmony? I don't think that the two must be placed in absolute opposition to one another, such that participation in one is a detriment to the other. In fact, I think the opposite could be true in many cases. But that is just my two cents.
  49. 0 points
    Kateri89

    Prayer Request

    I don’t see a prayer intentions board anymore so I figured I’d post this here. Please say a prayer for my sister who told me she is planning to have her boyfriend move in with her in January. She knows how I feel about it for obvious reasons but I also have reservations about him aside from that. Please just pray that they at least change their minds about this.
  50. 0 points
    Lilllabettt

    i got married!

    Your article talks about an unmarried woman called to parenthood. And here in Chicago, I know of one priest who has adopted a foster child. And the reverse is true, too - plenty of people marry with the expectation or the hope of being parents, but God ultimately doesn't call them to that. I was blessed in that, when I got married, my husband was aware there was a decent chance we would never be parents. He discerned his vocation was to love me, fully, holding nothing back, the end. Whether that love led to kids or no kids. And that vocation, to love that way, when it is directed at another human being, is called marriage. My sister married in large part because she thought 'being a mom' was her calling. When they found she was barren, she asked her husband if he would have married her even knowing she couldn't conceive. He answered "I don't know."

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