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    BarbaraTherese

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    Luigi

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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/17/2019 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    Kayte Postle

    Kayte Discerns (An Ongoing Journey)

    Pax phriends! I am so joyful in this new year! So much is happening that I'd love to share. The community I wrote called me and I had a lovely conversation with the VD. I was open, and kinda blunt about my journey this far, my struggles, my joys, and the shortcomings in myself that I have discovered along the way. She was very sweet, and very receptive to me! This community is 100% okay with my medication needs, and would even want me to continue treatment should I hypothetically enter someday. This has been the most joyous news for me! The VD has invited me to a discernment retreat with them in mid-Feb, and I had more than enough airline miles to cover the trip. The only thing I had to pay for was $11 in processing fees, God is good! In other news I have applied to graduate school for to get my Master's in Clinical Mental Health Counseling. I've been wanting this for a long long time, and finally felt like it was time to take the plunge. This has been a challenge given my discernment, but I am at peace with where I am at right now. I also know for a fact that this community is willing to work with me on being able to finish my Master's should we discern for me to enter before it is complete. Especially since my coursework is in line with the apostolate of the community, and my coursework will 100% be online. I have had to tell my family about my continuing discernment, given I will be flying out of state for almost a week in Feb. There had been some major miscommunication and they had thought I was completely done discerning when I decided to take my break. This has not gone over well. My sister is neutral, but my mother is extremely hostile to the idea. When I told her over the phone, there were many tears, much yelling, and an insistence that this path is "absolutely impossible" for me to pursue. To say the least that really hurt, even though I knew that would be her reaction. My SD and I have talked about this and he has encouraged me to continue moving forward despite my mother's loud objections. He has also reminded me to be loving and patient with her through this process. If you could pray for my family and their hearts during this time, that would be appreciated. Lastly I am transitioning into an "old-new" job. I've worked in a very similar capacity, but am changing employers. I'll be working at the Children's Hospital in my city, and I could not be more thrilled (and a tiny bit nervous). God is great though, because my schedule will allow me to continue to attend daily mass every day, and be home at a decent time in the afternoons. I'm doing super well and continue to grow in many areas each day with the love and grace of our Beloved. I'm always praying for you all! Love you pham.
  2. 2 points
    Kateri89

    Francis Chan becoming Catholic?

    For those who don’t know who Francis Chan is, let me give a quick overview. He is a Protestant pastor who used to run a mega church and then left it (I think because he felt that he was becoming too proud - the church had about 5,000 people attend weekly). He and his wife and kids downsized their home because he felt that they didn’t need so much space and the money they made from downsizing was used for ministry. He wrote the popular book Crazy Love which I myself read about 10 years ago. It inspired me to start sponsoring kids through World Vision. I’ve always believed that he is a very sincere man who practices what he preaches. Anyway, he just recently preached a sermon and I’ll post it below, but it sounds like he isn’t too far away from becoming Catholic. I think with enough prayers, especially the Rosary, our Lady will guide him home so please pray for him.
  3. 2 points
    tinytherese

    Netflix: The Two Popes

    https://www.ncregister.com/daily-news/the-two-popes MOVIES | NOV. 27, 2019 SDG Reviews ‘The Two Popes’: Papal Bull Starring Anthony Hopkins and Jonathan Pryce Are savvy performances enough to save a caricature pitting God’s Rottweiler against the People’s Pope? Steven D. Greydanus For a Catholic critic — or at least for this Catholic critic — a movie like The Two Popes presents a number of temptations. There is the temptation, first of all, to review the movie the way the blog Bad Astronomy used to review movies like Armageddon, cataloging technical or factual inaccuracies both minor and vast. Among the more glaring howlers, for example, is the considerable conflict during a 2012 meeting between Anthony Hopkins’ Pope Benedict XVI and Jonathan Pryce’s Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio, the future Pope Francis, over whether Cardinal Bergoglio’s motivation in submitting his resignation prematurely, before turning 75, is an act of protest against the conservatism of Benedict’s papacy. Out of concern to avoid the appearance of protest, Benedict refuses to accept the resignation. Notably, screenwriter Anthony McCarten, adapting his own stage play The Pope, is well aware that this is nonsense. In his nonfiction book The Two Popes: Francis, Benedict, and the Decision That Shook the World, McCarten correctly notes that Cardinal Bergoglio was 75 in 2011 when he submitted his resignation as required by canon law — and that it is entirely customary for such resignations to stay on the pope’s desk for months or longer before being officially accepted. So there was no possible hint of protest or concern of such; Cardinal Bergoglio’s age in 2012 has been fictionalized for the sake of imaginary conflict. (I have a hunch that when he wrote the stage play McCarten may have been confused by the five-year gap between the age of mandatory episcopal resignation, 75, and the age at which cardinals are no longer eligible to participate in papal conclaves, 80. In the film, though, he clearly knows what he’s doing.) Another critical temptation is to debunk the film’s schematic interpretation of its present and future popes as embodiments of, respectively, hidebound conservatism and enlightened progressivism, instead emphasizing the commonality and continuity between them. Such a response could take the form of a familiar genre of Catholic apologetic commentary that consists of cataloging passages in the writings of Benedict that some might find surprisingly progressive, as well as notably traditional themes in the writings of Francis. For example, a casual viewer of The Two Popes might be left with the impression that the future Francis cares about the poor and the environment while Benedict cares about tradition and rules. I could easily fill the space of many reviews rebutting that impression with citations from Benedict’s advocacy for the poor, the rights of migrants and refugees and environmental concerns. To catalog factual inaccuracies, or the substantial convergence of Benedict and Francis, are useful and important undertakings, but cataloging is not film criticism. The Two Popes is historical fiction, but still fiction. Hopkins and Pryce are playing characters engaged in imaginary conversations, not reenacting history. To press historical figures in a work of fiction into symbolic service as embodiments of ideas or principles, even in tension with their real views, can be legitimate in principle. In its defense, the debate dramatized in the film reflects a real conflict playing out every day in parishes, seminaries and Catholic social media venues. The real Benedict was never the “conservative,” nor the real Bergoglio the “progressive,” that the film makes them — but the types are real enough, and I’ve met them both (both types, I mean). After an unendurably shrill quarrel around the 30-minute mark that ends with Benedict snapping, “I don’t agree with anything you say,” the dialogue — set partly at the Pope’s summer residence of Castel Gandolfo and partly in a remarkable set recreating the Sistine Chapel — becomes more thoughtful, fitfully moving and occasionally even profound, elevated by the tension between its two immensely gifted stars. Hopkins, investing Benedict with tragic dignity and quiet self-awareness, has the more interesting performance. He gets better lines, too. “There’s a saying: God always corrects one pope by presenting the world with another pope. I should like to see my correction.” Pryce’s Bergoglio, of course, is horrified by Benedict’s intention to resign. “Christ did not come down from the cross,” he insists. In a way, despite their unreconciled differences, each becomes the advocate for the other’s papacy. On a deeper level, Cardinal Bergoglio is conflicted over what he sees as mistakes during his tenure as provincial superior of the Jesuit order in the 1970s during Argentina’s Dirty War, when two of his priests were abducted and tortured for months. Rather than criticizing the military junta, he remained silent, trying to work behind the scenes to protect his priests — a strategy that led to accusations of complicity. (Less plausibly, the film seems to couch the cardinal’s genuine opposition to liberation theology and Marxism as part of this strategic attempt to pacify junta authorities.) This chapter in Bergoglio’s life is dramatized in flashbacks with Argentinian actor Juan Minujín playing the younger Bergoglio. Notably, Benedict gets no such flashbacks; from his confession that he “sinned” in his youth “by not having the courage to taste of life itself,” instead hiding in books and study, perhaps we’re meant to gather that there was nothing to tell. On the other hand, the “Nazi” slur is twice thrown at Benedict by random Italians, and while Cardinal Bergoglio registers dissent from this, the slur is never answered. Fictionalizing the views and actions of real-life figures for the sake of drama can be defensible, but there are limits. A drama about, say, George H.W. Bush’s 1988 presidential bid would probably have to acknowledge in some way how he struggled with “the vision thing.” To unironically depict him as a wonky Elizabeth Warren-like candidate with detailed plans for everything would probably be a bridge too far. The very first contrast that The Two Popes draws between its title characters, at the 2005 papal conclave after the death of Pope St. John Paul II, is the proposition that Cardinal Bergoglio, who does not want to be pope, is therefore worthy of the office, while Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, who does desire the papacy, is unworthy. This is the first plank in the movie’s case for Benedict XVI as a pope rejected by God. When Benedict begins talking to Bergoglio about his plans to resign, he describes seeing smoke from snuffed candles trail downward, “like the rejected sacrifices of Cain.” In case that’s not cinematic enough, Brazilian director Fernando Meirelles (City of God) throws in a quick clip of lightning striking the Vatican during Benedict’s papacy. It would be hard to imagine a single creative choice more centrally false to Ratzinger’s character than the claim that he was ambitious for the papacy — and, once again, to correct the record one need look no further than McCarten’s own book, notably the chapter accurately titled “The Reluctant Pope”! A lifelong academic and scholar, Ratzinger has always been happiest in study, and his time of service under John Paul II as prefect for the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith was a burden he looked forward to setting aside, not a stepping stone to higher office. Three times over the course of more than a decade he asked to resign and be allowed to go back to writing in solitude, or perhaps to live out his days in the Vatican Archives. John Paul not only refused him each time, but continued to “reward” him with further responsibility. McCarten himself repeatedly uses “reward” just like that, in ironic scare quotes, stressing just how little Ratzinger wanted any of this. It’s as if he set out to write the definitive rebuttal of his own drama. (Perhaps someone should write a story called The Two McCartens.) This is not, for me, mere fact-checking. Since I’m obviously not remotely unbiased, let me put my cards on the table: While I’m not an uncritical fan of any of the three popes of my adult life, in a real and important sense I love and admire each of them, both for the real continuity among them and also for their individual contributions. (My problems with each of them, likewise, include both particular and shared issues.) It would be impossible to overstate the foundational importance of Ratzinger’s thought for me since I began studying Catholic theology nearly 30 years ago. The suppleness of his intellectual engagement with modernity and postmodernity has contributed more than any other Catholic thinker to the set of intellectual tools I bring to thinking about what it means to be Catholic today. To see Hopkins as Ratzinger barking, “Change is compromise,” as if he were some reactionary neo-scholastic manualist standing athwart Vatican II yelling “Stop,” is almost physically painful for me. The relatively hagiographic portrayal of Jorge Bergoglio is less grating, at least until the last minutes as the film becomes a sort of infomercial, complete with rock soundtrack, burnishing Pope Francis’ image as a crusader and reformer. At one point when Pope Benedict asks Cardinal Bergoglio what he would do with his papacy, the cardinal suggests cleaning up the Vatican Bank. “Good luck with that,” Benedict smiles wryly. I’d like to think that’s a subtle nod to the disappointments of Francis’ papacy in this area. Toward the end, as the Pope and the cardinal each confess to the other, Benedict confesses that he “should have known” about the predatory crimes of Father Marcial Maciel, the notorious Mexican priest and the founder of the Legion of Christ and Regnum Christi. Though the sound mix drops his voice for part of the confession, the implication is that Cardinal Ratzinger did nothing. “You forgot to love the people you were meant to protect,” Francis charges, and Benedict, agreeing, asks for absolution. The horrific reality is that no pope has ever responded effectively to clerical sex abuse. After the neglect of John Paul II’s papacy, Benedict was a relative improvement, but he was too timid and too concerned with addressing abuse quietly. That said, even as CDF head Cardinal Ratzinger was actively concerned about Father Maciel, but the priest was powerful and protected by John Paul II and other powerful men in the Curia. (Perhaps Benedict is here dramatically conflated with John Paul II and apologizes on his behalf.) As pope, Benedict removed Father Maciel from leadership in 2006, but it was too little, too late. Francis’ leadership, both as archbishop and as pope, has likewise been marked by myopia and blunders in this area. Despite occasional effective moments, The Two Popes is undermined by the same penchant for Wikipedia-like biography and oversimplified caricature marking McCarten’s other biographical screenplays, The Theory of Everything, Darkest Hour and Bohemian Rhapsody. McCarten has been extraordinarily fortunate in the casting of his subjects over the years, and any of these films are almost worth seeing for the performances alone. Still, what Roger Ebert wrote about Memoirs of a Geisha applies to all of these films: The more you know about the subject matter and movies, the less you are likely to enjoy them. Deacon Steven D. Greydanus is the Register’s film critic and creator of Decent Films He is a permanent deacon in the Archdiocese of Newark, New Jersey. Caveat Spectator: Thematic content and some violent images. Teens and up.
  4. 2 points
    Kayte Postle

    Kayte Discerns (An Ongoing Journey)

    Happy and blessed Advent my lovely pham! It has a been awhile since I posted here and wanted to give a quick update. I have done a lot of work in prayer, therapy, and spiritual direction on some deep wounds in my life. I found I was wanting religious life for several wrong reasons, and as I said earlier halted all discernment. Once bringing these issues to light especially in therapy and prayer, the Lord has done a wonderful work in healing me. I am still very much drawn to religious life, but for almost completely different reasons now. I've had my eyes kinda opened in my prayer life, and I was waaayy to constricted in what I thought religious life had to look like. It's actually really freeing discovering the beauty in the wealth of expressions of religious life. I wrote one community for more information a couple of days ago (it was a super late night decision to write before the new year, probably should have held off, but what's done is done). I'm excited about going this direction again, and feel so very different than I ever have before in this process. I'm so thankful to God for every no I have received up to this point. I'm at peace with myself, and living my single life right now, but excited to see what God has in store for the future. Love you all, and see you again in January! Many prayers for you all, pax!
  5. 1 point
    BarbaraTherese

    Bad catechesis in religious ed

    There are members on Pham here more aware and educated than I am - I hope they will respond. My thoughts only are as follows: Congratulations for choosing the role as a teacher's aid in your parish. I am sorry to read you have had the experiences you have - and experiences that now weigh rather heavily on you. It is not going to be easy, nor is there any understanding available of outcome or final result, but I would have a quiet word with the teacher. A next step where your situation is concerned will depend on the result or outcome and you might need to speak to the DRE. In fact, the DRE should be aware of failings in religious instruction of children. It is his or her responsibility under the pp. You also bear a responsibility as an aid. I think it could be presented to the DRE as a general type of confusion on your part, rather than making an accusation about the teacher you are helping. You could present the above to the DRE as your confusion about the program. It is of vital and central, primary, importance that children understand the essence of The Eucharist - that on which our Faith depends. To state that The Eucharist is symbol only is in fact heresy and denies the Real Presence. Vocation is indeed a choice, but it is The Holy Spirit (or God to little children I would think) that a person even considers a certain vocational path. How one would present that to third graders, I have no idea at all. -
  6. 1 point
    DameAgnes

    pics of carmel in west lakeland minnesota

  7. 1 point
    dUSt

    Secular Movies that portray Catholicism well?

    The Irishman (Netflix) is definitely not family friendly but is does portray the church in a positive light. Surprisingly, The Two Popes (Netflix) does as well, even though it somewhat villianizes B16 and church tradition in the beginning.
  8. 1 point
    Delivery

    Secular Movies that portray Catholicism well?

    I saw it. It's long and slow but a good movie.
  9. 1 point
    Luigi

    Secular Movies that portray Catholicism well?

    I haven't seen it yet, but the reviews I've heard say "A Hidden Life" portrays Catholics in a positive light.
  10. 1 point
    Amy Subbiah

    Do communities ever "test" their Novices?

    Well..in those days i guess it was difficult to swallow because thete is no real dialogue to build a healthy relationship. Its only yes or no. You either take it or leave it. All they will say is offer it up to the Lord.
  11. 1 point
    BarbaraTherese

    "Grieving" What is Not My Vocation

    Spot on. Prayer for your continuing journey.
  12. 1 point
    Luigi

    Secular Movies that portray Catholicism well?

    "In This House of Brede" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tJTvbTmv5Yw
  13. 1 point
    little2add

    Secular Movies that portray Catholicism well?

    Jesus Christ, Superstar good movie, great soundtrack
  14. 1 point
    rkwright

    Would you call the cops?

    In Texas the police have the ability to “arrest” an individual they believe is a danger to themselves or others and transport them to a mental health facility. They’re evaluated by doctors at that point. It’s called an emergency detention (if you live in Texas). This is all in the officers discretion and there is always a chance they take them to jail for the threats or whatever. The jail is not a great place for anyone much less the mentally ill.
  15. 1 point
    monica_margaret

    Would you call the cops?

    That sounds tough -- after trying to engage with her a couple times as you said I think it's best if you stop for now and leave her alone. If I were you I'd speak to someone else about it after Mass, first. I'd say calling the police might be a last resort; definitely, though, let someone else know and see what can be done. Maybe even try to talk to your parish priest about it before next Sunday (unless she even does this at daily Mass). Obviously I haven't been there so I'm not entirely sure, but that's what I think might be a good course of action to take for now. Prayers!
  16. 1 point
    BarbaraTherese

    Prayer Request - Sth Aust Bushfires

  17. 1 point
    nikita92

    Do communities ever "test" their Novices?

    Yes yes yes to every thing you just said!! Thank you for that! I really appreciate that you actually touched on what I have been thinking & feeling all this time.
  18. 1 point
    Fr. Antony Maria OSB

    Still searching

    The charism you're describing isn't very common (in my experience), but it does kind of remind me of the Society of Our Mother of Peace. They do not have any foundations in Europe that I am aware of, though. Their information can be found here: http://www.marythefont.org/
  19. 1 point
    Martyneeky

    NOVENA TO ST MICHAEL

    NOVENA TO ST. MICHAEL THE ARCHANGEL AND IN HONOUR OF THE NINE ANGELIC CHOIRS http://maryourhelp.org/St-michael-the-arch-angel-novena.html In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost, Amen. Come Holy Ghost, fill the hearts of the faithful, and in kindle in them the fire of thy love. V. Send forth thy spirit, and they shall be created. R. And thou shall renew the face of the earth. LET US PRAY Oh God, who by the light of the Holy Ghost, didst instruct the hearts of the faithful, grant that in the same spirit we may be truly wise, and ever rejoice in His consolation, through Christ our lord. Amen. V. Thou, o lord will open my lips. R. And my tongue shall announce Thy praise. V. Incline unto my aid, o God. R. Oh lord, make haste to help me. V. Glory be to the father, etc. R. As it was in the beginning, etc. EXAMINATION OF CONSCIENCE PSALM 51 Have mercy on me, oh lord for i have sinned. In your compassion blot out my offence. O wash me more and more from my guilt and cleanse me from my sins, my offences truly I know them, my sin is always before me, against you, you alone, have I sinned, what is evil in your sight I have done; that you may be justified when you give sentence and be without reproach when you judge, oh see, in guilt I was born, a sinner was I conceived indeed you love truth in the heart, then in the secret of my heart teach me wisdom, oh purify me, then I shall be clean, wash me, i shall be whiter than snow, make me hear rejoicing and gladness, that the bones you have crush my trill. From my sins turn away your face, and bloth out all my guilt. A pure heart create for me, oh God, put a steadfast spirit within me, do not cast me away from your presence, nor deprive me of your holy spirit, give me again the joy of your help, with a spirit of favour sustain me, that I may teach transgressors your ways, and sinners will return to you. Oh rescue me, God, my helper, and my tongue ring out your goodness. O lord, open my lips, and my mouth shall declare your praise. For a sacrifice to take no delight, burnt offering from me you would refuse, my sacrifice, a contrite spirit. A humbled, contrite heart you will not spurn. In your goodness, show favour to zion, Rebuild the wall of jerusalem, then you will be pleased with lawful sacrifice (burnt offering wholly consumed) then you will be offered young bull on your altar. Glory to the father, to the son, and to the holy spirit, as it was in the beginning, is now and ever shall be, world without end. Amen CHAPLET OF ST. MICHAEL THE ARCHANGEL (OFFICE OF THE NINE ANGELIC CHOIRS) THE FIRST SALUTATION IN HONOUR OF THE SERAPHIM In the name of Jesus and Mary, I salute you St. Michael, glorious Prince of the choir of Seraphim, and all the angels of this burning choir of love. I thank you, Oh holy angels, for your most ardent love of God and Mary, the queen of this choir. Inflame me and all men with your purest Angelic love, that with you we may love God here on earth and one day for all eternity in heaven. One Our Father, Three Hail Marys, One Glory be, etc. THE SECOND SALUTATION IN HONOUR OF THE CHERUBIM In the name of Jesus and Mary, i salute you St. Michael, glorious prince of the choir of the cherubim and all the angels of this choir. I thank you for your great zeal for the glory of God. As one day, you fought against lucifer and his host to defend the honour of the incarnate word and His blessed mother, so now defend us, your little helpless brethren, against the same powerful enemy that our hearts will always be pure and undefiled, real tabernacle of Christ, santuary of the Holy Ghost, temple of the most adorable Trinity. One Our Father, Three Hail Marys, One Glory be, etc. THE THIRD SALUTATION IN HONOUR OF THE THRONES In the name of Jesus and Mary, i salute thee St. michael, glorious prince of the choir of the thrones and all the angels of this choir. O heavenly spirits whom God has appointed to preside over nations, kingdoms, dioceses and religious communities, guide and rule over us inspire and direct the heart of men so that many saints may arise in every nation and ever religious community. In particular, i greet and salute the angel who, by the will of God, preside over our community. Pray, bless and intercede for us. We promise the obedience and reverence. One Our Father, Three Hail Marys, One Glory be, etc. THE FOURTH SALUTATION IN HONOUR OF THE DOMINATIONS In the name of Jesus and Mary, i salute thee St. Michael, glorious prince of the choir of dominations, and all the angels of this choir. By the will of the most high, you assist confessors, preachers, superior of religious institutions, teachers, and all who spread the kingdom of God. We humbly pray and beseech you, convert the heretics and infidels, bring back to the faith the fallen away catholics, illuminate the mind of men and inflamed their hearts that soon maybe but on fold and one shepherd. One Our Father, Three Hail Marys, One Glory be, etc. THE FIFTH SALUTATION IN HONOUR OF THE PRINCIPALITIES In the name of Jesus and Mary, I salute thee St. Michael, glorious prince of this most exalted choir of the principalities, and all the angels of this choir. To your loving care God has committed each parish. You watch over every tabernacle and offer your sanctus in reparation for the scandals, the coldness and indifference of the hearts of men. You pray for the dying and that the little ones may receive the sacrament of baptism. I unite my prayers to yours, especially with the angels of this parish. One Our Father, Three Hail Marys, One Glory be, etc. THE SIXTH SALUTATION IN HONOUR OF THE POWERS In the name of Jesus and Mary, i salute thee St. Michael, glorious prince of the power of powers, and all the angels of this most exalted choir. Protect us against the powers of darkness, especially against temptations of pride, anger, and impatience, that with your assistance we may constantly advance on the road of perfection. One Our Father, Three Hail Marys, One Glory be, etc. THE SEVENTH SALUTATION IN HONOUR OF THE VIRTUES In the name of Jesus and Mary, i salute thee St. Michael, glorious prince of the choir of virtues, and all the angels of this heavenly choir. You assist pious souls in the most important task of their purification. Assist us, o holy angels, assist us oh holy angels, that we will not only have the will, but adopt the means, that we may never dread the sacrifice but with your help and assistance we acquire one virtue after another so that the splendour of God's own sanctity may be reflected in us. One Our Father, Three Hail Marys, One Glory be, etc. THE EIGHTH SALUTATION IN HONOUR OF THE ARCHANGELS In the name of Jesus and Mary, I salute thee St. Michael, glorious prince of the most exalted choir of the Archangels, and all the angels of this Choir. Glory and thanksgiving be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Ghost for creating you and for assuming from your midst the seven Archangels who stand before the throne of God. we most humbly pray and beseech the Holy Archangels to teach us and those dear to us the science and wisdom of saints. One Our Father, Three Hail Marys, One Glory be, etc. THE NINETH SALUTATION IN HONOUR OF THE ANGELS In the name of Jesus and Mary, i salute thee St. Michael glorious prince of the most exalted choir of the Angels and all the Angels of this choir. Paused in awe and astonishment, God has appointed one of the princes of this heavenly host to be the custodian of every man one of them is appointed to watch over me, to guide, to even served me. My faithful friend, my deares brother in the Holy Angel. I greet you a thousand times in the name of Jesus and Mary, i thank God that He made thee so beautiful and so powerful. One Our Father, Three Hail Marys, One Glory be, etc. Then say the Our Father, four times, in conclusion: the first to St. Michael, the second to St Gabriel, the third to St. Raphael, the fourth to our guardian angel ANTHEM Oh glorious prince St. Michael, chief and commander of the heavenly host, guardian of souls, vanquisher of rebel spirit, servant in the house of the divine king and our admirable conductor, who does shine with excellence and superhuman virtue, vouchsafe to deliver us from all evil, who turn to thee with confidence, and enable us by thy gracious protection to serve God more and more faithfully everyday. V. pray for us, oh glorious St. Michael, prince of the church of Jesus Christ. R. That we may be made worthy of His promises. LET US PRAY Almighty and everlasting God, who by a prodigy of goodness and a merciful desire for the salvation of all men, has appointed the most gracious archangel, St. Michael, prince of thy church, make us worthy will beseech thee, to be delivered by his power protection at the hour of death, and may we be conducted by him into the August presence of thy divine majesty. This we beg through the merit of Jesus Christ our lord. Amen http://maryourhelp.org/St-michael-the-arch-angel-novena.html
  20. 1 point
    Dymphna

    Do communities ever "test" their Novices?

    Well, I'm totally unfamiliar with religious life back then, but this doesn't sound like a "test" to me. I also notice when people are not making eye contact with me (and instead with others), last time I told someone (at an appropriate time) they hadn't noticed at all. I'd guess it means that the novice mistress was more interested in / in tune with the other candidate than you. That can happen. The really interesting parts of your experience are what followed: First, that you were very upset by this sisters rude behaviour, I guess this is understandable since you were probably young and in a tense situation. And second, the reaction of the community leader, which in your description sounds like she didn't exactly behave in a mature way. Sounds like her instincts were to defend her sister, instead of showing a bit of empathy - which she could have done even if she believed that what you were describing was just a product of your imagination. So, you're probably right, you weren't meant for them :-)
  21. 1 point
    BarbaraTherese

    Prayer Request - Sth Aust Bushfires

    Thank you, P60. Our bushfire victims are having problems with looters too. Police are now patrolling affected areas due to the looting. Arson is beyond my comprehension - the mentality of a person or persons who would light bushfires in our current conditions especially just defies my imagination even. I was truly shocked by the Christchurch disasters and my heart went out to New Zealanders. Both in New Zealand and here in the face of disasters, I am edified by the attitudes of those affected.
  22. 1 point
    little2add

    Bad RTL student, not

    CNN agreed on Tuesday to a settlement with Covington Catholic High School student Nick Sandmann, who filed a lawsuit in March seeking $275 million against the cable news network. A spokesman for CNN confirmed with the Cincinnati Enquirer that a settlement with Sandmann had been reached. The amount of the settlement was not revealed.
  23. 1 point
    penitent60

    Prayer Request - Sth Aust Bushfires

    Naturally, I have been closely following the bush fires in dear old Oz. A lot of family live in at risk areas. Hope you are staying safe BT and the air quality isn't just too horrific. I really feel for the asthmatics and those with respiratory conditions. I am especially glad that the volunteer firies have got funds coming in from the public and I HOPE the federal government and state governments pitch in.
  24. 1 point
    MaryBethany

    What is "good mental health"?

    Thank you all for your replies! Food fir thought. I think eventually you'll only know for sure if you can live the life if you try, but I'll need to feel like I'm ready.
  25. 1 point
    Dymphna

    What is "good mental health"?

    Thanks for that! Alternatively, you could just type the thread's subject "how healthy is healthy enough" into the search box up right here - it just came up for me as first/only result (without/with quotation marks).
  26. 1 point
    AbigailGermaine

    veiling outside of Mass?

    I veil all the time.... I have since I was pretty small... At the time, we were closely associated with some Anabaptist groups and it rubbed off. I currently wear a basoc, nondescript black bandana, but I've done various and sundry other things... If you Google Christian headcoverings, you'll get lots of website with ideas. As Lillabett said, just try not to imitate a nun... I don't think it's a need... but it is beautiful when you see it. I do it now both because of personal devotion, and because after almost 10 years of head covering since I was small, I would feel naked without out it.....
  27. 1 point
    nikita92

    Do communities ever "test" their Novices?

    I would like to thank everyone for their posts. Let me explain alittle of what I perceived had taken place (without naming any particular community I had visited in the past) It still has left a profound memory of when I think back about it. (which comes and goes even to this day) Why?? Because I was left questioning myself on was it my imagination or were they possibly "testing" me in some way! First of all, keep in mind that I was only in the pre candidate state at that time, on my first "Come and See" with them! I will try and briefly explain. Back story-I have worked in the Maritime security field for 9 years and community based security for over a year. In years passed, I have been trained in "observing body language", being "aware of ones surroundings" aspects of security just to name a few training classes. As religious sisters/nuns go, I will acknowledge that they have vast experience interviewing perspective religious candidates that suits their particular community. It was during this informal meeting (in the living room of the convent) with the novice mistress and another candidate (who had been on her second live in visit) I quickly noticed (as the conversations were taking place) that when I was commenting, asking, answering etc.the NM would wouldn't give me eye to eye contact as I was doing so!!turn to the other woman and engage with her as I was talking. It became so obvious (as I was closely watching her body language) that it was falling into the RUDE category! I became upset and quickly had to leave the room to go to my room to process what had taken place and calm down and collect and contain my emotions. Even though I trust in my training and ability to read situations and people, I had to consider that Sister may have not be aware of how she was presenting herself. Later that early evening, Mother A came to my room to inquire about my absence from meal time. (I elected to forgo the rest of community time) As I tried explaining to her what I felt had taken place, adding my (trained) observations to back them up..she would have no part of it and totally disagreed with everything I had to say! I believe she even became upset with me! I felt so terrible, I couldn't wait for the next day to come so I could fly back home! Mother A and another sister drove me to the airport. While we were cordial to each other, the atmosphere on the drive there was somewhat tense. Later I found out, that the other candidate had went on to professed first vows with the community; of which I was really happy for them all! Even after the years have gone by, I still can't help but think, was my perception off, or maybe it had been some kind of "test" by the NM! ( hence my question on here) If the answer (by the comments that were submitted) is "Not likely" then all I can say was, I was not meant for them! It gave me some valuable insight on myself. I am still in the security field "observing and reporting" ! ( it pays the bills) LOL
  28. 1 point
    rnflower

    any young discerners?

    Hi I am new to Phatmass! I am discerning religious life, and I was wondering if there are any other high school/college students on here also discerning! I would love to chat together :) Thx!
  29. 1 point
    Luigi

    What is "good mental health"?

    FAIR WARNING: I'm no expert... but I have three aunts in religious life, and what I've heard them talk about are things like: 1. Maturity. Can you plan ahead? Can you meet deadlines? Can you live with the consequences of your actions? Are you a self-starter, or do you need someone always standing over your shoulder to tell you what to do? 2. Interpersonal Relations. Can you get along well with others? Not paranoid, not gossipy, not tending to blame other people. Also, if you have a complaint against someone, can you address it with the person? If another person has a complaint against you, can you talk it through without becoming angry or resentful? Can you forgive and forget or do you hold a grudge? 3. Consideration. Are you interested in other people (family, concerns, successes) or do you only want them to be interested in you? Do you clean up after yourself or do you leave a mess for the next person? Do you offer help when other people need it? Do you always have to get your own way, or can you "go along to get along"? 4. Emotional Stability. My three aunts have very different personalities in terms of being outgoing vs. quiet, introvert vs. extrovert, but they're all emotionally stable. In other words, basically friendly, positive, don't lose their temper, thoughtful of others, generous, and so forth. 5. Sense of Humor. This seems to be universal. Not that religious life is a comedy club, but a sense of humor shows that you don't take yourself in an overly serious way, that you can defuse tense situations, and so forth. My categories aren't very clearly defined, and I might not have the right examples in the right category, but you get my point. I think what a community would consider "poor mental health" would be things like ADD (unable to stick with a task until it's complete), overly talkative, self-centered/selfish, emotionally needy, resentful/angry, paranoid, lazy, inconsiderate, and things like that.
  30. 1 point
    Dymphna

    What is "good mental health"?

    I think "what exactly that means" depends very much on the community. Basically, religious communities are worried that someone with health issues (physical or mental) may become a burden for the community rather than an asset. And whatever your issues are, you would need to convince the community that you can live their life without needing much extra support because of your mental health. In the US, this may concern finances (if you need medication), but I think more important is that religious life can be pretty demanding. You would live together with women you haven't chosen (and some of whom may well have mental health issues of their own), and you would probably have lots of work and little free time. Starting out in religious life can be an especially turbulent time, because of the many changes in your way of life. You might not be able to use your usual coping methods, because access to eg. chocolate, the internet or supportive friends could be restricted. Depending on the type of community, additional issues might arise: In an active community, every day might be different, with very little structure, so if you need your daily rituals this would be difficult. In a missionary/international community you might end up living with people from very different cultural backgrounds, which may make forming close relations difficult. In a contemplative community you would have lots of structure - but possibly long times of silence and solitude, where you'd be expected to fight your inner demons on your own. These are the issues that come to my mind - and my guess at answering your question would be that you should be far enough in your recovery to be able to deal with them.
  31. 1 point
    Luigi

    Difference in Charism of Religious Orders

    Few people on this board would be able to give you satisfactory, much less definitive, answers about this. It would take an expert in the field. Some of the Pham might know some elements of each of the charisms and spiritualities you're interested in, but few of us would be able to make a spreadsheet with all the relevant comparisons. But I'm sure the information is out there. If I had time to research this myself, I'd start by reading the Wikipedia entries on each (just for general background, broad overview), then move on to the Catholic Encyclopedia entries (for more of an "insider's view" of them), then move on to the web pages of each order (for what they say about themselves), and then send e-mails to the vocation directors of each order. The vocation directors will be able to give you the most accurate answers, especially of the charism and spirituality as it is lived today (not just the historical developments of each). And I'm sure they'll have the clearest and most concise explanations. Best of luck with it!
  32. 1 point
    Luigi

    Catholic Schools

    It's not that convenient, because that's not all I said. Let me number my reasons for clarity. 1. Catholic schools can teach the tenets of the faith - what Catholics believe - but they can't teach faith itself. Faith itself is a gift from God. So learning the tenets of the faith doesn't mean that any given student will believe and practice what she was taught. 2. Students don't usually choose their schools - their parents choose the school and send the students there. Some students incorporate what they are taught; some merely endure it until their education is complete. Upon graduation, they follow their own beliefs - beliefs not necessarily taught in the Catholic school. 3. Some students, and the parents who send them to Catholic schools, are "cultural Catholics" - neither the parents nor the students are particularly committed to Catholic theology, or living the Catholic faith. But they still identify as Catholic. 4. Some students do internalize Catholicism in their school days, but abandon Catholicism when it comes into conflict with their personal preferences as adults. 5. Catholic schools can be 'hothouse environments' where students are raised to practice Catholicism. When they encounter conflicting ideas later in life, they may abandon Catholicism in favor of new ideas to which they were never exposed. OR, they are taught to live the Catholic way but are never taught the rationale for it, so find it difficult to resist new ideas or new temptations. 6. AND, we live in a secular society that is not only not very faith-based, it's also antithetical to faith. The antithetical-to-faith ideas of modern American society are promulgated through colleges and the mass media. On another point, when I said you'd be better off to ask the people who left the Church why they left the Church, I was referring to the first sentence of your original post: "I have noticed that a lot of people who I know who went to Catholic schools ended up leaving the faith." Go talk to the people you know who left the faith - most of the people on this board are pretty committed to the faith, whether they went to Catholic school or not.
  33. 1 point
    cappie

    MARY, THE HOLY MOTHER OF GOD

    The mother of the messiah has been called many things in the last 2000 years –the Virgin Mary, Our Lady, and the Blessed Mother. But call her “the Mother of God” and you’ll see some Christians squirm. This is nothing new. One day in the early fifth century, a priest preached a stirring sermon in the presence of the patriarch of Constantinople. His subject was the holy mother of Jesus. The preacher continually referred to Mary as the “Theotokos” meaning “God-bearer” or mother of God. This was no innovation–Christians had invoked Mary under this title for at least two hundred years. Nevertheless, at the close of the sermon, the patriarch ascended the steps of the pulpit to correct the preacher. We should call Mary the Mother of Christ, said Patriarch Nestorius, not the Mother of God. She was the mother of his human nature, not the mother of his divinity. His comment sparked a riot. And the dispute rocked not only the congregation, but the entire empire. Cyril, patriarch of Alexandria, Egypt, immediately recognized that Nestorius’ Marian theology was a symptom of a much deeper problem, a problem with the incarnation itself. For to deny Mary the title “Mother of God” makes of Jesus a dichotomy, a split personality. It would mean that God had not really embraced our humanity so as to become human. Rather, the humanity of Christ is hermetically sealed off from the divinity, as if Jesus were two persons, as if human nature was so distasteful that God, in Christ, had to keep it at arm’s distance. It is OK, according to Nestorius, to say that in Jesus, God raised Lazarus, or multiplied the loaves, or walked on water. But it is not OK to say that in Jesus God is born or that God died. Cyril, aware that this was a challenge to the heart of our faith, demanded that an ecumenical council be called to settle the matter. So in 431, the Council of Ephesus met, under Cyril’s leadership, and solemnly proclaimed that Mary is indeed rightly to be honoured as the Theotokos, the Mother of God. It proclaimed that from the moment of his conception, God truly became man. Of course Mary is a creature and could never be the origin of the eternal Trinity, God without beginning or end. But the second person of the blessed Trinity chose to truly become man. He did not just come and borrow a human body and drive it around for awhile, ascend back to heaven, and discard it like an old car. No, at the moment of his conception in the womb of Mary, an amazing thing happened. God the Son united himself with a human nature forever. Humanity and divinity were so closely bound together in Jesus, son of Mary, that they could never be separated again. Everything that would be done by the son of Mary would be the act both of God and of man. So indeed it would be right to say that a man raised Lazarus from the dead and commanded the wind and waves, that God was born that first Christmas day and that, on Good Friday, God died. The Council of Ephesus, once confirmed by the Pope, became the third ecumenical council of the Catholic Church, and its teaching in this matter is dogma, truth revealed by God which all are bound to accept. So why does the liturgy celebrate the Octave of Christmas as the Feast of Mary the Mother of God? The songs we sing and the cards we write extol the babe of Bethlehem as Emmanuel, God-with-us. He is so with us that after Gabriel’s visit to the Virgin of Nazareth, the Divine Word can never again be divided from our humanity. What God has joined, let no man separate.
  34. 1 point
    nikita92

    "Assessment center feeling" - do you know that?

    Understandable that you were nervous, uptight and anxious! (not your usual self) Who wouldn't be in some form or another?! I certainly was on my first come and see! I even went over all my "notes" and questions that I wanted to ask before while I was on the airplane! I think my over exuberance was abit alien to the sisters! LOL Try and not be so negative; (which can be difficult) and more along the lines of "faith" that the sisters will have understanding! For to judge you on only one visit, I would have to think twice about joining such a community in the first place. "If God leads you to it, he will help you through it!" ;-)
  35. 1 point
    little2add

    Feastday of the holy innocence

    Pray for our children and the unborn
  36. 1 point
    sr.christinaosf

    Thoughts from a Franciscan Sister

    : )
  37. 1 point
    little2add

    baby Jesus is born

    As the eve of the day we observe in honor of the birth of the human baby Jesus let us all give thanks to the Holy Spirit. On this day our savor was born… It is fitting and righteous that we gather together our closes friends and family for food and gift giving and to give thanks to the Lord our God , Jesus Christ Merry Christmas to one and all!
  38. 1 point
    little2add

    Happy Christmas all

    On this day, Christmas our savior of man was born, praise be the living Lord. Merry Christmas to all and to all a good night!
  39. 1 point
    KnightofChrist

    Happy Christmas all

    Merry Christmas!
  40. 1 point
    cappie

    THE NATIVITY OF OUR LORD

    In the Gospel the angel tells the shepherds on that first Christmas: “ Do not be afraid. Listen, I bring you news of great joy, a joy to be shared by the whole people. Today in the town of David a saviour has been born to you; he is Christ the Lord. And here is a sign for you: you will find a baby wrapped in swaddling clothes and lying in a manger.’ The first word of Christmas to humans was “Do not be afraid.” The shepherds’ dark night sky was split open by blinding light, so the reason they were afraid is obvious to us, but these words, “Do not be afraid,” are words for us, too. C.S. Lewis wrote about the death of his wife, Joy, with these words: “No one ever told me that grief felt so like fear. I am not afraid, but the sensation is like being afraid. The same fluttering in the stomach, the same restlessness, the yawning. I keep on swallowing.” The reason the angel gives for our fearlessness is that a Saviour is born to us this day. The world Jesus was born into was full of problems and turmoil. The weight of the Roman occupation was felt by everyone, including these shepherds, and made it difficult for most people to see much hope. And every Christmas since the first one has happened in the shadow of war, famine, occupation, and uncertainty and this year drought and bushfires. There has never been a perfect Christmas. Jesus is always born into a world that is fearful and anxious. The hope of Christmas does not lie in our creating “the perfect Christmas.” The hope of Christmas lies in a manger, wrapped in swaddling clothes. The hope of Christmas is a person—and a tiny person, at that. This tiny person, born in Bethlehem, is the reason we no longer have to be afraid. No matter what grief, fear, or anxiety we may feel during this Christmas season, there is hope for us in this baby from Bethlehem. The reason we find hope in this baby goes back to the ancient prophecies we read in Isaiah and other Old Testament passages of Holy Scripture. In our Isaiah reading, we are told this Messiah will be called, “Wonderful Counsellor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.” These are titles that speak to how Jesus helps us today as we face the difficult decisions and challenges of life. This baby born in Bethlehem can be our Wonderful Counsellor. We are often faced with our own powerlessness. We are powerless to change other people and we are often powerless to change our circumstances. This baby born in Bethlehem can be your Mighty God, able to do things you cannot do. The changes and chances of life cause us anxiety. We face uncertainty in our personal lives and in our larger communities. When we look at the wars, oppression, and conflicts between nations, family members, and people groups, it is easy to give up hope for any peace. But this baby born in Bethlehem can be our Prince of Peace. 2,000 years later, we know this baby born in Bethlehem grows up to preach and teach and heal. We know this baby born in Bethlehem grows up and stretches out his arms on the hard wood of the cross so that everyone can come into the reach of his saving embrace. We can see him in his birth, in his life, and in his death, and we can see him in his resurrection. His whole life speaks to the redeeming power of God to provide the ultimate answer to our world’s disease and pain. But on that night so long ago, these shepherds only knew what they had been told by the angel. They knew so little, but their hope was strong. So, they went “with haste” to see this baby in the manger. This is the faith of Christmas: to hear good news and run to meet it.
  41. 1 point
    JHFamily

    2019 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    Year end update (hopefully the numbers are right!) of the Carmel of Jesus, Mary and Joseph in Valparaiso, NE: three new postulants, two new novices and one sister took temporary vows. They also made a new foundation in Australia this year! I know Molly, one of their aspirants. They are fortunate to have her!
  42. 1 point
    BarbaraTherese

    FOURTH SUNDAY OF ADVENT A

    Thank you again, Father. for the always welcome and inspirational weekly homilies. A very Happy Christmas and on in to 2020 to you and to yours............ Barb
  43. 1 point
    ArtistSoul

    Kanye West - JESUS IS KING

    My son & I had the opportunity to meet Kanye last year and the man I met was not the man I had seen portrayed on tv. My son is a huge fan & had heard that he was in town visiting random locations. Kanye & his “entourage” were in the process of leaving one of these locations when my son & I arrived. My son ran up & asked for an autograph & Kanye stopped what he was doing and took time to have an actual conversation with him. They spoke for almost 20 minutes about life, how they both were dealing with fathers who were fighting cancer, and what it takes to be overcome adversity in life. When he finally had to leave, he hugged my son and said “Remember you are always loved” In that moment I no longer saw the hip hop artist I saw the man that he was. He didn’t have to stop for a picture or take the time to have a meaningful conversation with a stranger but he did. It meant the world to my son. To this day my son will get random texts from Kanye asking how he’s doing. I may not always be a fan of his music but after our encounter I will always support him as a man. https://www.instagram.com/p/BpvCrHblRWN/?igshid=p05fpcclfnlc
  44. 1 point
    BarbaraTherese

    Nsw Bushfires

    Certainly the western and eastern coastal areas are ablaze. When I posted previously, I did not realise I was posting into a thread from 2013 and deleted the post.
  45. 1 point
    nunsense

    Nsw Bushfires

    Please pray for firefighters and victims of the bushfires in the state of New South Wales in Australia currently going on.   http://www.theaustralian.com.au/in-depth/bushfires/nsw-bushfires-still-very-dangerous-as-first-fatality-is-revealed/story-fngw0i02-1226742219464  
  46. 1 point
    penitent60

    Heatwave & Air Conditioners

    Oh dear BT.....it is pouring with rain here and I put a cardi on. I love rain, I love green and I love flowing water.....I LOVE NZ.
  47. 1 point
    CatherineM

    Heatwave & Air Conditioners

    I have lived through temps like that. The summer of 1980 in Oklahoma was brutal. Stay safe. I used wet wash rags put in the freezer to keep cool.
  48. 1 point
    BarbaraTherese

    Mental Illness & Bipolar Disorder

    As promised, a reflection on what TS Eliot wrote: "For us, there is only the trying. The rest is not our business" ............ and the spirituality or theology of St Therese in her Little Way. But first a look at the Parable of The Sower. All the sower does is walk along throwing his seeds without concern for where the seeds are landing. Nor does the sower look back to check on results. Or in the terms of TS Eliot, for us there is only the spreading of seeds with no concern for anything else but the effort in throwing our seeds about. Turning to St Therese and her Little Way and quoting from the Book "The Love that Keeps us Sane". ......... Personally, I would not use the above as a hard and fast rule for every single task or endeavour. There is a discernment and a balance to be struck in the spiritual life - but it is not something that I can achieve, only the Holy Spirit can achieve it for me..............IF it is His Will to do so. I really need to go through life with total trust and confidence in The Holy Spirit, there is no other way for me. I go through my days as I think I should in God's eyes, not the eyes of others. As I journey, I trust wholly that The Holy Spirit will push and pummel or perhaps gently nudge or even loudly nudge me into shape. Not the shape I want to be, but the shape God intends for me. All is indeed Grace and Grace is a hidden and silent, humble, worker most often ........... in my life anyway. And He works through the daily circumstances and occurances of the journey............most often
  49. 0 points
    BarbaraTherese

    Prayer Request - Sth Aust Bushfires

    https://www.9news.com.au/bushfires
  50. 0 points
    BarbaraTherese

    Mental Illness & Bipolar Disorder

    In my previous very poor suburb, I would compile a list of what was needed and we all would take something from the list. Christmas Day was a community experience. I am now in a rather affluent suburb and there is no sense of suburb community. It is more pockets of community here and there. Sad

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