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  1. Nunsuch

    Nunsuch

    Chummy Commoner


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  2. Ash Wednesday

    Ash Wednesday

    Mediator of Meh


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      9

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  3. AVEBVM

    AVEBVM

    n00b


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  4. DameAgnes

    DameAgnes

    Chummy Commoner


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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/24/2021 in all areas

  1. AveMariaPurissima

    2021 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    Twelve new novices for the Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist. https://www.facebook.com/dsmme/posts/4371021856295167
    5 points
  2. AVEBVM

    2021 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    I’m entering the Order of Discalced Carmelites on October 7, 2021.
    5 points
  3. PaxCordisJesu

    Benedictine Compline

    I just found these recordings!!! They were filmed for CMAA's virtual music workshop. So glad cause now I can follow along and learn the correct postures as I pray Compline. Enjoy!!!! Oh, btw, these are from the 1962 Monastic Office. So they'll be in Latin with Gregorian chant.
    4 points
  4. Nunsuch

    How to pick an entrance date

    Yes! to all that Sr. Leticia said. For me, September 10 is a very special day, because it is the date I defended my doctoral dissertation and received my PhD. It is only "special" because of what happened in my life, and I remember it every year. It was selected because it was convenient for me and for my entire dissertation committee. The day you enter will be special to you--and, no doubt, to your community, should you persevere. But it's like worrying so much about the wedding that one loses sight of the lifelong commitment of the marriage that it signifies.
    4 points
  5. Sister Andrew

    Ask a Sister a question!

    I didn't pick my own entrance date. It was given to me by my community and if for some reason that specific date wouldn't have worked for my schedule I think they would have just given me another date. In my community you usually don't enter by yourself so the date has to work for a group of people too. We usually have entrance dates in August or September and it's usually a feast day. Mine was on August 22nd, the Feast of the Queenship of Mary. Every community is different but I hope that answer helps! God bless Wow, that's a good question! For me in times of desolation or dry times I try to remember to look back on times of consolation or times where things were going really well. I try to bring to mind the motivations I had when I entered. Though I have matured over time it is helpful to go back to the beginning so to speak and remember the initial call that Jesus put on my heart. Over the years I've learned a lot about myself! Especially during difficult or trying times I tend to make certain assumptions or have certain feelings crop up. it's especially important during those moments to be able to recognize the root of what's causing the difficulty. It's a little hard to type out but basically I can recognize in myself that when I'm reacting a certain way that's not "normal" for me. (ie: I'm getting angry about something little or I'm focusing too much on a mistake I made or something) I can step back and see that there's something underneath it that is being touched upon and I can bring that memory to Jesus and let him speak truth to me. I don't know if that makes sense but there you go! God bless
    3 points
  6. Sister Leticia

    How to pick an entrance date

    Congratulations on being accepted by a monastery. As you say, you're in a bit of a whirlwind right now, what with excitement, telling people and whatever else you need to do. I was surprised when you said you'd been asked to pick a date - presumably within a specific time-frame (eg if you're due to enter in October/November), rather than any date between Jan - Dec! Is this because the monastery is being very respectful of all the things you need to do before entering, such as finishing work/study, sorting our finances, spending time with family...? If so, give yourself all the time you think you might need. The monastery will still be there, whether you enter on 1st October or 30th November, but you will be in a better frame of mind if you arrive calm and rested. I'm writing as someone who didn't enter on a feast day - it was simply the date which was most convenient to my community. But the date is no less special to me for that! And just as the accoutrements of a wedding day can make the day special and provide happy memories, but are not what will ultimately make the marriage last - the same goes for the date of our entry. It might mean something to you in years to come that you entered on this or that feast, but your religious life will not be defined by it. One final thing. Two people have already offered good advice concerning monastic busyness around a big feast. Even if your entrance ceremony will be very low-key, the community would find themselves with one extra thing to do and prepare for. So, have you thought of asking the community what would be most helpful to them? - and then accepting whatever they say if they state a preference, eg for a random day or lesser feast? You're about to embrace a way of life which isn't all about you, and in which "we/us" will come to take precedence over "me", so this would be a really good way to begin. May your time ahead be blessed!
    3 points
  7. DameAgnes

    2021 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    Daughters of St. Paul, two women making first vows on 7/25 https://www.facebook.com/DaughterStPaul/posts/4119558278112928 Ah, and here they are in their new habits, with their names in religion!
    3 points
  8. dUSt

    Home Altar/Prayer Corner.

    Here’s my prayer room. It used to be the phatmass sound booth back when we recorded music. It does face East, mostly by chance.
    3 points
  9. catholicamama

    2021 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    Prayers for our daughter as she will be entering DSMME on August 22nd. I think there are 11 other young women also entering as postulants that day.
    2 points
  10. Peace

    Benedictine Compline

    I don't know why but I've always liked the word "compline". It just has a nice ring to it that makes my mind feel relaxed when I hear it. Everyone say it with me now: compline. Thank you.
    2 points
  11. rosamundi

    Benedictine Compline

    I'm awake fairly early UK time, so it's easy.
    2 points
  12. Ash Wednesday

    Benedictine Compline

    You are like my favorite detector of spam behind the scenes, so I have to express my appreciation for that
    2 points
  13. Peace

    Best sites for TLM?

    I mean, I think it is a great thing to express love for the TLM. I just don't see why that can't be done without trying to tear down the NO.
    2 points
  14. Ash Wednesday

    Best sites for TLM?

    I recommend checking out some parishes or organizations on youtube. My personal recommendations: St. John Cantius, a very popular church in Chicago. They also stream the rosary and Vespers as well Youtube channel URL: https://www.youtube.com/c/StJohnCantiusChurch St. John Cantius in particular has it in their constitution an allowance to offer both forms of the Mass, and have done so for quite some time, even prior to Cardinal Bernardin in the 80s, so they are unlikely to have issues or changes with the recent Motu Proprio so you can rely on them to have regular broadcasts without significant change. St. Mary of Pine Bluff Catholic Church Youtube channel URL: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPOv8zi09j0w0JlN1OTXXOQ Both these churches broadcast masses in both forms, so you would need to check the video labels or their parish schedule for when the steam is TLM
    2 points
  15. truthfinder

    Best sites for TLM?

    Hi Tim, and welcome to Phatmass. I'm really not aware of anything that is consistently pre-recorded and subtitled - because depending on the location and the priest, there might not be anything to 'hear' to close-caption. However: livemass.net is a good option. Its live streams from many of the FSSP's apostolates and will vary between low, missa cantata, and high Masses depending on location. Most of their English Masses are from the US. In order to find something prerecorded, you'd have to find a TLM where they record their services (there's definitely a few parishes that do this on youtube). For the readings, check https://divinumofficium.com/cgi-bin/missa/missa.pl If you scroll to the bottom of the page, and you want to be able to follow the whole Mass, make sure to select "rubrics" and also make sure "Rubrics 1960" are selected - this while almost always guarantee you have the right reading for the day (although this can always change if there is a special local feast that takes precedence). Hope this helps.
    2 points
  16. Nunsuch

    Ask a Sister a question!

    The men's community is much like what life is like for most of the sisters I know. Some might consider them more "progressive" or whatever, but they are generally very highly educated and professionals in their own fields. They are also treated like competent and mature adults who arrange their own retreats, etc. Yes, they do so in dialogue with leadership, but they are assumed to have both common sense and spiritual grounding.
    2 points
  17. Nunsuch

    Ask a Sister a question!

    I think you are looking at a limited range of communities; most permit plenty of freedom to travel, visit family and friends, etc. There are more restrictions during the canonical year of novitiate, of course, but aside from that most sisters I know have a lot of flexibility and travel more than I do! Most communities these days do not encourage entry right after high school. While some do not require college degrees, many do. Maturity is important, regardless of vocation (fewer people get married as teenagers these days, too).
    2 points
  18. SicutColumba

    How to pick an entrance date

    A lot of communities have entrances that depend on the school year or work quarter, so August and September are popular months. That’s usually for active communities, but I have a friend who’s entering a cloistered congregation and her entrance date is a random day in September, not even a feast. The thing is, you could choose a feast day that’s important but doesn’t totally throw off the regular schedule for the community (like that of Our Lady of Victories). Entering on the Assumption would be chaotic but meaningful. Entering on a lesser feast would be meaningful and not too chaotic, because I imagine the regular schedule would be kept even if there’s a bit more festivity.
    2 points
  19. KnightofChrist

    Renaming women “birthing people“

    Birthing people, a term one would expect to find in the nightmare world of some trashy post-apocalyptic novel. It is a term that is dehumanizing for the child and the mother. The world is mad.
    2 points
  20. truthfinder

    Home Altar/Prayer Corner.

    There’s been some very good discussion of praying towards the east within Latin Mass scholarship but which is also reflected in current practice and Christian culture. Ideally, altars in churches should be truly facing east: ie, ad orientem. Coming from the biblical metaphor that Christ, like the sun, will rise in the east. (Were not like muslims praying towards a specific place). However, actual east can be difficult, so the concept of liturgical east exists: whatever way the altar is actually located is liturgical east and the rest of the cardinal directions (relevant for which way the gospel is said etc) are based on that. Christian graves have been identified by their east-west orientation, sometimes even with heads turned towards the east. So I think the admonishment that a prayer corner needs to face east is a bit unrooted in actual practice: we pray with the expectation of Christ’s return.
    2 points
  21. cappie

    EIGHTEENTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME B

    In our gospel for today, Jesus has met the immediate needs of the people. Jesus tells them, “ Do not work for food that cannot last, but work for food that endures to eternal life, the kind of food the Son of Man is offering you, ” The previous day, Jesus fed their physical hunger with bread and fish, now Jesus points them to their spiritual hunger, which is what he really wanted to fill. Jesus compares this to the original bread from heaven, manna, with which God miraculously fed the children of Israel for 40 years in an uninhabitable wasteland. This was the daily bread that would come anew each morning, with enough to last the day and a double portion for the Sabbath. Now Jesus compares the daily bread of manna, which God gave in the desert, to the Bread of Life, which God offers in Jesus Christ. Jesus says, “Whoever who comes to me will never be hungry, who believes in me will never thirst” Jesus offers nourishment, which goes to the heart of our most basic human need to fill a spiritual hunger. Having been created to be in relationship with God, without that connection, we can feel empty. It is an easy move to connect Jesus referring to himself as the Bread of Life to the Eucharist. For in the mystery of the Eucharistic feast we partake of the body and blood of Jesus. But we don’t want to jump to that correct response so quickly that we miss the bigger picture. This discourse comes when there is much more time left in Jesus’ ministry before he gets to that last meal with his disciples. John’s gospel makes clear, the Eucharist is not about Jesus’ death alone. Jesus’ self-giving act in communion is not only concerned with the Last Supper, the cross and the empty tomb. Jesus’ whole life, rather than just one or two events. Put differently, faith is not in Jesus’ death and resurrection alone, but in Jesus’ whole life – from Bethlehem to Golgotha, and beyond to an empty tomb in a garden, Jesus’ appearances to his disciples, and his ascension to heaven. We cannot separate one part of Jesus’ life from the rest. Nor should we have a Christian part of our lives separate from the rest of our lives. We are to take Jesus’ whole story and make it part of our whole story. This is much more than hearing the word, it is word and deed. In the Eucharist, we don’t merely listen to the words, “Take eat,” but we actually get up, come to the altar to take, and eat. God took Jesus’ whole life, blessed, broke it, and gave it to us. We are to let that story of God’s love for us take us, bless us, break us, and give us back to the world. Jesus wanted those who followed him after having their fill of fish and bread to discover real spiritual nourishment so that they would never hunger again. And yes, one is fed through the Eucharist, but this too is only part of the picture. Compare spiritual nourishment to food. Eating out once a week in a restaurant is not unusual. In fact, it is rare to find someone who eats out only once a week. But what if that was the only meal the person ate. Someone who goes back to their familiar seat in a restaurant week after week to enjoy their one meal of the week could never be nourished enough to make it through the remaining six days. In the same way, worship in church on Sunday is meant to be an important part of one’s spiritual food and drink, but it will never sate your hunger if this is your whole plan for feeding you spirit. Fortunately, the Catholic Church has a centuries-old norm of daily prayer that is well suited to filling this void. The Daily Offices of Morning and Evening Prayer are an enriching daily devotion. . It is not that troubles never occur to people who pray and read their Bible; it’s just that those who marinate daily in prayer and scripture are more connected to God as revealed in Jesus Christ. Then whatever comes, they can call on that connection. So much of our lives is spent working for the food that perishes. We must work to earn food, water, and shelter and all the extras that make life enjoyable. But we know there is more to life than the daily grind. For a fulfilled life, one should commit a portion of each day to prayer and reading the Bible, for that is the food that endures for eternal life and the gift of Jesus who came so that you might have an abundant life.
    1 point
  22. truthfinder

    Visitation Nuns of Tyringham, MA

    I can't remember all the ins-and-outs, but this here (https://www.ewtn.com/catholicism/library/obligation-of-the-liturgy-of-the-hours-4604) suggests that only priests have the obligation to say all the hours, and that religious are bound by their own order's constitutions. The sisters may be also be either combining some of the minor offices or else praying them privately which is why they're not on the schedule. One would have to ask. Edit: this is the relevant canon law: Can. 1174 §1. Clerics are obliged to carry out the liturgy of the hours according to the norm of can. 276, §2, n. 3; members of institutes of consecrated life and societies of apostolic life, however, are bound according to the norm of their constitutions.
    1 point
  23. Ash Wednesday

    Best sites for TLM?

    All is forgiven, thank you for taking the velvet hammer in stride. Hopefully we will find some more TLM resources that will be helpful for you, if I think of any I'll post them here.
    1 point
  24. eustace-scrubb2

    Benedictine Compline

    Que?
    1 point
  25. little2add

    Renaming women “birthing people“

    Words mean things. We already have a name for people who give birth to children. That name is mothers. Birthing people” should be a line in the sand for all decent and rational Americans. It is not a question of so-called “political correctness,” which is often a simple matter of politeness. The phrase is not only an insult to mothers everywhere; it is an attack on reason itself. Everyone knows that women who give birth to children are mothers. Those who suggest otherwise are either living in a fantasy world or the kind of people who get their jollies by forcing others to say that 2+2 = 5, which is the ambition of every totalitarian. ’I’m terrified of the woke radicals and the strange vernacular they advocate in the name of racism. Proposed changes to the rules of the U. S. House of Representatives would “honor all gender identities” by eliminating such specific terms as mother and father, son and daughter, and aunt and uncle. Instead, only gender-neutral terms such as “parent,” “child,” “sibling” and “parent’s sibling” would be allowed in the text of the House rules, according to the proposed changes.
    1 point
  26. Ash Wednesday

    Best sites for TLM?

    For what it's worth, I listened to an interview/podcast a while back from a Jewish man who converted to Catholicism and he did hold the opinion that a conservative Jew that is more accustomed to strict formalities in ritual (and in their case praying in a sacred language) would likely have an easier time with the TLM. So that sounds similar to the adjustment you had to make. On the flip side, while a Protestant Evangelical might still find the Catholic rituals in the Novus Ordo a bit foreign -- if it's prayed in the vernacular, it's likely less of an adjustment and shove into cold water for them compared to the TLM.
    1 point
  27. BarbaraTherese

    Australian pro-Gay Law

    Speaking as an Australian, I think that we are multi cultural for sure with many differing religious beliefs, including those who claim to have none at all. I think the time is quite overtly here when we have to acknowledge that Church and state are separate. We need to live our lives the very best we can as Catholics - and as witnesses. Personally, I don't think that criticism of the other, be it individuals or the state is in any way productive - all it does is divide rather than unite. Rather often those actions that divide are hostile with an edge of violence implied i.e. violent protest. I recall when abortion first became a really big issue in Australia. Eventually I bowed right out as it was becoming more and more emotional and filled with hatred and implied violent protest. Later, indeed, it was overtly hatred and violent protest.
    1 point
  28. Sponsa-Christi

    2021 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    I think it can still be useful to have "obvious" questions asked and answered here on the forum. Sometimes people are too embarrassed to ask Sisters in real life, and sometimes they don't know any Sisters to ask. I think it can also be helpful for people not yet ready to begin their discernment in earnest, or for family and friends of people discerning, even just to stumble across information like the fact that religious do generally get proper healthcare. It might address a fear or concern that was in the back of their mind, or that they didn't know they had.
    1 point
  29. Sponsa-Christi

    USACV virtual discerners' conference this weekend

    The U.S. Association of Consecrated Virgins is having a virtual "information conference" this weekend. It's geared primarily toward women discerning this vocation, although diocesan vocation directors and already-consecrated virgins are also invited to attend. More information here on the USACV website
    1 point
  30. AVEBVM

    How to pick an entrance date

    Thanks everyone for your input, I really did need to realize some of this! I will ask the community what is most convenient for them.
    1 point
  31. gloriana35

    Ask a Sister a question!

    Since I have participated on this forum, I have noticed how many who feel a calling to religious life seem to make their contacts through Internet sites. I am not surprised that even life-long Catholics know few, if any, religious Sisters. Communities I knew well have all but died out - when I went to a friend's funeral, the small number of Sisters left (in her once large community) mostly were very old. The 'kids' who were in their 60s I once had known - but very few Sisters were entering during the 1970s. Sisters being highly educated, and in varied professions, is hardly new (though many entered young in 'my time', and were educated later.) What was unfortunate, then , was that many communities wanted Sisters in initial formation to be rather isolated - in some congregations, it might take a Sister a decade or more to get her Bachelor's degree. (I already had an MA when I entered.) Just to use one example, the Sisters of the Holy Child, who were very distinguished for education in England, were sending members to Oxford from the time that university admitted women. Just out of curiosity, I sometimes click the links to communities mentioned here (some are very new - others would not be familiar to me.) I have an impression that certain communities in these categories, who seem to be embracing some practises that were already becoming outmoded years ago (yes, even though the Sisters to whom I'm referring wore modified habits and did not live alone). I gather that some communities are eliminating former permissions for home visits and the like. That was unexpected. May I ask, if this appeals to some who contribute on this forum, why this is so? 'Everyone always being together, doing everything at the same time together...' seems to be a 'selling point' for some congregations. I even have noticed that some new congregations, even if they have a modified veil, wear habits which remind me of those which I saw in childhood.
    1 point
  32. Ash Wednesday

    Judgment

    It's not wrong to judge an action. In fact I'd say that's just part of having a well-formed conscience and knowing right from wrong. But only God knows and can judge the state of someone's soul. For example, sometimes a person will say something about another person on the news like "there's a place in Hell waiting just for them!" and that is judging wrongly and presuming to know the state of someone's soul when that's only for God to know. It's ok to be concerned for someone's soul, but it's wrong to presume to actually know the state of that soul. If you're finding yourself feeling contempt for someone, say a quick prayer for them. It helps a lot. Do you struggle with scruples? Because often someone with scruples struggles with the need for clarity. If you're struggling with knowing what is or isn't a mortal sin, it might be worth having a regular confessor if possible.
    1 point
  33. DameAgnes

    "I never thought I'd enter a monastery..."

    https://aleteia.org/2021/05/19/the-call-of-the-cloister/
    1 point
  34. Nunsuch

    2021 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    No, they are novices. They just don't get the habit until profession. Of course, many communities don't have habits at all--but obviously their members still go through a novitiate.
    1 point
  35. CS937

    Home Altar/Prayer Corner.

    That's stunning!! I'm so jealous haha
    1 point
  36. cruciatacara

    How to pick an entrance date

    I know nothing about religious life but a friend of mine entered on a Feast day and she said if she had to do it over again, she would have chosen differently because Feast days are usually very busy with lots going on so the whole entrance has the added stress of the Feast day. She said she would chose a day that was meaningful to her in some way but not a significant day for the community. Just what I heard.
    1 point
  37. AVEBVM

    2021 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    Well, that’s the date I have in mind right now.
    1 point
  38. cappie

    SEVENTEENTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME B

    The story we heard in the Gospel of John today — about Jesus feeding the 5,000 — stands out in the Gospels. The Gospel writers clearly thought this story was important. It shows up in Matthew, Mark, and Luke but John also includes it. In the Gospel writers’ hands, the feeding of the 5,000 is a parable about what we are called to do and who we are called to be. If we are going to follow Jesus, at some point, he is going to turn to us and say: “You give them something to eat.” And it matters how we respond to his command. God has already given us a world out of nothing, already provided sun and earth and water and seeds. God provides something out of nothing. That is the basic story of creation. But this story is different. Jesus does not make something out of nothing here. No — he takes what God has already provided. He draws out the resources that are already present in the community. As Andrew points out, all they can find is five barley loaves and two fish belonging to a boy in the crowd. But then, Jesus gets them to see what is there with new eyes. The disciples are coming from a place of fear, of scarcity: there will never be enough! Six month’s wages would not buy enough bread to feed them! What Jesus shows us is that whatever we have, whatever God has already given us, is always enough. If we look at it in the right way. If we decide to share. If we let, go of our fear and stop holding onto to what “ours” is so tightly. If we can do those things, we absolutely have enough bread to feed the whole world. That is how Jesus wants us to see the world: 5,000 people on the lakeshore is not a problem. Whatever we brought with us is what we have to share, and there is plenty for everyone, and more left over besides. This is a pretty compelling picture of what the Kingdom of God is like. Here is another way of looking at this story about feeding the five thousand it is the first supper, instead of the last supper. It is important to remember that the last supper is not the only Eucharistic feast in the Gospels. Every time Jesus broke bread with friends, it was a thanksgiving meal (for that is what eucharist means—thanksgiving). Jesus follows the same pattern at this first supper as he does at the last supper. “Then Jesus took the loaves, gave thanks, and gave them out to all who were sitting ready.” Take, bless, break, give: those are the actions of the eucharistic feast. Jesus wants us to take what we have, whatever it is, whatever is already here, and bless it: in other words, give it to God. And then break it open, divide it up, and give it away. Joyfully. So that all will have enough. Jesus does this with bread, every time he shares a meal. And he does this with his life: lives it for God, breaks it open, gives it to us. And this is what Jesus wants with our lives too: You give them something to eat. It is not enough to simply pray that God will change things, will feed the hungry and clothe the naked. God needs us to participate in this eucharistic action. God is calling us to take our lives, and bless them, and be broken open, and then given away in service of others. Take, bless, break, give. No matter how hard or impossible this seems, the end result is worth it: everyone ate until they were satisfied, and when they gathered up what was left over, they filled twelve baskets. This vision is possible. We already have what we need, right here in our midst. In this Eucharist, we are made one Body with the Lord, as we hear in today’s Second Reading. Let us resolve again, then, to live lives worthy of such a great calling. The Kingdom is waiting to be born. Will you join in this eucharist?
    1 point
  39. MIKolbe

    "Evil" TV Series

    Well.. it's Hollywood portraying Catholicism, so you lose points off the top. I don't think a seminarian would be doing this type of work. But, it does show Bishops as a bit disconnected and motivated by money/politic-ing, so I guess that might be a little accurate. I think it uses "parts" of the faith to add credibility to the storyline. And I think it uses those parts accurately enough to further the storyline and add credibility to it. For example, David the seminarian struggles with issues of purity and Leland has made it clear that he is very motivated to make sure David doesn't get ordained. Powerful, yet over-the-top, things happen when a lady receives communion, which showed how the devil/demons are repulsed with the Eucharist. Plus all the happenings when a rosary is touched by certain people and how evil is repulsed by it. What I like most is the show presents the topic of evil as subtle: the devil's biggest trick is to make you believe he doesn't exist. It shows how our battle with evil is real, and even coordinated by many ministers of darkness. It even shows the folly...the arrogance and stupidity of evil when that one kid, after being prepped by Leland for so long, accidently kills himself with the very weapon he was trained to use. I've been watching some episode reviews on YouTube of season 2. I haven't seen any of season 2 except for the premier. It is humorous, and a bit sad, that some of the people reviewing have no idea what some of the more "catholic" moments mean. Their explanations are....interesting to say the least. Not sure if that's what you were going for....
    1 point
  40. Sister Leticia

    Discerning a Carmelite Vocation

    A very, very normal state to be in! - not only now, but in the months ahead. Prayers for you, as you seek to discover how God wants you to respond to his love for you and our world.
    1 point
  41. PetiteFleur

    Discerning a Carmelite Vocation

    + Praised be Jesus Christ! This is my first time posting on Phatmass so here it goes! I'm currently waiting to hear back from the Carmel of St. Joseph in St. Agatha, Ontario about my application for aspirancy! If I'm accepted, I could be going for a live-in as soon as September. Please pray for me that God's will be done. Anyways, I've been discerning for a few years now and since I started discerning a vocation to Carmel, I have found the plethora of Phatmass threads so helpful. I'm so thankful for all those who have shared their experiences and knowledge, as it has been so helpful in my own discernment. If anyone has any advice or tips they would like to share, or if anyone knows more about this Carmel that would be fantastic. I have such a peace and joy but I'm also really nervous! Deo Gratias!
    1 point
  42. Luigi

    Renaming women “birthing people“

    1 point
  43. Peace

    Home Altar/Prayer Corner.

    I have a kneeler facing a wall and a crucifix on the wall above the kneeler. I’ve just got a copy of the psalms, a prayer book and a rosary on there. No idea what direction it’s facing, but hopefully whichever one that will keep me out of hell.
    1 point
  44. Ash Wednesday

    Home Altar/Prayer Corner.

    Our house is pretty small and has a weird English layout, so choice of direction to face isn't an option. I just have a little window area with an icon and some candles in my home office. I really enjoy seeing other people's own prayer corners though.
    1 point
  45. Didacus

    Australian pro-Gay Law

    It looks like another stepping stobe in cancel culture. It is not sufficient for non catholics to live their own lives free. They aim to remove any opposition to their point of view - even silencing an opposing voice is now dwemed insufficient... whatever point of view that differs from their own must be removed, eliminated and in no way tolerated or allowed to exist.
    1 point
  46. hakutaku

    Vaccine Efficacy

    This is not true. This is an outright lie. I can't wait to see your "data" from Quackistan.
    1 point
  47. little2add

    Renaming women “birthing people“

    You know what would be a good non binary name for a “birthing person” that is less Confusing and/or derogatory? PARENT like , if you agree
    1 point
  48. SicutColumba

    Urgent prayers please

    Thank you to everyone!!! Prayers answered at literally the last minute Thank you all
    1 point
  49. little2add

    Renaming women “birthing people“

    If you have a pronoun for a birthing person, then shouldn't you have a pronoun the pre-born baby. How about: "new yet-to-be born"? It sounds better than fetus and is non-binary too.
    1 point
  50. dUSt

    Renaming women “birthing people“

    I want my pronoun to be "your highness/his highness"
    1 point

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