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Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/22/2020 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    islandanchoress

    ICYMI - Sr Catherine's tips for isolation

    I have been alone in terms of family etc for literally decades. Also unable to work for as long as that. There were hard and desolate times. But we are adaptable and versatile beings. We can and do adapt to survive. Over the years loneliness eased as I adapted and solitude in very real terms became my preference. Now I live as an anchoress on a small offshore island that has few facilities. I have not been offisland for nearly 18 months and have no plans or needs to do that. My health issues are not life threatening unless I catch an infection so solitude means peace and health. As others have said the internet is a source of so much. As is handcrafting . I traded my knitting, hand made rosaries etc at craft fairs and street markets for many yeas before I got too old ( nearly 80 now) and still knit for sale etc. I am never lonely now; always alone. Also I have 6 cats, all rescues, whose adoration is a wonder! It is what you each decide to make of it. I mourned for years, and that was needed probably. But there is a time for mourning and a time to set tears aside and to pick up that precious thread of life again. And trust me on this, this next phase will be far richer and deeper in love than anything that has gonv before. It is saying YES PLEASE! With a full and willing heart. I AM HERE, LORD!
  2. 3 points
    underatree

    Former Nuns

    Leaving religious life was the hardest thing I have ever done, by far. My community had a number of significant problems, not least of which was that the novice mistress was highly controlling and manipulative. The wrong sort of expression on your face could lead to an hour’s scolding and questioning whether you were really in a state of grace and whether you had possibly committed some secret sin. She had/has serious anger/control issues and not having to deal with her is certainly one of the joys of secular life! I don’t have an interest in returning to my previous community (it’s been about five years since I left) but remain interested in religious life. I originally entered pretty young, swept up in all the vocations happytalk. Now I have a much better idea of what kind of spirituality/life/ministry fits me, and what kind of community I can live with.
  3. 2 points
    PhuturePriest

    Greetings, Plebs

    I have deigned to return. How is everyone? Are those from the old days still alive? Are you coping well with the whole Coronavirus thing? I am finishing out the last two months of my undergraduate days at the University of Dallas via online school and doing "off-site seminary formation" (whatever that means). I am currently drinking scotch out of a jam jar and watching Napoleon Dynamite for the first time. In other words, I am not coping well with the whole Coronavirus thing and am already getting quite bored with this "social distancing" affair. :| Do let me know if you're still alive. Or don't. I'll probably forget about this thread in the morning.
  4. 2 points
    Lilllabettt

    Consecrated Virgin vs. Consecrated Woman

    Can you expand on how the vocation of someone in a secular institute jives with the definition of consecrated life being a "public escatological sign"? Fr Scott says the document he mentions defines consecrated life that way and explicitly includes secular institutes in that definition. But, I thought the vocation of secular institutes was that their consecration is hidden? They are not outwardly set apart?
  5. 2 points
    underatree

    The Unknown Vocation: Secular Institutes

    I know a priest associated with this secular institute (Carmelite spirituality): http://www.notredamedevie.org/en/ I think it’s still mostly in French-speaking countries but he said they’ve been expanding over the past few years. I have a book by their founder, who was a Carmelite friar and who I think is now a Blessed. Very beautiful spirituality and life, certainly worth a look.
  6. 2 points
    OneHeart

    The Unknown Vocation: Secular Institutes

    I'm discerning secular institutes. I'm a secular Carmelite (fully professed OCDS) and when I entered, I thought that because there is an optional vow, that it was a consecration. I was totally excited because for circumstantial reasons I can't enter a community. I thought yay! God remberede and I have a vocation. I was so excited. But it's not consecration. But by the time I figured that out I was already way into formation so I decided to stay. I love Carmel,and half a loaf is better than none. But I want to give my whole self and be received. I explained to my President about my disappointment at not being able to be consecrated, but wasn't directed to Secular Institutes. I discerned religious life for a bit and am very drawn to it. I want to be consecrated to God alone. But community life isn't essential, and because of circumstances I have to stay "in the world". The circumstances are, I believe, the Lord's call on my life. So although I visited a community and really liked it, and they liked me, I've decided I have to stay in the world. Then I learned about Institutes just recently. And my SP had me draw up a rule of life for now, but it's private and I sense there is more. Then I heard about the Leaven last month!. I'm thinking about contacting them. I've always been drawn to St.Catherine of Sienna and I thought OCSD was like what she did. And St. Margaret of Cortona. Consecration --- like being a nun but on your own. I would like to wear a habit too but if God choses to hide me, then ok. I contacted the President or someone at the USA secular institutes but she hasn't responded to me. I'm interested in consecration with a carmelite contemplative charism. Are there others besides the Leaven? I'm in USA. I can afford travel. Prayer and penance. Silence and intercession. Union with God. Can I get more information? Jesus loves us!
  7. 2 points
    St. Elizabeth Ann

    Orders for people with celiac?

    I don't have Celiac's, I'm only gluten intolerant, so I may not be that much help. But all of the communities I've visited have been able to accommodate me (though contamination isn't a problem for me, so you will have to probably investigate more than I did on their preparation methods). The Poor Clares at the Bethlehem Monastary in Virginia, the Nashville Dominicans, and the Daughters of the Virgin Mother have all been able to feed me without me getting sick. I wish you the best and hope they can give you some more information!
  8. 1 point
    Luigi

    Covid-19

    Here's a message from the Trappist Abbot General. It provides insight into life in Rome, through the eyes of a cloistered monk, of course. It's a little long, but you can read it like a chatty letter from an old friend. ############################################################################## March 27, 2020 7:38 am THE GENERALATE AND CORONAVIRUS Dear Sisters and Brothers, Some of you have kindly expressed your interest and concern for us here at the Casa and how we are faring, living as we do in Italy, the present epicentre of the Coronavirus outbreak and its deadly consequences. I am glad to be able to say that all twelve of us in residence are well, as far as we know, though some are perhaps more anxious than others. Life goes on here as normal in terms of the monastic day and timetable, but the big difference is that we are all present in the house at the same time due to the restrictions introduced two weeks ago by the government in a decree aptly entitled “I stay at home!” And so we do! We don’t have a choice: exits are allowed for real necessities (food and medicine), for essential work, and for particular personal reasons. Checks are made by the police and one needs to carry an official document justifying one’s reason for one’s journey. Our cellarer, Brother Javier, who gets our provisions once a week, was stopped at police check points both going and returning from a recent shopping trip. So enforcement of the restrictions is being taken more and more seriously. I can see this just from looking out my window and seeing that the car park in the square is completely empty. Normally, on working days, it is packed tight with about 150-200 cars. Now there is not a car to be seen. Every day is like a Sunday! The goal is, of course, to reduce human contact and the risk of passing on the virus. The universities are closed, and so our two students (Fathers Maxi and Antonio from Rawaseneng) are working from home while the Abbot General and his Councillors are grounded! But we have plenty with which to usefully occupy ourselves. In this country the epicentre of the Coronavirus is Northern Italy and, in particular, the region of Lombardy, which is about a 5-6 hours’ drive from us here in Rome. Living for the past few weeks with blue skies and sunshine beaming in the window, it seems strange to hear of the havoc that Coronavirus is wreaking just a few hours up the road. The number of deaths per day in Italy is around 600-700, and most of these are in the North. We hear of the heroic, round-the-clock work of doctors, nurses, hospital workers, clergy, religious, the civil authorities, and even the Army as they give themselves (and, in a number of cases, their lives—33 doctors have died) in the service of the afflicted. One feels small in the face of such self-sacrifice, compassion and solidarity. Three cheers for humanity! Some days ago a few of us saw a brief video clip that had to do with the city of Bergamo (birthplace of Pope Saint John XXIII). In it we saw 15 large Army trucks full of coffins taking away the dead after nightfall to other towns and provinces, because neither the cemeteries nor crematoria of Bergamo could cope with the numbers of the deceased! It was a macabre reminder of the extent of the loss of life as well as of the struggle of those fighting the virus and the suffering of the bereaved, separated from their loved ones in their suffering and in their death. Coronavirus has broken in on our world and disturbed the plans of rulers and of nations, and also of our own small monastic world, in a way which no one was prepared for. Our agendas for meetings, visitations, travel plans, even hospital visits, community projects or just daily community life have all been derailed. Many of us are perhaps experiencing enclosure in a way that was known only to those who lived in the monastery thirty or forty years ago! We have been pushed out of our comfort zone and called to realise in another way the fragility of our lives and how little control we have over them. We have a new terminology now: we speak of “social distancing” to refer to keeping a safe distance from each other to avoid passing on or contracting Coronavirus! We can see the struggle among the nations of the world, the struggle to protect our own land and at the same time the desire to collaborate with others. We close our borders and at the same time we need each other. We want to find a cure and we work with others, and yet we want it for ourselves first—if we can get away with it. We live in a situation of crisis and a defining moment for humanity. We need God’s help. And we also need to encourage one another, as St. Paul says. The Italians, at least in some popular quarters, do some of that by singing and making music from their balconies and so lifting their spirits. A little bit of that has happened at the Casa too. We noted here that on Sunday afternoon, March 15, Pope Francis made a short “pilgrimage” to the Icon of Our Lady Salvation of the Roman People at the Basilica of Saint Mary Major, and he then went on to visit the miraculous cross in the Church of St. Marcellus, also in Rome. This cross was carried through the City in 1522 to end the great plague. Pope Francis went there to pray for an end to this pandemic, for healing for the sick, for lasting peace for the dead and the comforting of the bereaved. He encouraged the use of the prayer he recited on this occasion for our present circumstances. Living in Rome as we are, we here at the Casa have taken to saying the attached prayer together after Vespers and then spending some moments in silence. We find it good to do this and we trust that it does good. So now you have a little window into our present life at the Casa. Thank you for your concern. Let us entrust ourselves with confidence into God’s hands and pray together for the wellbeing of all, and especially for an end to the Coronavirus pandemic and for the healing of the ills it has brought to the lives of so many. With our fraternal prayers and good wishes, On the solemnity of the Annunciation of the Lord, March 25, 2020. Eamon Fitzgerald Abbot General
  9. 1 point
    Seven77

    List of Catholic Streaming and Online Resources (Masses, Prayers, Devotions, Retreats)

    Fam, it's vital that we keep up with the practice of our faith every day no matter what. Watch the Holy Mass– – this should be obvious of course – – but also watch the Daily Mass as well if you were going in person before the pandemic went down. Also, it's good to know that other prayers and the Divine Office, retreats and talks, live stream Adoration, etc. are also being made available at this time. how amesome is it that all this technology is in place for such a time of crisis such as this? Yes, it isn't the same – – but it's something. Join in praying for a massive renewal of faith that will continue after this is all over. Here is a list that is being expanded – – if you know of something that should be added, please go to the link at the top of the sheet and please add it: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1-vM8zgUcYra0_c8lIpsYtSAGfEkFzJ_k1dUqSB0u1yw/edit#gid=0 are there any other lists like this out there?
  10. 1 point
    Sister Leticia

    ICYMI - Sr Catherine's tips for isolation

    You may well have seen this already - a cloistered Dominican shares some tips for those who have to isolate due to Coronavirus. And if I'm not mistaken, she used to be a regular and valued part of this family? https://www.nj.com/opinion/2020/03/im-a-nun-and-ive-been-social-distancing-for-29-years-here-are-tips-for-staying-home-amid-coronavirus-fears.html Hoping you are all well, and in good spirits. I realise some of you might be facing the disappointment of cancelled Come & See weekends or longer visits, or other vocation-related plans might seem to be falling apart thanks to this unprecedented emergency. Let us hold each other, and all our loved ones, in prayer.
  11. 1 point
    cappie

    FIFTH SUNDAY OF LENT A

    Two of my favourite sayings are, "You're not dead till you're dead," and, "Think outside the box; you'll have eternity to be inside the box." This Sunday's readings focus on graves, the depths and death, but they really are about life. For the Fifth Sunday in Lent St John recounts another sign, or miracle, the raising of Lazarus. It is this story that precipitates the plot against Jesus life and leads to his death and resurrection. It is a sign story revealing that Jesus acts, not on his own, but from above and not at the urging of others. It is another account of life coming from God and no one else. Jesus is told that his friend Lazarus in Bethany is ill. But Jesus does not go there for two more days and not until after the disciples remind him that Bethany is the place where the people wanted to stone him just a short time ago. Jesus takes the opportunity to tell the disciples that he will go there so that they might believe. He is the prophet in this story, and it is up to him to bring God’s message of life. As Jesus approaches Bethany, Martha, one of the sisters of Lazarus, meets Jesus and tells him he is too late, that Lazarus is dead. Jesus tells her that her brother Lazarus will live again because he, Jesus, is the resurrection and the life. Those who believe, even if they die, will live, and everyone who lives and believes in me will never die. Jesus is visibly disturbed in spirit and deeply moved. When Jesus asks where Lazarus has been laid, Martha says, “Come and see”. Jesus begins to weep. Is he aware that the same things will happen again only to him in just a short time? Martha sends for her sister, Mary, the sister who anointed Jesus with perfume and wiped his feet with her hair and asks her to come join them. The other mourners follow her because they think that she is going to the tomb to mourn. The tomb is described as a cave with a large stone in front of it. Jesus asks them to roll way the stone. Then he looks upward and thanks his Father for always hearing him. He calls into the cave and with a loud voice tells Lazarus to come out. Lazarus does come out proving once again that only God gives life. As a part of our Lenten journey we are given yet another opportunity to walk a path toward restoration with Jesus. But we must walk that path as a community so that there may be a resurrection into new life. We are reminded that only God gives life. These stories give us hope that God will continue to give life even over death. We must choose to despair or to trust; to give up or to go on; to abandon hope, or to let go in faith. That choice is not made for us, but it is offered to us. And that choice can be terribly hard. More than at any other time, the reality of death—death in whatever form—is a call to trust. We see what the world sees, and yet we see more. And we see that the word of Jesus has power. “Come out” the Lord calls. “Come out” into different life, into new life. “Come out” into life unknown and unexplained. “Come out” in trust and in hope. We are living in a time, that points us towards Pentecost; but first we must experience Easter. We can make choices about how we get to Easter. We can choose not to focus on the things of the world that distract us and drain our life from us. We can choose to resist loving or accepting some more than others because they are different or think differently. We can choose to nurture a sense that we are together, a family.
  12. 1 point
    OneHeart

    Consecrated Virgin vs. Consecrated Woman

    I'm really trying to understand all this. I think the Lord wants me consecrated. But what does that mean. I'm a third order secular Carmelite, and there is an optional vow I could take. But I've been told very clearly that that does not constitute consecration. So I'm looking elsewhere So members of secular institutes have the same consecration as religious? Are their vows public? In other words, is it a "terminal" state? That is probably a bad term to use for what I am trying to ask. I'm meaning that in the sense of a "terminal degree" like a PhD. Is it the end of the line. I've learned that the OCDS is not a complete vocation. So I'm trying to understand all this. What is the difference between living public vows, and being consecrated? Thanks,
  13. 1 point
    GraceUk

    The Unknown Vocation: Secular Institutes

    Thanks very much for explaining Faustina. I think it's good we are finding out more about these various groups. I had heard of Caritas Christi but didn't know what they did. I've never heard of the Leven only the third order Carmelites.So I've done a bit of reading. I hope everyone is well in those difficult times.
  14. 1 point
    Nunsuch

    NEW: Apostolic Thumb Blog...

    @Lea, yes, that is the international one. They are lovely women.
  15. 1 point
    Faustina86

    Consecrated Virgin vs. Consecrated Woman

    Gloriana35, I personally never understood this either (having to keep their vows secret). My secular institute was one of those that were very secretive and kept their membership secret. My understanding of not being overly bold about our consecration is to fit in with all Christians And non-Christians to be an example of holiness and how it’s attainable for all. But in recent years as far as I know sharing your vocation a consecrated secular is optional. We are allowed to share if we want to and if we want to keep it secret we can do that as well. In my community in certain countries secular institute members have to have very public consecrations in regards to the culture because they’re neither entering a religious life or getting married. Because of the need to make the vocation more known we are having to step more into light Otherwise some might not know they have a vocation to this particular form of consecrated life. I come across so many priests that are clueless of the vocation.
  16. 1 point
    Nunsuch

    An inspiring story

    This was published in the New York Times, and tells about how the Sisters in Philadelphia, USA, responded to the horrible influenza epidemic of 1918. May we remember these foremothers now. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/20/opinion/coronavirus-nuns.html
  17. 1 point
    little2add

    Laughter is good medicine.....

  18. 1 point
    islandanchoress

    Covid-19

    In Ireland here. On a small offshore island.. I am both old ( nearly 80) and with serious health issues so in fact have been living isolation for several years; also my calling is as my username says. It needs accustoming to develop the balance you need and trust me that using the internet makes is many times easier. If you realise that then there will be no " mental health issues". We are created to be adaptable and versatile. When I was a child and later in life we needed not to think in terms of exercise as we walked everywhere, gardened, ie occupational exercise. A brisk walk is excellent. Spring cleaning.... Just now the anxiety and uncertainty are the damaging elements, waking each day to shocking new stats. the uncertainty. Not just the practicalities and uncertainties re jobs and income. Exercise will help that too; get out into the air. Listen to the birdsong, look for flowers and leaves.Out here on the small island I go out in the small hours, like the anchoresses of old, when there is deep peace and silence. Someone mentioned mass in an empty church with a "lonely priest"? Jesus is with every priest at every mass. Come on now! We in Ireland have been and are livestreaming mass widely. I cannot attend so choose a different online mass week by week even before covid. Look at and for the positive in this hard situation. We have wonderful responses from far flung communities who are rallying to support and provide eg shopping etc for those of us living alone and unable to get out and with the increasing restrictions. See if there is help needed locally?
  19. 1 point
    Faustina86

    The Unknown Vocation: Secular Institutes

    I have read something like this before maybe even from this site anyways thanks for sharing. ☺️
  20. 1 point
    cappie

    THE ANNUNCIATION OF THE LORD TO THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY

    The Annunciation is a significant feast day within the Anglican, Catholic and Orthodox traditions. You may be surprised to learn that even the Qu “ran records the Annunciation, although the focus is a little different. The Angelus has traditionally been rung early in the morning; at noon, and at evening. In former times when watches and clocks were not omnipresent, the sound of the Angelus bell would have provided a very useful marker, dividing the periods of an ordinary day. However, the Angelus has a far greater significance than simply dividing the day, and of course it always did. In the Angelus we celebrate the faith of the Blessed Virgin Mary. In the first century Jewish world Mary or ‘Maryam’ was the most common or ordinary name imaginable. The name simply means ‘one who wished for a child’. For an ordinary Jewish girl, this was a very ordinary ambition in life. But they do say, be careful what you wish for. In Luke Chapter 1, Mary’s ordinary wish is being granted, albeit in the most extraordinary way imaginable. But even more extraordinary than the angels unexpected message is Marys response to it. After a very human and humble question along the lines of „are you sure?‟, Mary utters those extraordinary words, „Here I am, the servant of the Lord; let it be with me according to your word From all eternity, God knew who the Mother of his Incarnate Son would be. From all eternity, he chose her and fashioned her. But the Incarnation depended on her consent. Mary did not understand how she could become the mother of the Messiah; apparently, she had some promise of virginity, even though she was betrothed to Joseph. Not knowing how, nevertheless she said, I am the handmaid of the Lord; let it be done to me as you say. At that instant, the Word was made flesh. God became man in her womb. But there is more. In Ephesians and Colossians, St. Paul tells us that God chose us in Christ to be his holy and beloved adopted children before the world was made. Now if he chose us in Christ from eternity, that is before sin occurred. This indicates that the Word would have become flesh even if there had never been sin: For God chose us in Christ before the fact of sin. He chose us in his Incarnate Son. Jesus Christ, the Incarnate Word, is therefore the model of all creation as well as the cause of redemption. But Christ-in-the-flesh could not be the model of creation unless.... unless the same Virgin Mary consented! Mary is, to be sure, our model for acceptance and invitation to faithfully respond to the word of God in our lives. Mary’s discerning response to Gabriel’s announcement models for us our acceptance of God’s invitations in our own unique circumstances. Let us thank Mary today for her unconditional ‘Yes’ and let us ask her to help us to say our ‘Yes’ to God, today and for the rest of our lives.
  21. 1 point
    BarbaraTherese

    The Unknown Vocation: Secular Institutes

    Yes. I was speaking about a private vow or vows - not connected in any way to secular institutes, although the dedicated single life is also a vocation in The Church. I must underscore that this thread is about secular institutes and a great honour in The Church. Since private vows has come up, I just would like to round things off if I can. I think we need to remember that nothing whatsoever on any level is higher nor better, more perfect, than God's Will - some might find they are called by God to nursing for example or perhaps to the military, even accounting as another example - any role in life in fact...........no vow public or private, consecration nor dedication involved. Such a vocational call and God's Will for a person is still a vocation (vocare - to call) by virtue of God's Will calling and taken up. The person is committed (and foundational to vocation per se) discerning it is God's Will for him or her and discernment at any level is always prudently and wisely done with spiritual direction. Pope Benedict recommends that spiritual direction is for anyone "who wants to live their baptism responsibly" https://spiritualdirection.com/2011/05/19/pope-benedict-recommends-spiritual-direction-to-everyone Absolutely no one does not have a personal vocation at any time in their life, while we all have the general call to holiness. A personal vocation is in what manner or path God is calling one to achieve holiness. Formal vocations in The Church with consecration solely to God by The Church are where public vows are concerned, or Holy Orders for priests and deacons. Marriage for the married. There is also the eremitical life under Canon 603 and the Consecrated Virgin. These are all public consecrations by The Church. A committed single life in The Church as discerned as God's Will is a self dedication to God's Will with nothing formal/public within The Church. Dedicated singles are in the world for the world as are members of secular institutes. Consecrated vocations etc by The Church are taken out of the world for the world. even if they are living in the world. Any vow or promise, dedication, to God must be fulfilled under the virtue of Religion. We must remember that we are promising, vowing or whatever before God! For that reason, it is an extremely important to know what one is doing and why. Vocation is a call to to build on our baptism. Private vows and dedication is more easily dispensed than those under some form of public consecration. But to take up the private vows or dedication because it is easily dispensed is certainly a most imperfect motivation - full commitment too is lacking. And commitment to whatever is the foundation of vocation per se. Motivation however for any vocation can be purified as the journey goes on. But it is a sin of presumption to presume that that will occur. It is a different matter to hope it will occur and this is one area only where spiritual direction comes in. With private vows, the terms of obedience under the private vow of obedience can be spelt out in one's rule of life even with "t's crossed"and "i's dotted", as can the private vows of poverty and chastity. My mind boggles that God's Will should fall upon me or anyone for any reason whatsoever. It is the highest action and act of God (with any content whatsoever) on earth to, for and with His creatures who are but dust and we all will return to dust. The Will of God, God The Almighty, is totally humbling and amesome, stunning, sensational and bewitching. God's Will as The Ultimate Perfection - By St Alphonsus Liguori https://www.catholicbible101.com/godswillourwill.htm . To study the theology of God's Will is astonishing, humbling - and more than well worth the effort. Please return to the subject of secular institutes and please do be forgiving that I have diverted from it somewhat.
  22. 1 point
    Luigi

    Covid-19

    St. Roch (San Rocco in Italian and San Roque in Spanish) was a French nobleman. He donated his money to the poor, and when the plague erupted, he ministered to the sick. When he contracted the plague himself, he went away into the woods to die alone, so as not to infect others - social distancing even in the Middle Ages! But a dog brought him bread daily, and Roch recovered from the plague. He is now considered a patron of the sick and of dogs. (I grew up in St. Roch's parish, so I've known about him all my life. He's often depicted with his gown raised, to show a plague wound on his leg, and with a dog by his side.) His feast day is August 16th. Here is the traditional Prayer to St. Roch, which I suggest we pray for Covid-19 patients: O Blessed Saint Roch, Patron of the sick, Have pity on those Who lie upon a bed of suffering. Your power was so great When you were in this world, That by the sign of the Cross, Many were healed of their diseases. Now that you are in heaven, Your power is not less. Offer, then, to God Our sighs and tears And obtain for us that health we seek Through Christ our Lord. Amen.
  23. 1 point
    Luigi

    2020 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    From Mount Angel Benedictine Abbey in Oregon: Mount Angel Abbey & Seminary March 21 at 6:49 PM · Please join us in welcoming our five new brother postulants: Jason, Travis, Estevan, Horacio, and Valentin. According to our monastic tradition, these men were received into the postulancy in a simple ceremony on the eve of the Feast of the Transitus of St. Benedict. We praise God for his mercy and kindness, and for the courageous generosity of these men to answer God’s call joyfully even in this difficult time. mountangelabbey.org/monastery
  24. 1 point
    Faustina86

    The Unknown Vocation: Secular Institutes

    Hi undertree, Thanks for sharing! I have actually heard of that secular Institute. I love to learn about other religious communities and secular institutes so I can better share information with other discerners. As I am already a part of a secular institute myself. But this will be helpful for anyone interested in Carmelite secular institutes. There is a book called “Single For a Greater Purpose” and it talks about dedicated singleness which is not a form of consecrated life but it is a vocation in the church. Which the book references some religious orders and secular institutes which the book mentions in passing my community Notre Dame De vie and the Schoenstatt Movement. I think the book is writing about what is BarbaraTherese was talking about a form of a private vow for anyone interested in learning more about it.
  25. 1 point
    BarbaraTherese

    The Unknown Vocation: Secular Institutes

    I am in Australia, so not much help to you. And as I said before, our diocesan website has nothing at all about vocations as it did in the old website. That I am aware of only, some secular institutes do have a consecration (public vows) rather than a self dedication in a private vow. The following quotation comes from Fr. Hardon who is now deceased. He was a highly respected Cathollic author. His biography is HERE Re the above fourth category, I do not know if it is still being considered or not. At this point in time and for some years now, there is lot of focus on the scandals in The Church and what is the path ahead. I am under private vows and hold that it is not the consecration in religious life so much that makes for holiness, it is living out the three vows and God's Will within religious life. I have made private vows of the evangelical counsel - must be forty years ago now. My priest religious SD asked the Archbishop if I could have a Home Mass for the renewing of the vows. The Archbishop agreed. The Archbishop did comment "This is a good way to do it", whatever that might mean. That Mass was overwhelmingly humbling and emotional for me and I felt then and it continues up to today that I have given my whole self and life to Jesus. ONe does not make a public consecration nor private vows and that is it, it is the title of the first chapter in a journey that will be lifelong. Discernment and living out one's vows will be lifelong. But my awareness at that Home Mass might be a private reaction and conviction - not necessarily for all. I would not know. Private vows for me has a particular aspect not available in religious life to my knowledge. There is no recognition, respect nor big celebrations at milestones in one's journey, no habit, no religious rituals. The private commitment for life is for Jesus alone and in a human sense it has no human type reward. That is not to state that those in religious life do not live the life for Him and only Him. I think many probably do. I hope you will find what you are seeking and you will if you remain open to what God Wills, not on what you want. The two are not necessarily compatible and I found that out in my many years of living the lifestyle I do - and my long journey of discernment which continues each day in discerning God's Will and in the renewing daily of commitment, come what may. I also had to write my own rule of life. God's Blessings on your journey.
  26. 1 point
    Faustina86

    The Unknown Vocation: Secular Institutes

    Hi OneHeart, What an interesting and inspiring journey you have been on so far in discerning your vocation. I went through a similar discernment with the Secular Carmelites and was curious about the vow aspect myself but discerned out when I was an aspirant because I still felt called to Consecrated Life. At the same time I came across my community Caritas Christi Secular Institute of Pontifical Right and started discerning with them. I went through a nine month preparation formation, I applied found out 2 months later I was accepted and then was officially received into the community November 1, 2018. Next year around this time I will be asking to take my first dedication/vows. So I am still experiencing my journey and discernment. One of the things I want to share about my community is that because we aren’t tied to a particular spirituality we can pray in whatever Catholic spirituality we feel called to. So even though we are not a Carmelite order you could still be a third order Carmelite and take vows in Caritas Christi our constitutions would not conflict with your way of life as a secular Carmelite . One of our members is actually a Benedictine Oblate. So if you would like to know more about my particular secular Institute here is our website. https://ccinfo.org Here is the directory of the secular institutes in the USA I’m not sure where you’re from. But if you’re curious about learning more about a particular secular institute I would suggest you contact them directly. https://secularinstitutes.org/institute-directory/ if you have any specific questions I’d be happy to answer them if I’m able to
  27. 1 point
    dUSt

    Streaming Mass During the COVID-19 Quarantine

    I added Bishop Barron's daily mass to the phatmass homepage: http://www.phatmass.com Anybody else have any other favorite streaming daily/Sunday mass sources?
  28. 1 point
    Seven77

    Greetings, Plebs

    Of course I am alive. What did you think?
  29. 1 point
    Antigonos

    ICYMI - Sr Catherine's tips for isolation

    The internet has been a big help during this period. Not only because of the many varied forums I am a member of, but because YouTube has a plethora of short films on just about every subject one can imagine. [There's a live webcam stream from the grotto at Lourdes, BTW]
  30. 1 point
    BarbaraTherese

    We've Got FRESH SPAM in the House!

    Laughter really does help.
  31. 1 point
    Luigi

    2020 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    From Newark Benedictine Abbey in Newark, NJ: Br. Simon Peter and Br. Asiel Maria to Make Solemn Vows Saturday March 21st Mar 19 2020 On Saturday, March 21, 2020, The Solemnity of the Passing of Our Holy Father Saint Benedict, Br. Simon Peter Clayton, O.S.B. and Br. Asiel Maria Rodriguez, O.S.B. will profess Solemn Vows before Abbot Melvin Valvano, O.S.B. and the monastic community of the Benedictine Abbey of Newark. In the midst of the Corona Virus Pandemic, the Liturgy will be closed to the public, but we invite you to join us in spiritual communion and via Live Stream of the Rite of Solemn Profession this Saturday at 10:30 AM from the Abbey Church. Rejoice with us as these young men say yes to God and make their life-long commitment to the monastic way of life here in the city of Newark!
  32. 1 point
    Lilllabettt

    Cutting out the negative

    Cutting off a brother is like cutting off an arm. You need your arm. And yet, if it is killing you - it has to go. Personally I like the boundaries made possible by using a telephone with toxic family. I don't take their call, I initiate it on my terms. And when my boundaries are crossed I hang up. Your mileage may vary... but thanks to the phone I havent needed to go no contact. The physical distance I have with them helps too.
  33. 1 point
    awesomequotes

    Credibility quote

    The most essential quality for leadership is not perfection but credibility. People must be able to trust you. Rick Warren
  34. 1 point
    little2add

    Impeach abortion

  35. 1 point
    DameAgnes

    Slideshow: Sr. Lucia Maria's 1st Profession OP

    https://aleteia.org/2020/03/20/exclusive-photos-a-triumph-of-faith-and-love-in-the-face-of-the-coronavirus-pandemic/
  36. 1 point
    Pax17

    ICYMI - Sr Catherine's tips for isolation

    Thank you, Sister. Sister MC was the vocation director for the Dominicans in Summit, NJ for about 12 years, and a great source of info for everyone here on VS. Prayers for you and your community.
  37. 1 point
    little2add

    Covid-19

    today's Sunday mass prayer
  38. 1 point
    This worked out really well!! When I subsribed yesterday night there were around 500 subscibers, now they are close to 1500!
  39. 1 point
    Vin

    Secular Movies that portray Catholicism well?

    On the Waterfront the Exorcist https://lydwinejournal.org/features/joseph/there-is-only-one Calvary I Confess
  40. 0 points
    Luigi

    Laughter is good medicine.....

  41. 0 points
    Lilllabettt

    Greetings, Plebs

    Hello fetus. How much hair do you have now? ... face doesn't count. Amazing that you were a Napoleon Dynamite virgin... you deprived child. I am not coping well. I had a blood test that says I might have lupus. My doctor then decided not to see any patients until after the pandemic. So now I just sit and think "I might have lupus." Fun.

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