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    little2add

    Chummy Commoner


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    Nunsuch

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  3. dUSt

    dUSt

    The System


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    fides' Jack

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/24/2021 in all areas

  1. SicutColumba

    Urgent prayers please

    If you could please spare a Hail Mary for a very urgent intention I would be so grateful. Thank you all.
    11 points
  2. So...let me ask you a question. If you are a Roman Catholic (as evidenced by your vocation search in RC orders) why would you even think about walking away and joining a Protestant denomination? Is it just to become a vicar? Is it to have a title? Are you trying to prove something? It shouldn't always be about "me", but about how best to have a servant's heart while utilizing your gifts, talents, and abilities in a vocation that is mutually discerned. Perhaps you were told you didn't have a vocation to a particular order for a very good reason even if you didn't agree with the assessment. Yes, we all have vocations, just not all of us are called to religious life even if we think we are. And orders have age limits for very good reasons. Do you have a spiritual director? If not, I would encourage you to find one. As a SD myself, I would strongly encourage you to take a "deep dive" into your motivation for desiring religious life. Also, orders are not looking for large bank accounts or other monies you could bring. Rather, they are looking for riches of the heart, for a teachable spirit, etc. It's not merely about what you think you can " bring" to an order. Protestants have problems/rules/limitations just like RC's, or any other denomination for that matter. You can't just walk into a Protestant seminary if you are a Catholic, expect to be accepted, and then graduate and be ordained. Real life doesn't work that way. There are many steps that must be taken including converting to a Protestant denomination (not a short process), graduating with an undergrduate/graduate degree with the proper pre-Seminary courses, being accepted in the Seminary after going through many hoops including a psychological evaluation, etc. It's not a 1-2-3 process. And if you do get through all of this, you are not placed in a congregation. Rather, you must be "called" by a particular church. It doesn't work like Diocesan priesthood. Step back, take a deep breath, see a good spiritual director who can help you discern your true vocation.
    10 points
  3. catholicamama

    2021 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    9 new Postulants entered The Dominican Sisters of Mary Mother of the Eucharist today including my daughter ❤️
    10 points
  4. MIKolbe

    2022 Entrances, Vows and Ordinations

    On March 3, I will be formally installed into the Ministry of Acolyte in the Diocese of Pittsburgh. I hope, God willing, to be ordained as a Permanent Deacon on Oct 1 of this year as well. There are 18 of 'us' in the class of 22, one of which is Maronite (we are unsure of his ordination date). Please pray for our families, those charged with our formation, and for us. Thank you!
    9 points
  5. Feankie

    Am I called to be a nun

    Although I don't post much as of late, I have to chime in on this one. My feeling is this thread is drifting (actually, it is already there) into an area in which I doubt any of us have expertise. This is more than "Am I called to be a nun?" Is this question a symptom of psychological issues or is a "desire" to be associated with the particular congregation an "acting out" of OCD and other issues? The originator of the thread has admitted she has OCD, trouble with anxiety, and a disbelief/distrust of what was told to her by the nuns she briefly visited. She has admitted no attraction to the LOTH, boredom with other monastic practices, etc. , And a desire not to be cured of her OCD raises the red flags very high. I don't think any of us, in the goodness of our hearts and our desire to help a soul in distress, is equipped to give her the advice and help she really needs. Rather, a frank and open conversation with a good mental health professional seems to be the logical next step in light of the comments she's made about her OCD and other issues. Take a minute and think.....are all the well-meaning comments/suggestions helping or hurting the situation? Or are they feeding into her self-admitted issues? Please be very careful here.
    9 points
  6. dUSt

    Please pray for my son, Ezra

    Thank you for the prayers! He has a brain bruise with bleeding but it should be able to heal without surgery. Thanks for keeping him in your prayers.
    8 points
  7. Sponsa-Christi

    Brooklyn Carmel

    Obviously I'm not a part of this community, was not privy to their discernment process, and respect the fact that communities need to do what they discern is right for them. Still, I think it's a little sad that they're moving out of inner city Brooklyn. It seems like an area like this, where there is so much sin occurring, is exactly the sort of place that most needs a powerhouse of prayer like Carmel.
    8 points
  8. Seven77

    Missing Old Phatmass Members

    taking it back to 2003. I was in the hospital for a tracheostomy that took me by surprise because I stopped breathing one afternoon – – I say it took me by surprise because I was unprepared for it even though it is a consequence of the natural progression of muscular dystrophy which I have. Anyway, that was 2006. My sister posted here asking for prayers and so many members here wrote messages to me – – I will never forget it, and apparently neither will my dad because he randomly reminded me of it today. True story.
    7 points
  9. dUSt

    Changed setting to reduce SPAM

    OK, I changed a setting to help reduce SPAM posts. Now, any post that is reported as spam using the "report" option (under the little ellipsis in the upper right corner of each post) will be automatically hidden if the author is a noob with less than 10 posts. Hopefully, this will help keep the phorum clean without having to wait for moderators. Thanks. Love you. Bye.
    7 points
  10. Feankie

    Religious Names

    For the love of God......please quit the sniping! It's getting old. Actually it got old a long time ago! We are each entitled to our own opinion/s. Others may agree, but then again, they may not. But it's gotten to the point where you can't tell if someone is being snarky or just trying to be "funny" in an oblique kind of way when they comment on a post they don't like or agree with. Please respect the posts of others on this forum and not get your undies in a knot. Life is too short for petty or snarky comments.
    7 points
  11. Sponsa-Christi

    2021 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    I'm definitely not against young vocations (I first felt a call to be a bride of Christ when I was twelve, and I made my permanent life commitment as a consecrated virgin when I was only twenty-three). But I would tend to err on the side of "a real vocation won't be stolen." I do think it is entirely possible to lose a vocation due to one's own fault. But I think this would be more like a situation where a young woman tells God: "I'll start discerning seriously in ten or fifteen years, after I've had time to travel, have career, and have fun!" versus: "My parents want me to finish college, so I'll delay my entrance for another year or two while still keeping in touch with the Sisters." And I think there could be (relatively rare) times for an SD to appropriately tell someone: "Stop going on multiple retreats, you should take the plunge and just enter somewhere before you age out"...but I don't think this advice should ever be given to women under age 30-ish. Very young discerners who are pious and well-intentioned are actually quite vulnerable, specifically because they are so pious and well-intentioned! Statements along the lines of "enter now, or you'll lose your vocation" are, for this age group, often more like high-pressure sales tactics than salutary reality checks. I also think too much emphasis on making a vocational choice right away can also convey a wrong impression of what a deep relationship with God is really like. God is a loving and gentle friend who open to a patient on-going conversation with a young person about her future; and One who will still love her just as much even if she makes the "wrong" choice about her vocation or maybe takes a little longer than she would have expected. He's not an arbitrary, authoritarian boss who demands: "Make the right choice NOW, or I'll make sure you lose out forever!" I know those who argue for purposeful discernment at a young age aren't intending to convey a wrong impression of what God is like, but this is a phenomenon that can happen. I've heard so many stories of young women who were encouraged to "take the leap" and enter right away, but then it turned out that their community really wasn't the right fit for them (even where many other communities might have been), and then they struggle for years afterwards with thoughts of being unwanted by God because they left the community. I think a lot of this pain can be prevented by approaches to discernment that are less "radical" and more grounded in the concept of an on-going relationship with God.
    7 points
  12. Antigonos

    Am I called to be a nun

    I'd like to make an observation here, partly as a nurse, and partly just having lived 75 years. I'm not implying anything personal to any particular person. During the time I've been in this forum, I've noticed a number of times that persons with varying forms of mental issues have seemed to give the impression that they think going into religious life will "cure" them of their particular problem. In fact, religious life in community can exacerbate them. One needs to be exceptionally healthy in body and mind to flourish in the hothouse of a small, intense community. I think Sister Leticia's question, what God is calling a person to be, is an excellent one. There are many ways in which one can live a richly spiritual life while also giving of oneself to benefit others -- it does not have to be behind convent walls, IMO.
    7 points
  13. Sister Leticia

    Am I called to be a nun

    This thread is headed by a question: am I called to be a nun? It's a closed question, ie one which can only be answered Yes or No. And I suspect this is the question you keep asking yourself, and wanting the answer to be No - except when you wanted it to be Yes. May I suggest you start asking a different, more open question: WHAT is God calling me to be? This means you will take the focus away from one, specific vocation, and your anxiety about it - and open up many more possibilities. This is also much more the attitude with which anyone should begin a discernment - the narrowing of options will come later.
    7 points
  14. Carla

    Nice article on New Poor Clare Novice in Roswell

    Carla older sister is here.I can confirm that Sr. Michaela is still in her order very happy and full of god's grace.In June it will be 7 years since her entrance and in September it will be 6 years since her first vows.She is patiently wait her final vows and as i know she keep you all in her prayers.I miss her as much as our whole family, but the most important thing for us is that she is happy, even though we see her quite rarely.
    6 points
  15. I keep reading the thread title as "aromatic" rather than "aromantic". I wonder if maybe I'm coming down with COVID, which affects the sense of smell, I'm told? Just a joke, folks!
    6 points
  16. cruciatacara

    Missing Old Phatmass Members

    I am a friend of hers. She is doing well and yes, is in religious life. I will let her know that you were thinking of her and enjoyed her old posts.
    6 points
  17. AVEBVM

    2021 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    I’m entering the Order of Discalced Carmelites on October 7, 2021.
    6 points
  18. dUSt

    Home Altar/Prayer Corner.

    Here’s my prayer room. It used to be the phatmass sound booth back when we recorded music. It does face East, mostly by chance.
    6 points
  19. benedictaaugustine

    My Sacred Artwork - Thoughts?

    I thought I’d share my artwork here, I’ve been painting these for about a year and half now! I once went viral on Tiktok for these and people went insane arguing about Jesus in particular lol. But I love the art I do but I’m starting to dry out of ideas… I’m working on St Joseph right now, but any saint suggestions? Here’s a link to the rest of my pics: https://www.magnificatprints.com/shop
    5 points
  20. Seven77

    Roe v Wade may be overturned?

    Prayers and more prayers! Nothing we go through is ever wasted! Join me in offering sufferings and setbacks especially for this cause! by the way, did you all know that today's the feast day of Cardinal John O'Connor? He was the Cardinal Archbishop of New York and the founder of the Sisters of Life, which he instituted as a witness to the dignity of human life as a gift from God... the news of this day is definitely not coming as coincidence…
    5 points
  21. dUSt

    Roe v Wade may be overturned?

    I remember so many people were against voting for Trump arguing that Roe vs Wade would never be overturned no matter what Trump did. Despite all the bad, this is some good that might come from it. We'll see.
    5 points
  22. dUSt

    Roe v Wade may be overturned?

    If the abortion issue is returned to the states then it’s back into the hands of voters. Next step would be to establish personhood to the unborn so they have the same rights as the rest of us.
    5 points
  23. little2add

    The evolution of the Phatmass Phorum, from 2001 and on...

    thank you, dUSt your website is a blessing in this cruel world we call earth!
    5 points
  24. truthfinder

    Little boys playing with "girl" toys

    In certain parts of history, and I'm speaking just for the Western world, totally normal to dress boys and girls in dresses until the boys were old enough to be "breeched" - that is wear their first pair of breeches/trousers. Jobs and roles have been gendered over the years: take making beer for example. For several centuries, beer making was associated as a woman's role. Then there was a shift in the gender roles not only around making beer, but also of the places where it was sold and consumed, and thus beer-making became a pretty exclusively male thing. Certain parts of farm work used to be gendered a certain way: in the 19th century, many farms considered the dairy and the chickens to be women's work. It was only when there was a move in industrialization and larger scale production that these became 'men's work.' These sorts of shifts happen all throughout the years. It also happens with emotions: there was a pretty good period between the 12th-18th century when men who cried were seen as exhibiting pure emotion, and especially when connected with praying, was looked on as something very good. The manliest men were those who would cry. Men crying these days, although the discourse around it is starting to change, kinda freaks people out. As the other commenters have already stated, this preoccupation with men's work/women's work/toys/colours etc usually has more to do with the insecurity of the speaker. Kids are so young and innocent of this sort of conditioning, so I think you are right to be concerned about the messages your children are getting from family members.
    5 points
  25. sr.christinaosf

    Religious Life and COVID-19 Vaccines

    There is also freedom of conscience, and one's knowledge of themselves, their health and the way their body reacts.
    5 points
  26. Luigi

    prayer requests to convents

    Prayer requests are often vague - "For a special intention" - but the nuns pray for the intentions anyway. The person asking for prayers can be a friend of the community or a complete stranger - the nuns pray for their intentions anyway. The request can be made in person, by handwritten mail, or by e-mail - the nuns pray for the intention anyway. It can be a sunny day, a cloudy day, a rainy day, or a snowy day - the nuns pray for the intentions anyway. Some people send a donation to the nuns, and some people don't (or can't) - the nuns pray for the intentions anyway. Any other questions?
    5 points
  27. KaytePost

    Kayte Discerns (An Ongoing Journey)

    Y'all, I'm going on a visit this weekend for a few days (Thurs-Mon to be exact). Please keep me in your prayers!
    5 points
  28. gloriana35

    Am I called to be a nun

    Lying Awake is excellent. I agree with others here - do not do this to yourself. You don't want improvement of your OCD, because you fear a calling to religious life? I still think spiritual direction could be helpful for you, but I, who am not a spiritual director (though I have lived a vowed life since the 1970s), am positive that you should not continue to be obsessed with religious life. I shall add that I have known others (not only Religious, by any means) who seem to think that God will want (and possibly force them into) whatever they most dislike or fear. (They did not have OCD, as far as I know - it can happen to others.) It's a road to mistakes and tragedy. You told us outright you do not want to be a religious - you would rather be ill than healthier, lest God force you into that life. Perhaps you should concentrate on orthopraxy - read the Offices, attend the Eucharist - and focus on worship, not on an image of a fiend who'll force you into a life you fear. Blessings.
    5 points
  29. dominicansoul

    Missing Old Phatmass Members

    Yes! Not fully professed, but getting there! Praise God!
    5 points
  30. GraceUk

    St. Mary Sisters

    Its a bit ambitious to be building a house for 200 sisters if the organisation has only just been founded. How many members are there at present. Still I hope its a success.
    5 points
  31. Winchester

    Without me, Phatmass would be called "Catholic Talk Place"

    I met DusT in 1986 at a Dallas Cowboy's game. He was a toilet attendant, and he was replacing stale urinal cakes in the pee trough. It was halftime, so no one else was in the bathroom, because at Cowboy's games, the best part is halftime. Even when there's no show. People would literally rather stare at the empty field. I went to the far end of the trough. dUSt was laughing to himself. I asked him why. "These urinal cakes, in addition to tasting funny, can't be pronounced." He showed me the packaging "Pahumes Pahighter?" The label said "Phumes Phiter " "That's pronounced the same way as an "F". He was floored. I didn't think anything of it until years later when I saw this website. You're welcome, DuSt.
    5 points
  32. Sponsa-Christi

    Discerning without parents' support

    Ultimately, you following God's will for your life will be for your good and everyone else's--including your parents'. Also, most parents come around when they see their children happy in their vocation. (My parents at first weren't too thrilled about my discernment, but when the time came for my actual consecration they were almost embarrassingly supportive and happy for me!) That being said, as I think you already sense, this is a big shock for your parents, so you probably need to be patient and give them the emotional "space" they need to process this news. Also, provided that you're not incurring student loans that would be challenging to pay back quickly, I don't think that finishing college is a bad idea. I think it is possible to "lose" a vocation if you did something like put it on the back burner for ten years while you drifted through life aimlessly; but I don't think it's likely for someone your age with a genuine vocation to lose a vocation in the relatively short and focused time it takes to finish an undergrad degree. Nobody likes to think about it during the "falling in love" phase of discernment, but built into the formation process is the possibility that you may discern out of the community. And you need to feel perfectly free to discern out, and to only stay on until final vows because you are happy in the community and you feel it's where God is continuing to call you--and not because you feel you "have to" stay, or because you couldn't imagine what you would do with your life if you left. Having a degree to fall back on is helpful for discernment in that respect. But even if (God willing!) you do persevere in whatever community you enter, finishing a degree will give you a sense of confidence, self-discipline, and personal maturity that will be a very helpful "dowry" to bring to religious life. And, even if you do wind up entering the community you're hoping to visit, PLEASE do check out at least one or two others, even if it's just a quick weekend visit. I think it makes for a healthier discernment when you have a slightly broader first-hand impression of how religious/consecrated life is lived in the Church today.
    5 points
  33. Sponsa-Christi

    Religious Names

    This has got to be the worst religious name of all time! LOL!
    5 points
  34. PaxCordisJesu

    Discernment Books

    I thought I'd make a thread where people can post books that were helpful in their discernment. I'll start it off! Discerning Religious Life by Sister Clare Matthias, CFR. I just got this book on Kindle Friday, and it's amesome, I read it all in one day! wish I had had this book years ago!!! It has been and will continue to be so helpful in my discernment, I can honestly say that I am finally at peace in my discernment after what seems like ages of anxiety. It brought up a really good point that I had never heard of. Before, I thought discernment was something we all just had to do and figure out, and yes, it's going to be really stressful with a lot of worries about whether or not you're doing the right thing. But this book talks about whether or not you're ready for discernment, and says that you should be in a particular place before seriously discerning any vocation. I never before thought that there might be such a thing as pre-discernment. It really just blew my mind! I'm not going to spoil the book for y'all, but I will just mention a few things that she said were crucial before seriously discerning. Correct way of thinking: How do you think about God? Yourself? Religious Life? If you have the wrong ideas about any of these, or you're discerning for the wrong reasons, this can seriously hinder your discernment. Detachment: Am I detached enough to discern? To have the proper disposition in discernment you have to be ready for any answer—able to accept “yes” and able to accept “no.” Relationship: Do you have a relationship with God? Do you spend time with Him regularly? Do you know that He loves you? Genuine discernment flows from relationship, just like deciding to marry someone flows from falling in love with him/her.
    5 points
  35. Lea

    2021 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    Nine new novices and 13 new postulants for the Dominican Sisters of St. Cecilia: https://www.facebook.com/dominicansistersofsaintcecilia/photos/a.378212398948260/3619194184850049
    5 points
  36. Mercedes

    fides' Jack's Mega Anti-Vax Thread

    The John Hopkins medical centre this week says different. Vaccines are safe and effective and should be encouraged.
    5 points
  37. SicutColumba

    Discerning Consecrated Virginity & SD

    This is good advice from Sponsa Christi but I think if someone is asking you to pay for spiritual direction, you should absolutely take a hike. Showing your gratitude to your SD with occasional, spontaneous favors or gifts is fine and good. Being asked to pay regular fees is wrong and to me it borders on exploitation.
    5 points
  38. Peace

    Made it back to mass for the first time in over a year

    One year? I'd be walking around with a bullet-proof vest and a life-preserver on.
    5 points
  39. catholicamama

    2021 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    Prayers for our daughter as she will be entering DSMME on August 22nd. I think there are 11 other young women also entering as postulants that day.
    5 points
  40. Peace

    Benedictine Compline

    I don't know why but I've always liked the word "compline". It just has a nice ring to it that makes my mind feel relaxed when I hear it. Everyone say it with me now: compline. Thank you.
    5 points
  41. AveMariaPurissima

    2021 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    Twelve new novices for the Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist. https://www.facebook.com/dsmme/posts/4371021856295167
    5 points
  42. Jaime

    TRADITIONIS CUSTODES

    I had a hard time imagining a day when @KnightofChrist and I would ever be on the same side of a debate. But here we are! I'm going to confession today because we must be nearing the end of the world. That this is being done for the sake of unity is a lie. Of course this brings more division. It's yet one more thing in our world that suggests "wouldn't the world be a better place if". and it's not. I don't recall ever attending a TLM. But the idea that it should be restricted (read "ended") in the name of ANYTHING is just wrong. As I get older, I become more hesitant to be critical of clergy, vatican officials, the pope, but I cannot see this as a good move at all.
    5 points
  43. dUSt

    Biblically accurate angels are crazy

    5 points
  44. gloriana35

    Repost on "Mature Discerners"

    Offhand, it strikes me that, until I saw this forum, I'd had no idea that there were various women seeking to enter religious life when they were 60-80 (I recall someone once asking who took 'older vocation,' and mentioning that age group when those responding mentioned communities which accepted women who were over 40.) I could be totally incorrect, but I wonder if many ladies, perhaps born in the 1940s or 50s, had some inclination towards convent life in youth, but had some reason they did not pursue this. In 1960, to choose a date at random, many girls and young women had known many religious - there might be a large group just teaching in a parish school. Many Sisters entered convent, at a young age, after the war years. Then, c. 1970, they started leaving in droves. Those who were devout, who may have been encouraged to enter a convent ten years earlier, were likely to be discouraged. I wonder if some have a life-long dream (still with rose-coloured glasses?), which they hope to fulfil in their mature years? Even some of the young here seem to be pining for a perfect past which never existed. It is not only about religious life. I am of mature years. I indeed miss some past situations (not necessarily religious at all.) Yet participate on a forum about the 'good old days,' and there is an idea that things were far more perfect than they were.
    5 points
  45. dUSt

    Missing Old Phatmass Members

    WHO GOT BANNED!?!? This is weird, but I often wonder about phatmassers who may have died, and we have no idea they are dead.
    5 points
  46. DameAgnes

    Joy and Holy Normalcy

    https://www.americamagazine.org/faith/2022/03/16/vocation-purpose-women-religious-sisters-242542
    4 points
  47. Sponsa-Christi

    New EF Community - Servants of the Children of Light

    Maybe this is a bit off-topic, but I personally think it's relevant (or at least useful context here)...technically, a group doesn't need to go through the "association of the faithful" stage at all before becoming a full-fledged religious community. Theoretically, a group could just canonically start out as religious institute of diocesan right if the local bishop wanted to do this--although these days, as per canon 579, a bishop would have to get Rome's approval first, and it's extremely unlikely Rome would approve a new institute with just a very small handful of members. But there actually aren't any canonical membership number required anywhere; Rome decides this things case-by-case, even though canon lawyers involved in these matters will tend to notice patterns. Associations of the faithful are sort of the closest fit to having something like an organized group living a religious life and accountable within canon law, but without officially being religious. It's not a perfect arrangement, but on a very practical level it does tend to work. Interestingly, I had a canon law professor who actually thought it was regrettable that the category of public association of the faithful was so often used for proto-religious communities. His thought was that this category should really be used more for what it was originally, primarily intended: i.e., for Catholics in various stages of life to associate themselves for some common (but "non-vocation") spiritual or apostolic purpose. With this situation specifically, I don't know what is going on canonically behind the scenes. But my best guess is that if this is an attempt at a new community with only one member in "first vows," then probably what is going on is that the foundress made a technically private vow with the bishop as a witness.
    4 points
  48. gloriana35

    Torn (desire for RL keeps coming back)

    Sometimes, people who have mental illnesses, or even certain types of temperaments, are fully able to live a vowed life. The problem is community life. Of course, most of those who join third orders do not profess the evangelical counsels, and you may not find any support in your vowed life. It can seem more as if you just joined a club, and that could make the sense of loss all the greater. I very much hope you can work out how to live your commitment to consecrated life, and find truly sound direction.
    4 points
  49. Ash Wednesday

    New phorum upgrade... We're all NOOBS!

    This calls for the old dancing banana
    4 points
  50. Norseman82

    Missing Old Phatmass Members

    Just check to see who voted in Chicago.....
    4 points
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