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Are the ones without the blue stripes on their veils postulants or novices? 

 

The ones with white veils are Novices. The postulants don't wear the MC sari, this is given to them when they become Novices.

Edited by nunsense
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Most interesting veils I've seen! These are Sisters of the Most Holy Soul of Christ.

 

I know the tall sister on the far left!!! She is from Poland, but she lives in Florida with the American branch of their congregation. She told me that they wear the modified habit and veil when they are in warm climates. When the sisters go to Poland, they wear the traditional habit and veil pictured above. 

Edited by be_thou_my_vision
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"The Poor Clare is called to be the 'passionate lover of the poor, crucified Christ' with Whom she wants to identify absolutely. She sees in His Incarnation the poverty of Christ, Who in His humility took on flesh and made Himself subject to man; the nativity and the passion are the focus of the Poor Clare's devotion and meditation."

 

Poor Clares in Brenham, Texas: http://www.franciscanpoorclares.org/index.html

 

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"In all we do we strive to seek and use the talents God has blessed us with, and truly have our work flow from our life of prayer and flow back into our prayers so that all things become for us a prayer and a communion with God."

 

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"In imitating the humble Christ we discover who we are before God: nothing, yet everything."

 

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"December 2009 - Msgr. Michael Mulvey celebrated Mass for us on Christmas Day. Here he is shown with Sr. Mary Joseph and Sr. Holy Spirit. Father Michael is a longtime friend of the community, being the grand-nephew of our own Sr. Margaret Mary. In January 2010, the announcement was made that Fr. Michael had been appointed Bishop of Corpus Christi!"

 

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"Ceramic-making gives us an opportunity to be creative, and at the same time make a product to sell in our gift shop; the gift shop features mostly our hand-cast and handpainted ceramics pieces, such as nativity sets. We also make rosaries and homemade breads for sale."

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I recently found a book in the library about monastic life in the Netherlands and Flanders, only containing pictures to compare now and decades ago. The Eindhoven PCC's were in it, both the old community and the new (American) sisters. Sorry for the "poor" ( :hehe2:) quality, the book was too big to scan, I took pictures instead.

 

 

The Dutch PCC's now (in their retirement home).

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The Dutch PCC's how they used to be.

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The monastery became to big for them and they moved to a house. They were replaced by a delegation of the Roswell PCC's:

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Thank you for these pics, Non Novi! I really enjoyed them. These Sisters have a facebook page, a blog, and a great video on youtube.

 

Edit: Just wanted to add that the postulant pictured here took her solemn vows a couple years ago! 


I'm glad you enjoyed them :priest: I believe these pictures where taken around 2005 (and the old ones in the fifthies).

 

The video is a bit confusing for me, because I hear them speaking Dutch in the background. Sister Coleta-Maria is obviously Flemish like me, I can hear it in the way she speaks English :)

Edited by NonNovi
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I'm glad you enjoyed them :priest: I believe these pictures where taken around 2005 (and the old ones in the fifthies).

 

The video is a bit confusing for me, because I hear them speaking Dutch in the background. Sister Coleta-Maria is obviously Flemish like me, I can hear it in the way she speaks English :)

 

Yes, the convent language is Dutch, but the Sisters who came from Roswell, NM speak English. However, I think the English is a voice-over translation, and I am unsure whether the voice over is a different or the nuns' voices. :idontknow:

 

So interesting that you can pick up on Sister being Flemish! I guess it would be like how I could spot s a Texan accent..oh, wait, everyone can do that?? :P

Edited by emmaberry101
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Yes, the convent language is Dutch, but the Sisters who came from Roswell, NM speak English. However, I think the English is a voice-over translation, and I am unsure whether the voice over is a different or the nuns' voices. :idontknow:

 

So interesting that you can pick up on Sister being Flemish! I guess it would be like how I could spot s a Texan accent..oh, wait, everyone can do that?? :P

Yes, it's a voice-over, I've seen the original video in Dutch too somewhere. The Roswell Sisters also speak Dutch and they handle it very well, wich is pretty impressive for Americans. Dutch is a difficult language for the English speaking. The voice-over are the same Sisters by the way.

 

It's not that hard to recognise if you're Flemish yourself. Especially when she says "postulare", that's how our Dutch sounds. Her English sounds like she didn't learn it in school but only by speaking and reading it. My English doesn't sound like that at all.

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