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Bride Of Christ


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You might be wedded to the idea that the essence of an enclosed nun's vocation is to be bride, but surely all enclosed nuns do not consider themselves such. This imagery, though rich in symbolism, does not work logistically for many religious women, including active Sisters, who are “brides of Christ,” but not enclosed. As well, widows and formerly married women who are now enclosed in religious life, but are not virgins. When an individual decides to follow Christ, they are faced with the personal choice into which identity, complicated or simple, they become espoused in the Theological sense. Aside from their commitment in front of the Body of Christ, the Church, they come with their own unique and personal espousal and commitment. Relation-ship is dynamic ( assuming growth in depth and richness)even in marriage commitments, and Consecrated Virginity is merely another unique relationship and partnership with Christ.

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You might be wedded to the idea that the essence of an enclosed nun's vocation is to be bride, but surely all enclosed nuns do not consider themselves such. This imagery, though rich in symbolism, does not work logistically for many religious women, including active Sisters, who are “brides of Christ,” but not enclosed. As well, widows and formerly married women who are now enclosed in religious life, but are not virgins. When an individual decides to follow Christ, they are faced with the personal choice into which identity, complicated or simple, they become espoused in the Theological sense. Aside from their commitment in front of the Body of Christ, the Church, they come with their own unique and personal espousal and commitment. Relation-ship is dynamic ( assuming growth in depth and richness)even in marriage commitments, and Consecrated Virginity is merely another unique relationship and partnership with Christ.

 

TIWW ,

 

That's a good insight . Public vocations have the elements of Explicit identity and commitment common to the particular form of Consecrated life , as well as Implicit Personal vocation of every individual.

 

In the spiritual relationship with God which is implicit, personal and dynamic , each one has a Call within a Call . This is in terms of Being as well as Doing.

 

So a consecrated person may relate with Jesus  as a friend, brother , spouse , child , lover ,father, master , teacher etc. in dynamic  ways in different situations with different people in whom  he or she sees the presence of Christ.

 

Besides the general charism of a vocation- a person may have a more specific gift in service or a personal calling that is compatible with that form of consecrated life and the individual's gifts and talents.

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I've never met an enclosed nun or an active sister who *didn't* consider herself His bride.

 

Call me stupid or silly, but for your active sisters' example, that only makes me think that a wife who works is any less a wife or less committed to her husband than a housewife. 

 

Have you ever heard of someone whose first spouse died, and then remarried? Here's a popular example - the Brady Bunch. I know many Catholic couples who have done this, old and not so old. Sometimes both spouses have previously lost their first spouse, other times only one. It does happen. 

 

You might be wedded to the idea that the essence of an enclosed nun's vocation is to be bride, but surely all enclosed nuns do not consider themselves such. This imagery, though rich in symbolism, does not work logistically for many religious women, including active Sisters, who are “brides of Christ,” but not enclosed. As well, widows and formerly married women who are now enclosed in religious life, but are not virgins. When an individual decides to follow Christ, they are faced with the personal choice into which identity, complicated or simple, they become espoused in the Theological sense. Aside from their commitment in front of the Body of Christ, the Church, they come with their own unique and personal espousal and commitment. Relation-ship is dynamic ( assuming growth in depth and richness)even in marriage commitments, and Consecrated Virginity is merely another unique relationship and partnership with Christ.

 

Edited by reminiscere
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TIWW ,

 

That's a good insight . Public vocations have the elements of Explicit identity and commitment common to the particular form of Consecrated life , as well as Implicit Personal vocation of every individual.

 

In the spiritual relationship with God which is implicit, personal and dynamic , each one has a Call within a Call . This is in terms of Being as well as Doing.

 

 

So a consecrated person may relate with Jesus  as a friend, brother , spouse , child , lover ,father, master , teacher etc. in dynamic  ways in different situations with different people in whom  he or she sees the presence of Christ.

 

Besides the general charism of a vocation- a person may have a more specific gift in service or a personal calling that is compatible with that form of consecrated life and the individual's gifts and talents.

 

Was unable to edit the previous post as mentioned above . This is what I wanted to add--

 

So a consecrated person may personally relate with Jesus  as a friend, brother , spouse , child , lover ,father, master , teacher etc. in dynamic  ways --as well as -- in different situations with different people in whom  he or she sees the presence of Christ.

 

 

Besides the general charism of a vocation- a person may have a more specific gift in service or a personal calling that is compatible with that form of consecrated life and the individual's gifts and talents.

 

I think the crisis in religious life around the world during recent decades may be related to the fact that the traditional religious institutes stressed too much on the common identity and mission of the institutes  at the expense of the personal vocation , gifts and talents of each individual member. This could have led to dissatisfaction and mass exit by so many over the years.

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I like the point made that service in The Church is maternal.  One serves with one's whole being and life lovingly as a loving mother would.

 

The Church is her entire baptised membership in Grace and constitutes the Mystical Body of Christ on earth.  Christ lives on in His Church on earth.  If The Church is the Spouse of Christ and The Church is her membership, then every baptised person in Grace has a spousal relationship with Jesus, who is The Christ.

 

This is why Pope Benedict said, to my mind, that we have only the sins IN The Church to fear.  It is a terrible matter!

 

Ideally, to my mind, a Consecrated Virgin will witness to the Virginity of The Church giving Her whole self in Grace to God.  Therefore a witness too to this humble lay person and all other vocations in The Church.  In an ideal sense all vocations speak to each other of some aspect of the Life of Jesus on earth -  and witness to each other.

As an outsider to the vocation of CV, I really can't understand why those who are called and consecrated to Consecrated Virginity do seem to have so many problems and differences of opinion with their vocation and call.  It is a very special way of life in the consecrated life aspect of The Church.  One is called to be virginal giving their whole heart and soul, body, to God alone and in a secular way of life.

 

To my way of thinking the priesthood of Holy Orders is totally different to the priesthood of all the baptised.  Graces granted do really differ in many aspects.  The Gifts to the priesthood of Holy Orders are a stunning and amazing matter absolutely!!!  Having lived a chaste celibate life for as many years as I have, it aint such a big deal, because The Lord has granted me (a wretch such as me!) the Grace to do so and any wonder at it all is His to claim, His ownership - and Jesus always scores in all things 10/10 regardless of whom, where or why He chooses. 

 

..........  Donkeys years back there was a big difference of opinion amongst theologians about which way of life was the most perfect,  I think (unsure) it was settled that 'the winner' was active/contemplative with three theological angels, all the other vocations only scored one theological angel or twostuck-in-locker-smiley-emoticon.gif on the head of the proverbial pin.

Edited by BarbaraTherese
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I've never met an enclosed nun or an active sister who *didn't* consider herself His bride.

 

Call me stupid or silly, but for your active sisters' example, that only makes me think that a wife who works is any less a wife or less committed to her husband than a housewife. 

 

I have met plenty of active sisters who didn't consider herself the Lord's bride.  They saw themselves as a daughter or friend or sister or some other relationship.  Again, reason to stop, reflect, and ask why.  Is it because, as I hold, the essence of religious life is not spousal per se (but participates in it) but something else? 

 

Not knowing who you are addressing re: active sisters' example, I am not sure I totally get your point, but I'm with you as far as your own observation is concerned.  This is why consecrated virgins can BE brides of Christ and work ordinary jobs.  Spouses are no less spouses for working. 

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To my way of thinking the priesthood of Holy Orders is totally different to the priesthood of all the baptised.

 

Agreed.  And that's exactly what I'm claiming about Consecrated Virginity.  That the CV's spousal relationship is totally different than the common spousal relationship of the baptized and other consecrated persons.  If it isn't totally different, then, yeah, one could be "nitpicking" and "counting angels on a pin", but if it IS totally different, then it becomes extremely important to understand. 

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Agreed.  And that's exactly what I'm claiming about Consecrated Virginity.  That the CV's spousal relationship is totally different than the common spousal relationship of the baptized and other consecrated persons.  If it isn't totally different, then, yeah, one could be "nitpicking" and "counting angels on a pin", but if it IS totally different, then it becomes extremely important to understand. 

 

 

I can't understand why since CV falls within "consecrated life", while Holy Orders is completely separate from the lay state in life and from the consecrated state (consecrated state embracing the CV vocation).  They are all obviously different - and yet CV is under the category of "consecrated life", not in a category of its own.

 

As an outsider of the vocation, and once I thought I once understood the vocation; however this thread and other discussions I have read by CV's in recent yearsa (and rather often) is totally confusing as so many are argumentative and by CV's.  The Lord grants the Grace of virginity for life - just as He gave me the Grace of wife, motherhood and a family life initially and to go from there the Grace of celibate chastity is an almost remarkable step for such as I in itself, considering human sexuality - and that I suffer Bipolar Disorder known to have a quite common and general problem with sexuality/promscuity especially during episodes and yet I feel not even a flutter and of course it is the exception that proves any rule.  To my mind, I simply have The Grace of celibate chastity and no big deal - The Lord dispenses His Graces as He may to whomsoever He may and for His own reasons.  He calls whomsoever He may to whatever vocation He may - and for his own reasons.

 

I haven't found the transition from wife, mother and family life to celibate life an easy one and most especially during episodes of Bipolar Disorder.  It was dreadfully difficult and yet something kept urging me on and that was the Grace of the lay celibate chaste vocation in life.  I had an annulment and could have married in The Church Sacramentally as vocation - but it was not my vocation.

 

I more than suspect that some posts are "nitpicking" and "counting angels on the head of a pin".    Some are argumentative posts and sometimes quite unkind ones.

 

Why in ordinary everyday terms that a quite ordinary Catholic can understand is the CV's spousal relationship so different?  Or isn't it necessary for the ordinary everyday Catholic to understand and be able to explain the vocation, including to children?

 

The Spouse of Christ is The Church who is Her membership -  and I am every much a member of The Church through baptism not through my vocation in life.  How an earth can a faithful spousal relationship and through that vocation to which one is called be different in different vocations, other than that the holiness of an individual in any vocation may differ.  And holiness including through faithfulness to our vocation constitutes holiness.

Edited by BarbaraTherese
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If I may ask a question about CV's -- to whom are they answerable? To their bishop? Other consecrated religious must answer to their superiors, but I'm just wondering about that. A nun or sister might have her conscience pricked or her methods credibly questioned. Who helps a CV with her examen?

This is a very difficult thread. Since I am only a mother and not a Bride of Christ, allow me to say something I've told my children: if a lot of your friends are telling you you're being a poor playmate, perhaps you need to consider how you're playing. 

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I can't understand why since CV falls within "consecrated life", while Holy Orders is completely separate from the lay state in life and from the consecrated state (consecrated state embracing the CV vocation).  They are all obviously different - and yet CV is under the category of "consecrated life", not in a category of its own.

 

As an outsider of the vocation, and once I thought I once understood the vocation; however this thread and other discussions I have read by CV's in recent yearsa (and rather often) is totally confusing as so many are argumentative and by CV's.  The Lord grants the Grace of virginity for life - just as He gave me the Grace of wife, motherhood and a family life initially and to go from there the Grace of celibate chastity is an almost remarkable step for such as I in itself, considering human sexuality - and that I suffer Bipolar Disorder known to have a quite common and general problem with sexuality/promscuity especially during episodes and yet I feel not even a flutter and of course it is the exception that proves any rule.  To my mind, I simply have The Grace of celibate chastity and no big deal - The Lord dispenses His Graces as He may to whomsoever He may and for His own reasons.  He calls whomsoever He may to whatever vocation He may - and for his own reasons.

 

I haven't found the transition from wife, mother and family life to celibate life an easy one and most especially during episodes of Bipolar Disorder.  It was dreadfully difficult and yet something kept urging me on and that was the Grace of the lay celibate chaste vocation in life.  I had an annulment and could have married in The Church Sacramentally as vocation - but it was not my vocation.

 

I more than suspect that some posts are "nitpicking" and "counting angels on the head of a pin".    Some are argumentative posts and sometimes quite unkind ones.

 

Why in ordinary everyday terms that a quite ordinary Catholic can understand is the CV's spousal relationship so different?  Or isn't it necessary for the ordinary everyday Catholic to understand and be able to explain the vocation, including to children?

 

The Spouse of Christ is The Church who is Her membership -  and I am every much a member of The Church through baptism not through my vocation in life.  How an earth can a faithful spousal relationship and through that vocation to which one is called be different in different vocations, other than that the holiness of an individual in any vocation may differ.  And holiness including through faithfulness to our vocation constitutes holiness.

 

Hi Barbara, I can understand the confusion that this subject generates.  As you point out, consecrated virginity is one form of consecration among many.  What makes it different from the other forms of consecration is not the totality of the self gift to the Lord but what is consecrated and its implications in theology, wouldn't you agree? 

 

The Church is the Bride of Christ but its members image her bridal relationship in different ways.  We are all brides of Christ by virtue of our baptism.  This is the same way we are all priests of Christ by virtue of our baptism.  If we are all brides, then, what makes the different vocations different?  I think you were asking this in your last paragraph, right?  The Church seems to say that marriage reflects the bridal vocation of the Church in one way, and consecrated virginity (consecrated life and celibacy for the sake of the Kingdom) in a different way.  

 

We know that these differences are not based on holiness but on concretely different forms of life. If we couldn't pinpoint what these different ways of life are, then we couldn't really say they were different.  So, we need to turn to the Church documents to understand what it is that makes different ways of life different paths to holiness.  We need the feet in the Body of Christ.  We need the ears to hear.  We also need the heart and fingers!  Each of us plays different roles and only God knows how holy we become in the role that He has destined for us!  This is because holiness is not dependent on what our state in life is, but on how we grow in the love of God, how we correspond to His grace in how we respond to His will.

 

Priests have a ministry in the Church.  They represent Christ as other Christs!  So we know that the difference between the ordained priest and the common priest is that they are given a power to do things that most of us do not share.  Married people reflect Christ's spousal union with the Church.  Part of the definition of their vocation which makes it different from the other vocations is that they have the use of their sexual powers in marriage.  This is part of what it means to be married!  Religious women have as their big difference in the Church the fact that they observe and profess the evangelical counsels but live them in a way that is separated from the world in community.  That is what makes their path different from other forms of consecrated life! 

 

Members of secular institutes observe and profess the evangelical counsels but live them in the world and not necessarily in community.  This is how their consecration is different than religious consecration!  Consecrated virgins are consecrated to be brides of Christ.  There is no other definition of their vocation.  This is what makes them different than other consecrated people.  For people who have not been following this thread, I am going to repeat myself and remind everyone that I have said elsewhere that the Church recognizes all consecrations as equal in dignity but different and complementary.  The Church says the same thing of men and women.  They are equal in dignity but are different and complementary.  If we were to say that they were the same thing, then we would be making a big mistake! 

 

Living chastely is a huge deal, and Church speaks very highly of people who forgo marriage for the Kingdom.  I really think your struggles will come with a great reward!  While you may not enjoy the grace that consecration brings to a person, you are still living out your baptismal call to holiness in the way you see God calling you to which is edifying.  It may be that you might achieve a greater level of holiness than most of us on this board!  Our different ways of serving God don't automatically bring holiness.  Holiness is something we all have to work out in fear and trembling. 

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I got as far as page 11 - then I stopped. Much as my ego longs for the great grace of being a true and worthy bride of Christ. I am more than happy to be His poorest servant - as long as I can keep close to Him, please him and do his will. I know he loves me - and that is much more than enough for me, even if my ego raises its ugly, selfish head from time to time.  :)

 

Thanks for your humble post, Lil'Nun :) I see what you are saying... It is not for me to decide if I would be a bride of Christ or not, that is His decision, and I can't presume upon it, or who He chooses. If He calls me to be a littlest servant, I hope I'll have the grace and humility to accept that fully.

Coming back to the theme of this thread :

 

Many religious sisters I know do not see themselves as brides of Christ. Some see Him as a brother, father, friend, Guru or Teacher , Role-Model in service , as Truth to satisfy their thirst etc.

 

I know some belonging to the LCWR in USA who actually oppose the imagery of bride of Christ applied specifically to consecrated women .

 

There are religious in Africa and Asia who are moving away from this imagery due to past experiences of abuse by clergy.

 

There are an increasing number of women religious who desire that the Church should allow ordination of women , so they prefer to see themselves as 'Another Christ'  or Christ as Servant etc.

 

on Phatmass there seem to be majority of traditional and conservative women . If the threads on the Phorum are read by those who follow the more liberal line of thinking of the National catholic reporter , they will find it too conservative.

 

One thing I agree is that discerners should know what is the Essence or Charism of each vocation to be able to make informed choices. Seeing the growing number of religious women who do not see themselves as brides of Christ , it is becoming clear that  in today's world -being called bride of Christ is not the Charism or Essence of Religious life in general. So religious women who do see themselves as brides of Christ should not feel that CVs claim superiority or monopoly over this tradition.

 

The Second Vatican Council  which led to update of the Code of Canon law  has clearly stated the Equality of dignity of all the baptized.

God's Beloved, - regarding how many religious see themselves as brides of Christ.. I've mostly looked into more traditional habited orders. Of those, many used bridal or spousal imagery on their websites or I would guess would have a bridal spirituality. To me that's very significant. I don't want to speak against the other orders - but I know there are some really liberal ones that might not follow all the Church teachings or want ordination of women etc as you said - if an order wants ordination of women, or is really liberal in other ways, I wouldn't really doubt bridal imagery in general just because they don't use it. I'd look at the orders that are following the Church's traditions faithfully. By the way, I'm not saying that all active orders are liberal, or anything like that: I'm commenting on the actually liberal ones. Unfortunately it seems there are such orders, but - the traditional ones are the ones that are growing.

 

Recently the Prefect of the Congregation for the Inst. of Cons. life in Rome , during an interview  stated the openness of the Church to Men being Consecrated as Virgins  according to the OCV .

 

By the time the Church formally defines several of the concepts related to Consecrated virginity that is presently reserved for women , maybe  men will also be allowed . Then the whole theology will change. There are such rapid changes taking place in the world, we need to be open to reading and hearing things that may be shocking  or painful to hear . Consecrated women especially need to be strong emotionally to face all kinds of discussions and questions today , even if they seem to challenge our traditional beliefs and understanding in various matters.

 

I'm a little puzzled... if Consecrated Virgins are brides of Christ, - men aren' t brides of Christ (unless we're talking about the soul being made to unite with God in Heaven, as part of the Church). Plus there isn't a tradition for it. For men, it sounds like more like a 'dedication to be celibate for the Kingdom' or something - not being His brides, which is confusing and men wouldn't be drawn to that anyway unless we're talking about the soul being part of the Church. So I wonder if that's what they're talking about or not, maybe they didn't give more info, so maybe giving them the benefit of the doubt since I don't know what is being referred to... it would need to be examined by the Congregation of the Doctrine of the Faith, as AbrideofChrist said.

 

Regarding what you said about facing new questions today - I think that there are some things to consider... one is that Catholic dogma doesn't change. (even if someone tries to change it, we can't change it, it's revelation from God). Regarding non dogmatic traditions, - that's still considered as basis for practices in the Church... I can't speak for the Church, or make these types of decisions, as I'm not a Bishop/Cardinal/Pope, (haha obviously) - but our traditions are important.

 

In my own life - I'm drawn to the more traditional practices, and I find they give me peace. Even if something else is allowed as an indult, etc, - I still like the follow the traditional way myself, again because it helps me spiritually the most. :)

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Hi Barbara, I can understand the confusion that this subject generates.  As you point out, consecrated virginity is one form of consecration among many.  What makes it different from the other forms of consecration is not the totality of the self gift to the Lord but what is consecrated and its implications in theology, wouldn't you agree? 

 

 

Hi BoC……My apologies, but I cannot understand what you mean by “implications in theology” although, since physical virginity is consecrated to God, I can see that that this is serious, but then so is it quite serious to be consecrated to a vow of Chastity. Just as it is a quite serious matter to be baptised and confirmed! In all cases, the whole self at the time of consecration to God is offered.  I am sorry if I just don’t get it, but then I just don’t get it.

I think I know what you might be trying to state in this thread, while hoping I am wrong.  And the hoping I am wrong is why I come back to this thread now and then..........only to find it hasn't progressed at all facing-problems-smiley-emoticon.gif

 

The Church is the Bride of Christ but its members image her bridal relationship in different ways.  We are all brides of Christ by virtue of our baptism.  This is the same way we are all priests of Christ by virtue of our baptism.  If we are all brides, then, what makes the different vocations different?  I think you were asking this in your last paragraph, right?  The Church seems to say that marriage reflects the bridal vocation of the Church in one way, and consecrated virginity (consecrated life and celibacy for the sake of the Kingdom) in a different way.  

 

To my way of thinking, The Church is the Mystical Body of Christ.  We are the One Body of Christ on earth; therefore, each vocation each in their own unique manner continues the work of Jesus on earth.  To me the Life of the Church in Grace is more about Unity with Jesus (i.e. spousal relationship) than any sort of bridal understanding in secular terms.  Although in Church lingo, “Bride” is spot on and draws ALL THE BAPTISED into a spousal relationship with Jesus witnessing in an exterior manner to different aspects of Jesus.  St Paul was absolutely brilliant.........and inspired.cheesy-grin-smiley-emoticon.gif..............in his comparison to The Mystical Body of Christ on earth and Her members to different parts of the body.  An ear does not speak, a mouth does not hear etc. etc. or whatever.  As simple as that in the various vocational states with associated duties, rights, responsibilities and accountabilities.

We know that these differences are not based on holiness but on concretely different forms of life. If we couldn't pinpoint what these different ways of life are, then we couldn't really say they were different.  So, we need to turn to the Church documents to understand what it is that makes different ways of life different paths to holiness.  We need the feet in the Body of Christ.  We need the ears to hear.  We also need the heart and fingers!  Each of us plays different roles and only God knows how holy we become in the role that He has destined for us!  This is because holiness is not dependent on what our state in life is, but on how we grow in the love of God, how we correspond to His grace in how we respond to His will.

 

And to my way of thought, this is all the different roles or vocations are in The Church – i.e. different ways of witnessing to Christ and continuing His Work on earth.  To my way of thinking, consecrated virginity in secular life spells it all out and no need to go any further – again, to my way of thinking. 

That is one point. 

How holy we become in our particular vocation will be largely how we live out the duties of our vocation IN RESPONSE TO GRACES OFFERED.  In stating that one is a consecrated virgin in secular life to my way of thought again.......... all is clearly spelt out for the person concerned who is consecrated to virginity.  I really can't see what is difficult about it unless one starts counting those jolly angels on a pin and theology nitpicking and perhaps looking for something that really isn't there.  This just might account for the great difficulty some CV's seem to have talking to each other about their vocation.  Dunnoembarrassed-smiley-face.gif

We used to play a game as children "Creepy up" and I keep wondering if the CV's theological problems with their vocations is engaging in a play similar to "Creepy up".

 

Priests have a ministry in the Church.  They represent Christ as other Christs!  So we know that the difference between the ordained priest and the common priest is that they are given a power to do things that most of us do not share

 

.

Far more than “representing Christ”, at times they act “in persona Christi” – an amesome and stunning matter to put it very extremely, extremely, mildly.  What a wondrous blessing to His Church are vocations to the priesthood and essential to the life of The Church unlike other vocations – although without marriage, we would have no priests either.

 

 Married people reflect Christ's spousal union with the Church.  Part of the definition of their vocation which makes it different from the other vocations is that they have the use of their sexual powers in marriage.  This is part of what it means to be married

 

 

I know this.

.....................cont next Post

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Religious women have as their big difference in the Church the fact that they observe and profess the evangelical counsels but live them in a way that is separated from the world in community.  That is what makes their path different from other forms of consecrated life! 

 

I know this.

Members of secular institutes observe and profess the evangelical counsels but live them in the world and not necessarily in community.  This is how their consecration is different than religious consecration!

 

I know this. 

Although I don’t understand all of Church language by a long shot, since theologically behind one word can be a very complex theological understanding, or at times not so complex. At times a theological word or term does not have at all the same meaning in secular vernacular. 

 

The duties of their state in life in a secular institute, are simply different from the duties of a religious……….to my way of thought and no big deal.  Whatever, however, whenever, whomsoever The Lord may wish .......

..................and always!nodding-yes-by-a-very-happy-smiley-emoti.................and He really needs our approval, I don't think.

 

Consecrated virgins are consecrated to be brides of Christ.  There is no other definition of their vocation.  This is what makes them different than other consecrated people.

 

I don’t understand what you are stating.  We all have a spousal relationship with Christ in that we all ideally seek Unity with Him who Is God – or share in the true“bridal nature” rather than "bridal role" of The Church. 

Consecrated Virgins are in the consecrated state of life and therefore their duties are different from those in religious life or a secular institute, simple.

 

For people who have not been following this thread, I am going to repeat myself and remind everyone that I have said elsewhere that the Church recognizes all consecrations as equal in dignity but different and complementary.  The Church says the same thing of men and women.  They are equal in dignity but are different and complementary.  If we were to say that they were the same thing, then we would be making a big mistake! 

 

Precisely!

 

Living chastely is a huge deal, and Church speaks very highly of people who forgo marriage for the Kingdom. 

 

Rather, it is not a huge deal at all because it is a work of Graces granted!  Just as for other vocations.  The credit is never ours.

 I really think your struggles will come with a great reward

 

No more than anyone else in any vocation at all, even my local garbo (sorry, mate – I keep picking on you!!!curly-lips-sorry-smiley-emoticon.gif ) , who responds positively (through ACTUAL GRACE) to Graces granted.

To Grace the Glory – there is none in or for me whatsoever in the slightest degree!

While you may not enjoy the grace that consecration brings to a person, you are still living out your baptismal call to holiness in the way you see God calling you to which is edifying.

 

 

 

Geeeee thhhanNNNks!............ (one good turn deserves another !)

 

Our different ways of serving God don't automatically bring holiness.  Holiness is something we all have to work out in fear and trembling. 

 

 

I know this!

 

PS I’m not following this thread – I gave up around Page 5 or so I think!  It is now 25 pages long on my layout..............and I still have no idea what it is really about...........none whatsoever!confused-and-unsure-smiley-emoticon.gif..............perhaps "Creepy up"............I really don't know!

I love these emoticons! :)

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