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yes that's basically what I'm looking for :) I mean,there are consecrations that don't put you in a consecrated state (like Total Consecration to Jesus through Mary, which I've done). So is this similar? Or does it put us in consecrated life? Cause I'm thinking it could be a special consecration but also not a type of consecrated life (in the way religious etc are I mean).

I'm not saying that makes it unimportant, after all I'm hoping for it myself (once my SD decides its a good time) but it would be nice to understand it. However... Even without such detailed canon law understanding, I believe its truly the heart that matters. If someone wants to give themselves to God. . as long as its an approved way... Then its a beautiful loving thing. I believe Jesus is very happy with it too..I hope :)

Yes, The Church calls the private dedication by vows of one's life totally to God as a "special consecration".  But this does not mean one is in the consecrated state of life as in Canon Law, neither does the Consecration to Jesus through Mary or other forms of private devotional consecrations.  Private vows to the EC are a private devotion too incidentally.

I agree with you that over and above all considerations or even with or without any sort of Church special ceremonies, it remains the heart that matters and where a heart, soul and life is given to God, Jesus beams with Love and Joy, absolutely!  After all, all this is good comes from Him, has Him as its origin - and what one is in fact doing is taking up His Grace offered and depending totally and trustfully on Him to keep one in the Faith and faithful.

I love how you back up your posts with information from the Church. Thank you.

The Church quotes come from all the quite extensive research I have done on private vows for my own information mainly.  And my "Favourites" where all is filed is really extensive :) When I first made the vows, private vows were absolutely unheard of generally- my SD at the time (decd) was a theologian lecturing and living in our seminary -  and I was very surprised indeed to hear from him that it was an approved path in The Church and why it was.  I stumbled and mumbled over what I would like to do (private vows in the Laity) quite wary I might be sprouting some form of heresy.:rain:  Father did not suffer fools gladly - a seminarian told me he would throw telephone books at them sometimes.  I was his penance!

I do try to back up what I am saying with Church quotes so others will know I am not just sprouting my personal ideas and concepts, rather those gleaned from The Church.

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If you make private viows then you simply carry on your life according to them for as long as you're bound and or discern otherwise. If you have an SD and priest to discuss and relate to then great. I

I think the reason why private vows aren't related to hermits very often here is because a vocation to be a canonical hermit involves a lot more than just "making vows outside a community" (just as a

I wonder where Opus Dei falls canonically in terms of vows.  I believe they refer to their vows as "commitments of love."  It's my understanding that there isn't an actually ceremony  formally receiving a numerary into the Prelature.  It seems like a tricky situation since they are free to leave at any point and still be in good standing with the Church.  However, it would still be perceived as the rupture of a promise made to God.  

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I am not at all familiar with Opus Dei either.

Since The Church allows a dispensation through a priest for private vows, there would be no sin attached I would think or the Church would not permit dispensation.  It does remain a personally serious move and not one would make, I would think, without good reasons.  For this same reason, one should not make a private vow lightly.

I think i got it more, thank you! :) 

Great stuff - but keep asking if any more questions crop up, MLF!  :)

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I wonder where Opus Dei falls canonically in terms of vows.  I believe they refer to their vows as "commitments of love."  It's my understanding that there isn't an actually ceremony  formally receiving a numerary into the Prelature.  It seems like a tricky situation since they are free to leave at any point and still be in good standing with the Church.  However, it would still be perceived as the rupture of a promise made to God.  

They don't make vows. Those 'incorporated' into Opus Dei dedicate themselves to the commitments and routine set out by Opus Dei. The idea in Opus Dei is that the prelature unites and supports a person with their vocation, it doesn't replace it. It is similar, I guess, to Societies of Apostolic life.

The relationship is therefore more contractual, between the person and the prelature, even if the person eventually joins for life. With vows the focus is on a bond between the person and God. So the focus is a bit different. Opus Dei members can, of course, make private vows too. The priests within Opus Dei are secular priests in essence, although attached to the prelature (that acts like a diocese).

Opus Dei has a formation period. Numeraries, if they make a life committement, are bound by the terms set out by Opus Dei. They could simply leave, although religious can do this too (if they're not too bothered about standing). In practice though, like religious, they are unlikely to simply walk out after many years of service because, practically, it would be difficult. Most would transfer out in a more steady way. In terms of standing - yes, religious are bound more strictly by their vows (canon law too). If they leave an institute they are prohibited from doing certain things until they have a dispensation, such as attempting to get married. That wouldn't apply in the same way to Opus Dei. However, the priests of Opus Dei are bound by the rules of the prelature and those of canon law that apply to priests in general.

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MLF, check out this blog site on private vows:

http://sponsa-christi.blogspot.com/2011/02/how-do-i-make-private-vow.html?m=1

Here's another interesting website on private vows:

http://ncronline.org/news/sisters-stories/traditional-vows-redefined-21st-century

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Nerd spin-off question on private vows: are they necessarily to the ECs?

No, not at all.  One could simply live the counsels without making private vows and I think perhaps many do and probably without realising it.

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And one could choose to make a very personal vow of some kind.I found these examples:

 

Such vows or promises may consist of a vow to remain celibate for life, a promise to be a missionary for life, a promise to pray the Rosary on a daily basis throughout one's life, a promise to never commit a certain sin, etc...

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Swammi Mommy, thank you very much indeed for your second link especially.  The first link I read quite some time ago - the links within the text have real value http://mulier-fortis.blogspot.com.au/2009/12/many-blessings.html (description of quite a celebration for private vows).  But the second link and especially Part 2 has some very important things to state:

Evolution of the Committed Life - Part 1

Evolution of The Committed Life Part 2

"So, developing, welcoming and celebrating new forms of committed life today need not be feared. They should be welcomed and encouraged. I've seen the ever-evolving committed life in a variety of expressions among the co-members of Loretto. All it requires is openness to the Spirit or, better said, a willingness to dance with the Spirit." http://ncronline.org/news/sisters-stories/traditional-vows-redefined-21st-century

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julianneoflongbeach

I had no idea of any sort of, I guess you could call it, 'formal' private vows. When I decided I would become a CV I made a vow of perpetual virginity just sitting there in bed and went and got a little white gold wedding band at the mall. <3

Thanks for the thread; learn something new everyday :nerd:

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I had no idea of any sort of, I guess you could call it, 'formal' private vows. When I decided I would become a CV I made a vow of perpetual virginity just sitting there in bed and went and got a little white gold wedding band at the mall. <3

Thanks for the thread; learn something new everyday :nerd:

Julianne, my mention of more 'formal' private vows isn't any real distinction in the Church, its just my own wish to repeat my promise with my SD there :) that is not necessary for it to be valid! A private vow is a private vow. :) what I described only applies to me. I made my vow in my own words, in my room, then renewed it a few times and also bought a ring. It was very simple but God looks at the heart!

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When I first made private vows on Feast of Our Lady of The Rosary 1980 approx. I went to our Church through the week and fortunately no one was in The Church. I made my vows in my own little ceremony alone.  I typed up a record or statement and our pp signed it, but only to witness my signature. The Home Mass was to renew life private vows and some 35years later.  As my SD said "Well, its certainly not a flash in the pan, is it?"  It was a stop and start journey for me since each time I had an episode of bipolar, the vows were automatically suspended (a condition of my private vows then).  I would renew them after the episode passed.  I could never predict what on earth would happen while an episode was in progress.

I have here somewhere in my files (some still boxed since shifting) the exact year, although I know it was the Feast of O.L. of The Rosary, 7th October.

 

 

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Another reason I wanted for a while to say the vow in the church is because I have no idea what day I made the vow. Maybe I wrote in my journal somewhere, I need to check. I like symbolism and stuff and if private vows are the only ones I'd do, it would be neat to have a special day as the day I vowed myself to Jesus. Maybe someday :) I don't even have a clue what month it was lol though I know I meant it. I do believe God heard it in any case but i loved the details of the Total Consecration and I'd like to do that for my vow, almost like a wedding day. But its up to my SD :) in my heart I have vowed my chastity.

When I first made private vows on Feast of Our Lady of The Rosary 1980 approx. I went to our Church through the week and fortunately no one was in The Church. I made my vows in my own little ceremony alone.  I typed up a record or statement and our pp signed it, but only to witness my signature. The Home Mass was to renew life private vows and some 35years later.  As my SD said "Well, its certainly not a flash in the pan, is it?"  It was a stop and start journey for me since each time I had an episode of bipolar, the vows were automatically suspended (a condition of my private vows then).  I would renew them after the episode passed.  I could never predict what on earth would happen while an episode was in progress.

I have here somewhere in my files (some still boxed since shifting) the exact year, although I know it was the Feast of O.L. of The Rosary, 7th October.

 

 

Good feast day! :) 

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