Jump to content

The strictest orders


Recommended Posts

I think we are treading on quicksand here regarding Carla and what she may or may not have said, or what was inferred from a conversation.  It's best we don't mention others without their permission :)

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 84
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Katie Bell

    14

  • Gabriela

    14

  • beatitude

    5

  • MarysLittleFlower

    4

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Physical penances certainly seem radical when we speak about them and they can be good for the spiritual life but if you are looking for real penance life usually provides what you need. I would

I have to be honest with you - this sends off big alarm bells for me.  Thinking in black and white is something that doesn't go well with community living.  It's something that most psychologists woul

Yes, I wasn't referring to silent acceptance of everything and especially not of big decisions.  I was thinking of more mundane conversations.  For example, one sister might insist that the temperatur

Posted Images

  • 4 weeks later...

Well, I was in the Trappists for about three months when it was fairly austere.  Honestly, though, the physical austerities (straw mattress, no meat, sleeping in a dormitory, etc) were easily taken in stride.  This was 1965. The psychological trials were far more difficult.  The silence, for example, meant that it was often impossible to explain oneself. or to exchange a friendly word or to have a friend.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, DominicanHeart said:

How strict would you say the Poor Clares are? They seem rather tame compared to what the Trappists and the Carthusians do.

This really depends on which Poor Clare's you're looking at. The Colletines are the 'strictest' and go bare foot. A good number of PCs do not eat meat year round and keep up the monastic fast. Most PCs keep the midnight rising. But again it's all individual. The Colletines have the chapter of faults but I wouldn't be surprised if the other groups do as well. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

and the experience/understanding of enclosure is different. PC's take enclosure as a vow, while the monastics vow "stability". PC's, at least in europe, often live in cities so they have limited space and have a parlour with a grille/screen to meet with people, while the monastic orders are usually found in more rural aerea's so they have way more space. Also, when they meet visitors/family, there is no grille or screen between them. 

and again, it is really important to remember that religious life is not a game in who can live the "hardest, strictest" life. it is about growing in love for God and neighbour. 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎24‎/‎03‎/‎2016‎ ‎11‎:‎55‎:‎16, josephine said:

and the experience/understanding of enclosure is different. PC's take enclosure as a vow, while the monastics vow "stability". PC's, at least in europe, often live in cities so they have limited space and have a parlour with a grille/screen to meet with people, while the monastic orders are usually found in more rural aerea's so they have way more space. Also, when they meet visitors/family, there is no grille or screen between them. 

and again, it is really important to remember that religious life is not a game in who can live the "hardest, strictest" life. it is about growing in love for God and neighbour. 

 

Poor Clares are monastics. I think you're talking about Benedictines. They have a vow of stability. While it's true that their monasteries do tend to be rural (historically they often worked the land) there are rural Poor Clare communities too, like the ones near the Northern Irish border; and urban Benedictines, like the Tyburn nuns in London. Most Benedictines are enclosed and a lot of them do have grilles.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

The only way to know most things is to observe the life of a community or institute and to read their constitutions (if possible). In many cases how they view enclosure and customs are outlined there.

If someone seeks out an austere life in a certain way then I think that's OK, if it's mature and considered with expertise help. I think, of course, God calls people to live out their vocation in various ways.

However, there are situations when alarm bells ring in my ears and I'd expect a person to be halted if they have ideas that aren't on the right track. I won't outline anything specific in terms of advice because I expect others will do that in RL if it goes to that.

I will say though that ideas about strictness and laxness of life are sometimes dealt with flippantly by people. My institute wouldn't be seen as 'strict' but the life is not easy at all. I have been upset, to the point of tears, to be sent back to an apostolate that I hate. Indeed, I was probably sent there for that exact reason, at least in part, as a means to grow. It's challenging and painful. We each find our pains in any sort of life.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Wise words in the last post. And in those seeing red flags. Reading the thread as a whole seems sometime gets forgotten that religious life is a giving to God not a "me" thing, or " I want"...  Occurs to me also that what each sees as austerity depends on your lifestyle. I live extremely simply, partly through a life of low income ( disabling illness and now old age) but mainly as I have all I truly need and so many other do not have the means to live. So any money I save by total simplicity goes to trusted ones working at the coal face of poverty who will not even live unless others care.  So I use as little heating as possible etc and take care to stay safe and healthy. The work of my hands is sold too. I truly would not live any other way. Deeply fulfilling. But not for everyone? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



It costs about $850 a year for Phatmass.com to survive–and we barely make it. If you’d like to help keep the Phorum alive, please consider a monthly gift.



×
×
  • Create New...