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AbigailGermaine

Patron Saint Question

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AbigailGermaine

Not sure where else to put this... 

I am, as some of you know, a convert. I was baptized as an infant in a mainline denomination with two OT names.  (Abigail Hester)

There is a saint Abigail, but if you look at the lives written of her Like this one, she was actually Irish and her baptismal name was Gobnait, translated into either Abigail or Deborah by no-Irish who couldn't pronounce the orignial, I assume, like a lot of other Irish. I find it hard to believe that she would have used the English version of her name that long ago... She would have only been interacting with other Irish. 

Hester is derived from Esther, and although Esther is a saint in the orthodox church, she's not exactly a saint in the Latin church... She doesn't have a feast day, etc. 

When we were confirmed into the Catholic church, our priest told us that our parish didn't give adult confirmands confirmation saints (I have no clue why not....:(

 

So..... Who is my patron saint? Do I just randomly pick one that I feel a relationship to? That seems awfully cheesy.... 

I really, really like Esther, but can I use her as my patron when she's not really a saint?

My SD suggested I use Our Lady Star of the Sea, because Esther means  star, but although I do really like that Marian title, it seems like a big stretch....

Any thoughts? 

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Sponsa-Christi

Your "name saint" doesn't have to have the exact same spelling as your legal name for them to count as your patron. It's fairly common to name kids after saints, but using a derivative or a nickname. E.g., Katelyn as a version of Catherine; or Austin for Augustine, etc.

In fact, St. Collete was named Collete after St. Nicholas (in French, Nicollete is the feminine version of Nicholas, and Collete is a short form of Nicollete). So even actual saints have been named with saint nicknames and translations. 

That being said, patron saints aren't an exact science, so there's nothing wrong with adopting a saint you just feel close to as your patron. 

But that being said, even if your name saint is kind of an unusual one, sometimes it can be good to get closer to the saint that Providence winds up picking for us. Meditating on their life and praying for their intercession might lead to spiritual insights you wouldn't have gotten from a saint who more naturally appeals to you. 

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BarbaraTherese

 

2 hours ago, AbigailGermaine said:

I really, really like Esther, but can I use her as my patron when she's not really a saint?

My SD suggested I use Our Lady Star of the Sea, because Esther means  star, but although I do really like that Marian title, it seems like a big stretch....

I think that Esther is really beautiful and you could use her.  The Book of Esther is in the Bible, which is written under the inspiration of The Holy Spirit.  Also, Esther has a connection with Our Lady, under her beautiful title of Star of The Sea.  Esther may not be a formally canonized saint, but her story is a Book of The Bible and a huge honor indeed.  She had great courage for one (we call it fortitude or strength of soul, which is one of the Seven Gifts of The Holy Spirit at Confirmation i.e. Wisdom, Understanding, Counsel,Knowledge, Fortitude, Piety and Fear of The Lord https://www.catholic.com/magazine/print-edition/the-seven-gifts-of-the-holy-spirit)

2 hours ago, Sponsa-Christi said:

get closer to the saint that Providence winds up picking for us. Meditating on their life and praying for their intercession might lead to spiritual insights you wouldn't have gotten from a saint who more naturally appeals to you. 

:like2:

_____________________________

My experience:     I picked St Therese of Lisieux as my Confirmation patron (I was confirmed at 12 years old).  I knew nothing about her nor her life and spirituality.  All I knew back then was that holy pictures depicted her as holding a crucifix with a bunch of roses and she had been a nun (years later I found out she was a Carmelite nun).  There was a big image of Therese on my classroom wall.  She also had a slight smile and that drew me to her too.  Other than that, I knew absolutely nothing about her, nothing.  Nor back then did I make any attempt to find out.

I was attracted to being a saint.  But it was all too jolly hard to me and absolutely beyond my capabilities........then I discovered St Therese of Lisieux and her spiritual theology.

My nana made me a beautiful frock for my First Communion.  For my Confirmation, my frock she made was totally plain, the absolute essence of plain, and I complained to nana about it.  Her reply was "The Holy Spirit will adorn it".

St Therese was to become a huge and lasting powerful influence in my life, a real epiphany in my spirituality, as was the Carmelite Order in my home city.  But it was all years after my Confirmation.  The story of how I 'accidentally' came across the autobiography of St Therese wa some years after my Confirmation is another story. Therese and The Holy Spirit, Our Lady, were to draw me into a close relationship with Jesus and The Father.  A Jesuit priest once asked me how I thought of The Three Persons of The -Blessed Trinity.  When I told him, he burst out laughing........ another story.  Also, I was accepted at almost16 yrs of age to enter Carmel when I was 21.   In my interview with Rev. Mother, she asked me what I liked about St Therese.  When I told her, she laughed too....that quite unique and beautiful gentle laugh of nuns like the tinkling of bells.  Another story again.

The reason I am not a nun today is that no way could I fit into the mould.......I was very much a square peg in a round hole.  Summarised: no religious life vocation and call.  I once apologised to Our Lady because I was more like her outspoken Son.

I think that Confirmation with prepartion can bring about a special closeness to The Holy Spirit and though I had absolutely no awareness of that at the time, I now feel that He guided me to St Therese.  I have never received a rose however.  That same year though not seemingly connected to my Confirmation, I had what was to me a miracle after praying to The Holy Spirit quite ardently and trustfully that God's Will be done for something I really needed (not just wanted). It seemed impossible and not only to me. Yet it came about.

If I had to do Confirmation again, I would pray to The Holy Spirit and Our Lady to guide me into a Confirmation patron as an influence for my whole life.  You will get a response but probably not instantly and perhaps in a roundabout sort of way.  A saint's name may come up and either with appeal or not.  I would pray about it and not be surprised if that saint in some way led me to another saint that did really appeal for some reason.  It's one of those times that one will know it when it happens and not before.

Short of it all, whatever name you do prayerfully choose, be trustfully confident that The Holy Spirit will be with you, because He will be with you and lead you to Jesus to The Glory of The Father.  My experience has been with very little sense or feeling, if that.  Faith has been my guide.  Faith in confident trust.  I don't feel it one little bit, I just believe it in one huge bit.

069c5d4e3e787211cb2121d2a703cc42.jpg

God writes very straight - sometimes in very crooked lines.

85b32967dd9291314d70e65413c81f11.jpg

Edited by BarbaraTherese

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BarbaraTherese
16 minutes ago, Lilllabettt said:

The Orthodox and Catholic Churches had all the saints in common prior to the schism. I think Esther counts. The Vatican newspaper says she is celebrated July 1st:

http://www.osservatoreromano.va/en/news/marrano-saint

I think the reason Esther was not included in the revision of the General Calendar post V2 was because it was felt not enough was known about her life - i.e. historical facts?  St Barbara and St Christopher both went the same way - with many more, including holy people of renown in the Old Testament.

I was surprised to read in your link that Esther is indeed St Esther with her Feast Day celebration 1st July. :nun2:Live and learn.

If those taken out of the General Calendar had been early canonized saints by The Church, I don't think that canonization can be taken from them?  They are still saint, just not included in the General Calendar?

Edited by BarbaraTherese

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Lilllabettt
32 minutes ago, BarbaraTherese said:

I think the reason Esther was not included in the revision of the General Calendar post V2 was because it was felt not enough was known about her life - i.e. historical facts?  St Barbara and St Christopher both went the same way - with many more, including holy people of renown in the Old Testament.

I was surprised to read in your link that Esther is indeed St Esther with her Feast Day celebration 1st July. :nun2:Live and learn.

If those taken out of the General Calendar had been early canonized saints by The Church, I don't think that canonization can be taken from them?  They are still saint, just not included in the General Calendar?

Right... pretty sure. I believe canonization is considered an infallible act. 

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