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Skin Care and Hygiene


InnerMonk

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I hope she is still here, I have eczema too and I remember the scaly skin in my high school years. 

I highly recommend trying a ice cube on the areas that itch. For me, lotions didn't cut the itchy skin. 

Check this video out, this is what stopped my eczema and my skin hasn't had flares for a few years now. 

https://youtu.be/GkB95RIpzv0

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:) I think the question you must ask your superiors will depend on whether you are looking for medical care for a skin condition - or a little cheap Shea butter ointment for cracked skin... or whether you want a home spa. ;) Ask.

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Posted (edited)

So I’ve finally asked my vocation director. He told me that it won’t be a problem at all if I used skin care products and he thinks it’s alright since I’m just taking good care of my skin health. 

I would however would need to pay for it on my own during postulancy and novitiate since the personal allowances start at simple profession. Which is totally fine with me. :)
 

In the end I’m glad I asked. Haha I wouldn’t have had the courage to ask my vocation director about it if it weren’t for the help of those who replied here. So thank you and God bless you all. :priest:

Edited by InnerMonk
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I don't think skin care is a luxury. I find myself thinking about it when sisters/nuns in very warm climates are out in the sun a lot and some older nuns have many age spots and moles. Sunscreen should be a no brainer type of thing, not a luxury. I would think too if you could use your own money from home or get gifts of it from family, it shouldn't be a big deal.

The Desert Nuns from Poor Clare's in AZ have a wish list on amazon and I've seen vitamins and oral care products and wide brim hats. Poverty doesn't mean we put ourselves at risk for disease that can cost much more than 10.00.

I understand it seeming not "prayerful" but it's not like you want calgon bath oil beads for soaking. ; ) 

I wonder at times when they show schedules for nuns, when do they shower and how do they have time in half an hour to dry hair or take care of personal things. I feel a lot of questions not about prayer and vocation are legitimate questions. I see some younger orders answer them online. Knowing how you do laundry or how often you can see a doctor or dentist if on your mind, might help you concentrate better on other things if just discussed and not a secret.

Edited by debc
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Most communities in the UK are pretty open to all those practical questions, which are important to ask even if they feel embarrassing to mention e.g. what menstrual supplies can you use? Most will answer: what you are using now is fine. These things need to be asked simply and answered simply! Otherwise they are liable to take up too much thinking/wondering time when discerning. One PC community simply has a cupboard where shampoo/deodorant/shower gel/toothpaste etc are available to take and use on the assumption that sisters are adults and could take what they needed when they had run out. Anything special needed permission eg for excess treatment but it was never refused, again on the grounds that sisters wouldn’t be asking if they didn’t need it and permission was asked primarily so the sister in charge of the shopping could add it to the list. Hope that helps! 

Sorry autocorrect sabotages me - I meant to write for excema treatment

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16 hours ago, Mhairi said:

 One PC community simply has a cupboard where shampoo/deodorant/shower gel/toothpaste etc are available to take and use on the assumption that sisters are adults and could take what they needed when they had run out.

I think this is wise. One community I knew even had over-the-counter drugs on offer. Yet I can remember (and wish I couldn't!) when some communities would not even want sisters to use tampons. When I entered the convent, though we did have individual rooms, the superiors were free to go through everyone's drawers and wardrobes. 

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