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Judging others


Wolf

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It's human nature to want to judge others - indeed, I think it's in our blood! Maybe there are reasons. We're hurt, outraged, offended. WE can't help our thoughts towards people but we don't have to speak them. We're especially wrong when we pronounce judgement. We can never be aware of others' situation, their mental life or the circumstances they are in at any particular time. That's why it's better - far better - to reserve judgement whenever we can. For all we know, our contribution could push them right over the edge. Words can never be unsaid. They may even be the last thing that someone ever hears in this world. 

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10 hours ago, Wolf said:

It's human nature to want to judge others - indeed, I think it's in our blood! Maybe there are reasons. We're hurt, outraged, offended. WE can't help our thoughts towards people but we don't have to speak them. We're especially wrong when we pronounce judgement. We can never be aware of others' situation, their mental life or the circumstances they are in at any particular time. That's why it's better - far better - to reserve judgement whenever we can. For all we know, our contribution could push them right over the edge. Words can never be unsaid. They may even be the last thing that someone ever hears in this world. 

I am rather biased....

but I really like what Rabbi Nachman of Breslov advised on this topic.

 

Quote

"Know! You need to judge every person favorably, even someone who is completely wicked, you need to search and find any little bit of good. By finding in him a little good and judging him favorably you actually bring him over to the side of merit and you can return him in teshuva" (Rabbi Nachman of Breslov, LM 282)

 

Of course Messiah Yeshua - Jesus did do even better........

or.....  was the Rabbi Nachman of Breslov assertion a fulfilment of....

"For the Father loveth the Son, and sheweth him all things which himself doth: and greater works than these will he shew him, that you may wonder."


Matthew 5:44
"But I say unto you, Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them which despitefully use you, and persecute you;"

Edited by Dennis Tate
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16 hours ago, Wolf said:

It's human nature to want to judge others - indeed, I think it's in our blood! Maybe there are reasons. We're hurt, outraged, offended. WE can't help our thoughts towards people but we don't have to speak them. We're especially wrong when we pronounce judgement. We can never be aware of others' situation, their mental life or the circumstances they are in at any particular time. That's why it's better - far better - to reserve judgement whenever we can. For all we know, our contribution could push them right over the edge. Words can never be unsaid. They may even be the last thing that someone ever hears in this world. 

It’s false to say we can never be aware of other peoples mental life or the circumstances they are in at any particular time.  People can reveal these things themselves about themselves and evidence can be gathered.  
 

From the Haydock Commentary on Matthew 7:1-2

 

Ver. 1.  Judge not,[1] or condemn not others rashly, that you may not be judged or condemned. Wi. — S. Jerom observes, Christ does not altogether forbid judging, but directs us how to judge. Where the thing does not regard us, we should not undertake to judge. Where it will bear a favourable interpretation, we should not condemn. Magistrates and superiors, whose office and duty require them to judge faults, and for their prevention to condemn and punish them, must be guided by evidence, and always lean towards the side of mercy, where there are mitigating circumstances. Barefaced vice and notorious sinners should be condemned and reprobated by all.

A. — In this place, nothing more is meant than that we should always interpret our neighbor's actions in the most favourable light. God permits us to judge of such actions as cannot be done with a right intention, as murder. As to indifferent actions, we must always judge in the most favourable sense. There are two things in which we must be particularly on our guard: 1. With what intention such an action was done. 2. Whether the person who appears wicked will not become good. S. Jerom.

 

Ver. 2. This rule, which God will infallibly follow, should put a check to the freedom with which we so frequently condemn our neighbour. A. — As we behave towards our neighbours, interpreting their actions with charitableness, and excusing their intentions with mildness; or, on the contrary, judging them with severity, and condemning them without pity; so shall we receive our judgment. M. — As the pardon of our sins is proportioned to the pardon we afford to others, so also will our judgment be proportioned to the judgment we pass on others. If our neighbour be surprised by sin, we must not reproach or confound him for it, but mildly admonish him. Correct your brother, not as an enemy, taking revenge, but as a physician, administering appropriate remedies, assisting him with prudent counsels, and strengthening him in the love of God. Chry. hom. xxiii.

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

Judging others constitutes making a determination regarding where someone stands morally in God's eyes.  That, we can never know.

It is not "judging others" to condemn their sinful actions or to offer fraternal correction.  And, in fact, it can often be a sin of omission not to.  We're likely all guilty of that...

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39 minutes ago, fides' Jack said:

Judging others constitutes making a determination regarding where someone stands morally in God's eyes.  That, we can never know.

It is not "judging others" to condemn their sinful actions or to offer fraternal correction.  And, in fact, it can often be a sin of omission not to.  We're likely all guilty of that...

In my opinion Rabbi Nachman of Breslov is one of the most amazing intellects of this last millennium.......

Some of his ideas on judging others sure remind me of Matthew chapters five, six and seven.   

 

Quote

"Know! You need to judge every person favorably, even someone who is completely wicked, you need to search and find any little bit of good. By finding in him a little good and judging him favorably you actually bring him over to the side of merit and you can return him in teshuva" (Rabbi Nachman of Breslov, LM 282)



Matthew 5:44
"But I say unto you, Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them which despitefully use you, and persecute you;"

 

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