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[quote name='maximillion' timestamp='1339413078' post='2443422']
Did they go nursing in that habit? That must have been some feat especially in Africa!!!!!
[/quote]






They and almost all the religious wore their full habits no mater what the job was, no matter what the weather was. That is why the Vatican back in the 1950's asked the sisters to start making the clothing more appropriate (not to get rid of the habit, but to adapt it to the work, weather, etc. of the ministries in which they were engaged.) Their website indicates they made minor changes in the 1950's, and then more after the changes after Vatican II....

Details are available on the arcives link I posted on the last page. Yes, indeed, they DID wear that habit (they only got permission to wear the 'cotton' habit about 20 or 30 years after they started in Africa. I don't want to think about what those first years would have been like.... :ohno: One would have HAD to be madly in love with God to do that.....

[center][img]http://scjmpakistan.org/Images/page3_pioneers.jpg[/img][/center]

[center][font=Verdana][color="#0000ff"][size=2][color="#008000"][font=Verdana][size=5]Arrival in Lahore[/size][/font][font=Verdana][size=5] - [/size][/font][size="4"][font=Verdana]28th October 1897[/font][/size][/color][/size][/color][/font][/center]

[font=Verdana][color="#0000ff"][size=2]In response to the call of the poor, victims of a severe famine, five pioneer Sisters of Charity from Belgium arrived at Lahore (now Pakistan) to rescue & care for the orphaned street children. Eventually, their services expanded to other areas, such as, formal education, health care and vocational training.[/size][/color][/font]
Here's a quote from the archives info:

[url="http://www.archief-museum.zvl.org/eng/hist_3.html"]http://www.archief-museum.zvl.org/eng/hist_3.html[/url] (pasted below from 3.4)


[img]http://www.archief-museum.zvl.org/Gifs/History/hist_3-4.jpg[/img]
The first contingent of missionaries shortly before their departure to the Congo at Vlissingen, 1891.

... On 8 December 1891, ten sisters embarked at Flushing for the Congo where they would be the first Catholic missionary women. Their principal task was the care and education of native children. By the end of the nineteenth century they already had six missionary posts in the Congo.

On a related note....

The page before that gives some very interesting detailsl of their daily life:

[url="http://www.archief-museum.zvl.org/eng/hist_2.html"]http://www.archief-museum.zvl.org/eng/hist_2.html[/url] (pasted below from 2.4)

[b] 2.4. The daily life and work of the sisters.[/b]

[img]http://www.archief-museum.zvl.org/Gifs/History/hist_2-4.jpg[/img]


"The hallmark, or distinctive characteristics of the Sisters of Charity are: exact observance of the Rule, gentleness in all their demeanour, evangelical simplicity, perfect union among themselves, charity towards every kind of unfortune, silence, complete submission of heart and mind, love of work, finally complete detachment from everything..." This 96th and last article of the Constitutions lists the four vows pronounced by the Sisters viz... poverty, chastity, obedience and the exercise of works of charity. Emphasis was at the same time laid on exact observance of the Rule. This comprised the Constitutions and Statutes, which determined the Sisters' lives right down to the smallest detail both on spiritual and material level.

The Rule followed by the Sisters was strict. Their life was one of work and prayer, which began at 4 o'clock in the morning. After three hours of prayer, daily Mass and Chapter, the Sisters were allowed a modest breakfast, after which the day's work began. This lasted till 6.30 p.m. and was interrupted only by examination of conscience, the hours of the Office and dinner followed by recreation. Once work was over a meditation was scheduled before the evening meal. After evening recreation Compline was said, proceeded by an examination of conscience. The Sisters went to bed a little after 8.00 p.m. A strict silence was observed in the convent except during the recreations. The Sisters were to a large extent cut off from the outside world; they were not allowed to leave the convent. An article of the Constitutions, however, refers to caring for the sick in their own homes but this was soon withdrawn. From this time on the sisters never left the house. Visits were rare and allowed only to parents and guardians, letters were read by the superior before being despatched or received; Outsiders were not allowed into the convent itself but only into the guest quarters. The vow of poverty was strictly observed. The sisters possessed nothing of their own and each year changed beds, books, crucifixes, and rosaries, in a word all they had at their disposal. The superiors lived like the Sisters and were specially warned of the dangers inherent in the management of goods and money. The Constitutions and Statues described in detail the physical aspects of the Sisters' lives: clothing, food, sleep, cleaning ... The sisters had to obey their Superior in all things but Triest also stipulated: "As the Sisters must be prompt to obey, so the Superiors will be slow and cautious in commanding, and will proceed rather by proposal than by order". Besides, all the Sisters without distinction had to obey the Rule.

The life of prayer was also closely regulated. The Rule laid down which Office had to be said, how much time must be devoted to meditation, to the examination of conscience and to personal prayer, the frequency of confession and communion, etc. Each year the Sisters made a ten-day retreat and in each house a novena was made to reflect on the local situation. Right from the beginning perpetual adoration in honour of the Sacred Heart of Jesus was organised in the Congregation. Triest himself outlined a system to ensure its survival. This adoration still goes on.

The organisation of the work within the convent entailed the creation of a whole series of posts. Besides the superior, there were counsellors, a zelatrice, a bursar, a hostess, a "mistress of the sick", a "mistress of the wardrobe" and a "portress". One or more sisters were assigned to the kitchen, waiting at table, work in the chapel, general cleaning and the laundry.

Of course the sisters had their work outside the enclosure, in the care of the sick or in teaching. There was a series of special rules to cover these services. The Nursing Sisters were expected to carry out all the tasks in the hospital or hospice and to care for all the patients with gentleness and charity. As a rule the care of the sick took precedence over attendance at Office. The "Mistress of the Sick" was in charge of the nurses and organised the work. She had to be strictly obeyed. No real training was provided, the sisters acquired their skills on the job.

In education there was a strong emphasis on unity among the Sisters themselves and between them and their pupils. The latter had to be treated with affection and charity. Corporal punishment was banned and so were other harsh punishments. Strict supervision of the pupils was expected always. The aim of these rules was to give the teaching sisters guidance in the exercise of their calling and to foster in their pupils orderliness, discipline, and a sense of the Divine. This tough life of work and prayer nevertheless exercised a strong attraction. The combination of a monastic discipline quasi-Bernardine with a life of service to the poor and sick in the tradition of St. Vincent, became for many the response to the call to a life consecrated to God and one's neighbour.

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[quote name='beatitude' timestamp='1339422430' post='2443454']
A friend of mine entered a Poor Clare Colettine community, and they have something that reminds me a little of a baby's bib as part of their habit. (This picture gives you [url="http://news.bbc.co.uk/media/images/38412000/jpg/_38412885_newnunsone300.jpg"]some idea[/url], although it's not exactly the same.) As soon as I saw that I knew that I could never enter such a community. My dinner would be all over it in about three seconds.
[/quote]

like this?[img]http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_zLrzq9DydMU/ReHLF17uPkI/AAAAAAAAAA8/E5IsT3RkOc8/s1600/pc11a.jpg[/img]

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Recent Vows ceremony for the Fraternite de Jerusalem - pics.

[url="http://jerusalem.cef.fr/diaporamas/120604-professions-magdala/"]http://jerusalem.cef.fr/diaporamas/120604-professions-magdala/[/url]

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[quote name='EmilyAnn' timestamp='1338821018' post='2440565']
[img]http://stmarysryde.org/gallery/1/photos/10.jpg[/img]
[/quote]

In a few weeks time hopefully I will be here!!! St. Cecilia's just sent me the dates they want me to come for a live-in!!!

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I think they were mentioned here before, but I just really like the Petites Soeurs de la Consolation (France) :blush: (I'm the 3th one from the left, top row by the way :whistle:)


[img]https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/536722_10150732439566740_674958302_n.jpg[/img]

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[img]http://www.jpgacademy.org/pictures/JCO_1724%20-%20Version%202.jpg[/img]

Anybody know who they are? These might be novices. They teach here: [url="http://www.jpgacademy.org/index.cfm?active=1"]http://www.jpgacademy.org/index.cfm?active=1[/url]

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Possibly the same sisters

[img]http://www.jpgacademy.org/pictures/JCO_1726%20-%20Version%202.jpg[/img]

The monogram on their scapular is the M and cross on the miraculous medal if I remember correctly.

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[quote name='the171' timestamp='1340138671' post='2446421']
[img]http://www.jpgacademy.org/pictures/JCO_1724%20-%20Version%202.jpg[/img]

Anybody know who they are? These might be novices. They teach here: [url="http://www.jpgacademy.org/index.cfm?active=1"]http://www.jpgacadem...ex.cfm?active=1[/url]
[/quote]
The school website calls them the Preachers of Christ and Mary, but I couldn't find a website for the order.

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Quaesivi Vultuum Tuum

[quote name='NonNovi' timestamp='1340138007' post='2446416']
I think they were mentioned here before, but I just really like the Petites Soeurs de la Consolation (France) :blush:
[/quote]

The complete name is Soeurs de la Consolation, du Sacré Coeur et de la Sainte Face (sisters of consolation, sacred heart and holy face). I think all the part of their name is beautiful...

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Strictlyinkblot

[quote name='emmaberry' timestamp='1339622079' post='2444383']
like this?[img]http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_zLrzq9DydMU/ReHLF17uPkI/AAAAAAAAAA8/E5IsT3RkOc8/s1600/pc11a.jpg[/img]
[/quote]

That looks like the Poor Clares in Galway, Ireland. They live on Nun island (no joke, honest)

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[quote name='Strictlyinkblot' timestamp='1340143122' post='2446447']
That looks like the Poor Clares in Galway, Ireland. They live on Nun island (no joke, honest)
[/quote]

Seriously? You have just made my week!

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