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  2. BarbTherese

    Private Vows in The Laity/Spirituality

    JMJ+ The world is in dire straights needing heartfelt prayer. And the temporal order is that order to which the Laity specifically is vocated (called) by The Lord. 60 Minutes Australia is a TV program I can usually respect. It goes to air every Sunday night in Adelaide Sth. Aust. usually. The following video is available on YouTube, no problems for me anyway, again it is an episode of 60 Minutes Australia. IT IS AGE RESTR ICTED. What is the primary reason for the strong and persistent, persevering, Ukrainian Resistance to Russian invasion. The Ukrainian President names it in one of the first questions asked of him. It is Unity (including Unity of) the Ukrainian soldiers! What can that say to me in the battle with evil in any of its' forms great or small. I/we, who are confirmed as a Soldier of Christ in The Sacrament of Confirmation, called to the Laity, the majority of us, and therefore the temporal order within creation and The Church? Words of Jesus: "GO OUT INTO THE WHOLE WORLD...........: The video from 60 Minutes Australia is an interview in Kiev with President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, the Ukrainian President. (Click on to "Watch on YouTube" ... the video is AGE RESTRICTED.
  3. BarbTherese

    Private Vows in The Laity/Spirituality

    catholice I love the way His Grace gives emphasis to Our Lady.
  4. BarbTherese

    Resentment

    My tuppence: St Teresa Benedicta of The Cross - Edith Stein. She wrote that she stopped believing in God and did not come into The Church until round about 30 years of age. Holiness, or wholeness if you like, should make us more human not less human; therefore, the journey of Faith and spirituality is a journey of the self. To know exactly who one is in reality and to work with that, not an imaginary self which I or we can project in company. Archbishop Fulton Sheen illustrates this with great clarity in Psychiatry and Psychology talks - I think that was the title anyway. St Teresa of Avila wrote about the foundational importance of humility to the journey towards Unity with God, Father Son and Holy Spirit - One God. Amen, perfected only in Heaven, the foundation of which is self-knowledge. There is no real spirituality and relationship without humility, genuine humility, she wrote - words with that understanding anyway. If one is resentful work with that and not push it away into the 'cellar of the mind' or the unconscious (A/b Fulton Sheen again). The following is a pretty good video, I thought - most especially the emphasis on prayer and the central position of The Cross. It is only 6:02 minutes long. Incidentally, I fail miserably rather often in humility and self-knowledge ... but not only -
  5. BarbTherese

    Questions about fostering devotion to saints

    "Him or Her" should have been written "him or her". No upper case. The Rest Jesus gratuitously gifts is indeed Profound and Divine Rest and yet it is also a Profound and Divine Restlessness. Therein a paradox and our spirituality is full of them. It is Jesus that unites the two polarities into a unity of Profound and Divine Rest that is yet Restlessness. The attraction to a saint or saints is a Gift from God. We strive to imitate their virtues and, I think, through that and our appeal or prayer to them, we are drawn into, by The Lord, a relationship with them. Our own special vocation or work (perhaps totally different to that of the saint or saints in question) will require the virtues we have been striving to imitate. Keep prayer as vital............Jesus will effect the rest for sure but in His Time. Patient and persevering Prayer.
  6. BarbTherese

    Questions about fostering devotion to saints

    St Benedicta of The Cross Edith Stein OCD, Carmelite nun, wrote that the search for Truth is indeed the search for God (God IS Love and He is Truth, the Ultimate Truth). She also wrote that the search for Truth/God is, of itself, a prayer or a relationship with God. What grows out of that prayerful relationship is the embrace and awareness that He was always there first. The only reason a person searches for Truth/God is because God has already found/within the person and calls to Him or Her: "Come to Me all you who labour and are burdened, and I will give you Rest". Well said.
  7. BarbTherese

    THE ASSUMPTION OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY

    JMJ+ For me, it is simply that Jesus took human flesh in the womb of Mary and so when His Body (Flesh) and Soul ascended into Heaven without undergoing any sort of decay, then the same happened to His Mother - flesh with (same as or united to) His Flesh. The Father, through The Holy Spirit, would not permit the Flesh of His Son to know decay as in the normal course of death; therefore, indeed the human flesh of The Mother of Jesus was not to know decay either. I needed an 'explanation' of The Assumption of Our Lady that an ordinary everyday person could grasp. We MUST get The Gospel etc. into the vernacular. As Archbishop Fulton Sheen commented in one of his talks, it is up to The Church to go out to others***, rather than others must come in. The Assumption is my mother's birth date. When I was a child, I would say that when Our Lady went up, my Mum came down Mum died and went to Heaven on Palm Sunday, the beginning of Holy Week - the day Jesus was hailed victorious into Jerusalem on a humble little donkey. Archbishop Fulton Sheen in one of his talks gives a lovely little mythical anecdote about that little very humble donkey. ___________________ *** The Mass comes from the noun "missa" or the verb "missio" (my Latin remains absolutely pathetic!): ........... "After the blessing, the deacon dismisses the people. In fact, the dismissal gives the liturgy its name. The word "Mass" comes from the Latin word, " Missa." At one time, the people were dismissed with the words " Ite, missa est," meaning "Go, you are sent. The word " Missa" comes from the word " missio," the root of the English word "mission." The liturgy does not simply come to an end. Those assembled are sent forth to bring the fruits of the Eucharist to the world." https://www.usccb.org/offices/public-affairs/structure-and-meaning-mass Are we a Missionary Church sent forth by Jesus into the world, or are we not? It is good, methinks, almost essential, methinks again, to consider the missionary works and wanderings, the teaching or conversion mode, of St Paul as a guidepost to missionary missions (sent forth) or ministries, activity, in the world today. And the Laity is primarily sent to the temporal order of creation. Nor does The Lord send us forth 'empty handed' as it were. As Laity, He specifically blesses us with all necessary to go forth and "bear fruit that will last/remain" https://www.vatican.va/archive/hist_councils/ii_vatican_council/documents/vat-ii_decree_19651118_apostolicam-actuositatem_en.html (Apostolate of The Laity) And see: https://www.usccb.org/committees/laity-marriage-family-life-youth/church-teaching-laity The above indicates the foundational, central and vital importance of valid Holy Communion. In The Holy Mass, we confess our sinfulness and beg to be pardoned and then we 'sing', or indeed sing, the Praises of The Lord and all He has done for us.
  8. little2add

    Crucifix

    that's it Olive wood, not dogwood. hand made olive wood from the holy land
  9. BarbTherese

    Crucifix

    Is the sand taken from Jerusalem? If not, what is the identity of the sand or gravel?
  10. Yesterday
  11. Sponsa-Christi

    Consecrated virginity question

    @ShelbyHi! As other posters have said, I am a consecrated virgin myself. Discerning consecrated virginity is just as much of a substantial process as discerning religious life. So the first step should really be learning about the spirituality and charism of this vocation, as well as the role of consecrated virginity in the wider Church. Some good places to start are the Rite of Consecration to a Life of Virginity itself, and also the Vatican document Ecclesiae Sponsae Imago. (And, shameless plug, I also write a blog about consecrated virginity: http://sponsa-christi.blogspot.com/ ) You need to discern with your spiritual director whether you feel truly feel called to consecrated virginity and all this vocation entails, before you approach your bishop. At that point, it's up to the bishop and the people he appoints to assist him to co-discern whether you are called to this. Then there is supposed to be 3 - 5 years of formation before you can be consecrated. The details of the actual consecration ceremony are pretty much the *LAST* thing you should be worried about when you're discerning. In some dioceses the bishop makes the choice about where it will be and/or on what date; in other dioceses the candidates have more of a say. The Rite of Consecration tells us that ordinarily consecrations should actually be celebrated in the cathedral, although sometimes it can be held at a parish if there are good pastoral reasons. If you do become a consecrated virgin, this is a public vocation and people are supposed to know about it. Dealing with the lived reality of misunderstandings, etc. is just part of life for most consecrated virgins right now. But if you are really called to this life, you are given the grace to deal with this, often in spiritually fruitful ways. For instance, explain our vocation to someone who isn't familiar with it can be a moment of evangelization. If you feel attracted to the spirituality of consecrated virginity but don't feel called to all the obligations--e.g., the very public witness, among other things--that comes with this vocation, perhaps you can talk to your SD about making a simple private vow.
  12. Here at Pecos Benedictine Monastery, we had a Solemn Profession. we also have a new Postulant.
  13. gloriana35

    Consecrated virginity question

    SponsaChristi can give you some personal reflections, since she is a consecrated virgin. I'm urban - I can only imagine living in such a small place. (Some people treat consecrated life, in any form - and please, no-one quote, 'Take my life and let it be...", since I mean vowed evangelical counsels - as something as shocking as an addiction to opium... in fact, some might more easily 'forgive' the opium.) I was a late vocation for the time, and will celebrate my 40th anniversary of vows in December - I don't want you to know the nonsense I heard, then or now (priests and religious sometimes were the worst), but, sad but true, lots of people love to spoil everything. I agree with Grace that, for now, you need to just embark on discernment and direction. (In consecrated life, so little understood, there are many times one with my years of experience says, outwardly, '...interesting,' when, inwardly, I'm thinking, "you try to battle with me about my religious commitment again and I'll kick you square in the arsenal." Every blessing!
  14. Sister Mary Agnes made her first vows as a Daughter of the Virgin Mother in Charlotte NC yesterday. If you look on the St Joseph College Seminary facebook page you can see the lovely photos. Deo gratias!
  15. Hna.Caridad

    2022 Entrances, Vows and Ordinations

    Sr. Maria Faustina Bema professed temporary vows and Sisters Mary Elizabeth Jerry and Alma Marie Orji professed perpetual vows yesterday with the Sisters of the Holy Family in New Orleans.
  16. Tessa

    Barriers to Confession

    Sometimes thinking about the grace and mercy of Christ and meditating on this is a beautiful way to approach Confession when you feel scared or afraid or dejected. It is always more about His redeeming love than your sinfulness. I will pray for you! Maybe too ask St John Vianney to intercede for you- he was known for his goodness as a confessor. Oh and if you're afraid of not knowing what to say or the formula or when you say which responses or how to begin at confession, just tell the priest that you might need some guidance or help! Or read this little booklet from YouCat- especially page 7. (This is very basic but it's helpful I think) https://assets.ctfassets.net/e1rvcpbj76la/35bY5Er2atkUj9t2kcbUJn/70b4199eaa6a0a6941605d489f2f5045/Conf-handbook-material-eng-11.pdf
  17. I think GraceUK is right. It's takes a while to discern a vocation to consecrated virginity and I don't know how far you are along in the process, but it is good sometimes to keep your counsel and to have conviction about your decision before hearing everyone else's opinions too- aside from trusted friends and a spiritual director or someone who has walked that same path. You will probably have to discern the call yourself as to where would be appropriate for the consecration or where the bishop would want it- what it might mean to those around you to see your witness or how it might impact them for the good. A call to more for others too, because each of our vocations sanctifies those around us as well.
  18. GraceUk

    Consecrated virginity question

    I dont think you need to tell anybody anything at this stage except your spiritual director. There is no reason as far as I can see that the whole town needs to know that you are discerning whether this is the right path for you.
  19. Anomaly

    Crucifix

    They sell them on Amazon. $30. Search “souvenir crucifix with sand”.
  20. Hi! Sorry that it sounds all over the place! I'm just starting to think of consecrated virginity, but knowing everyone in my town, I have considered that people here, like to gossip. My town (with population of 750 ) can spread rumors quickly, and people are opinionated about anything under the sun. Everyone is familiar what a Priest or Bishop looks like, but nobody is familiar with consecrated virgins, or the fact we are all brides of Christ as Christians. But, inside! I want to be recognized in the Catholic Church as a consecrated virgin. I think it's a wonderful and beautiful vocation and I feel called. But, why do people have to ruin things? I was wondering if you have any advice for me. 1. Should I be brave and have it in my Parish? 2. Ask to have in the Diocese but out of town? 3. Pick another vocation? And, for clarity... The town doesn't know I want to be a consecrated virgin. Not yet anyway.
  21. Last week
  22. little2add

    Crucifix

    I believe the crucifix is made from the dogwood tree. The legend goes like this: In Jesus’ time, dogwood trees grew in Jerusalem. Then, dogwoods were tall, large, and similar to oak trees in strength. Because of its mightiness, the tree was chopped down and made into the cross Jesus was crucified upon.
  23. little2add

    Crucifix

    I found this crucifix that has four glass vials, one each at the points of the cross, filled with what looks like gravel or sand. The back is stamped Jerusalem and marked with the stations of the cross (I think) Can anyone tell me the history of this item?
  24. BarbTherese

    Private Vows in The Laity/Spirituality

    JMJ+ Four words I can skim over without much thought: IN THE NAME OF,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, i hae sent a text to my IT guy about not being able to connect to big screen. He will reply when he can. So I am typing nearly blind as best I can. The spiritual life is indeed the greatest adventure I have ever lived for sure: \
  25. sr.christinaosf

    Thoughts from a Franciscan Sister

    http://ndfranciscans.org/fiat/blessed-on-my-home-visit
  26. little2add

    THE ASSUMPTION OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY

    Prayer for the Assumption of Mary Father in heaven, all creation rightly gives you praise, for all life and all holiness come from you. In the plan of your wisdom she who bore the Christ in her womb was raised body and soul in glory to be with him in heaven. May we follow her example in reflecting your holiness and join in her hymn of endless love and praise. We ask this through Christ our Lord. Amen.
  27. The Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary proclaims that at the end of her earthly life Our Lady was taken to the glory of heaven. What is the evidence for this doctrine and why does the Church teach it? Although there is no direct description of the end of Mary’s life in the New Testament, it is significant that no early tradition sprang up or remain to us reverencing a grave or the location of her physical relics. Unlike every other major figure in the Apostolic period. There must, therefore, have been something particular about the end of Our Lady’s life that meant this didn’t happen. Traditions circulated as early as the 2nd and 3rd centuries that Mary was taken to God at the end of her earthly life. This means it is perfectly reasonable to assume the community memory there was that she was neither buried nor dead like other Christians, but rather was graced with some sort of immediate experience of heaven. From the 4th century onwards a number of written texts mention Mary’s Assumption, such as the Dormition of Mary (attributed to the Apostle John). The one thing that seems to characterise all evidence concerning early speculation about Mary is an unanimity from the very earliest times, in both written, and oral evidence that Mary was not to be found buried anywhere, that no place claims her remains or a story of her death and permanent burial. The idea that Mary had been taken into heaven clearly had wide early Christian credence even if it had not been crystallised as a universally defined doctrine. It is important to remember that although the New Testament contains no direct description of the end of Mary’s life, there is much scriptural evidence of a figurative nature that points to the truth of this doctrine. The most important evidence of this kind comes from the Book of Revelation. The Heavenly Woman described in Chapter 12 of that book clearly has a representative significance. She is described as in heaven, “clothed with the sun, with the moon under her feet and on her head a crown of twelve stars.” Through her childbearing, she defeats the dragon representing evil, and gives birth to a son “who was to rule the nations.” It is very difficult indeed to imagine some reference to Mary is not intended by John of Patmos in his description of this heavenly woman and her kingly son. This Mary figure in Rev 12 is both exalted in heaven and taken to a place of safety because of her role in our salvation. It is easy to see how Christians from the earliest times saw this passage as evidence Mary was assumed into heaven. It is also important to consider why the Assumption is important and what it teaches us both about Our Lady and our salvation. The Assumption is both a natural outworking of truths at the heart of the Gospel and a logical consequence of what the church has always taught about Mary’s role. It is a rational and coherent assertion to make about Our Lady. Our Lady was both the source and location of our salvation’s dawn, but also the first amongst the redeemed. Because God had taken flesh in her, he would not let her know decay and death, and so brought her body and soul into the glory of heaven. In other words, though exalted as the Mother of God, she is saved just as much through her Son’s death and resurrection as we are. She shares now in the same glory we hope to be clothed with when we die. From ancient times the Church has proclaimed lex orendi, lex credendi (the law of prayer is the law of belief). The feast of the Assumption, in its evolution from the common belief of the faithful, as represented by the proliferation of apocryphal literature to a dogma of the Church, is a manifestation of this time-honoured dictum. Mary’s role as the Mother of God and the dignity of her life make the Assumption her privilege as she continues to serve as the perfect model of discipleship for all the faithful.
  28. debc

    Barriers to Confession

    When I was away for a while a Dominican priest told me despair and worry, the devil loves. He had me promise (slipped once) to never have fear or being uncomfortable keep me away. I would in the past, know a church near me had 11:15 to 12 confessions on Saturday and make an appt in my head. I wont lie, some Saturday's I planned to go got too busy but it helped to make it part of my day. I got to know what priests were kind and helpful and didn't let one or two who weren't as good at counsel or forgiveness, deter me. It had a friend of mine keep away decades ago being traumatized by a confession and that is a sin too I think, you never have a repentant soul feel less than when it took so long and it was so hard to go. Honest yes, but not mean. It was about abortion and I know it weighed heavily on her and felt terrible, unlike today, the healing couldn't begin. I like not seeing the priest, I go to different churches and they all have that option but when I was away a very long time and knew I'd be a while, I made an appt with a priest not in my parish and met him in the rectory and over the kitchen table, poured out my heart. Unconventional maybe but it was how I was guided back. I needed that connection then and to know someone wasn't outside thinking "This is taking a while". Just tell yourself, I am going to do this "fill in a day" Make an appt if you think you need more time, don't let so many human emotions keep you away. I am going to do this for next weekend. No sin is too much, don't make pride keep you away from feeling so good when you leave.
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