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  2. Luigi

    Covid-19

    Monk Shaves Beard Off due to Covid-19 (so you know things must be getting serious)...
  3. Pax17

    Private Vows and The Vatican

    :Prayers:
  4. Yesterday
  5. little2add

    Laughter is good medicine.....

    Baby boom 2020
  6. BarbaraTherese

    Private Vows and The Vatican

    I came across what appears below for two only and quite some years back now: I am really grappling with a nasty bipolar episode just now making concentration and memory (and more) not so good at all. I am hoping there will be no posts other than mine therefore. I did want to put it in anyway. It is 6.30am almost and I have not slept all night. But am in contact with my GP and psychiatrist. So far, so good. Deo Gratius.
  7. Faustina86

    The Unknown Vocation: Secular Institutes

    A recent article highlighting “Consecrated Secularity”. Personal quotes from members of several Secular Institutes: Apostolic Oblates, Caritas Christi, DeSales Secular Institute and Schoenstatt Sisters of Mary. Feb. 3 2020 https://www.rcbo.org/community-story/lives-of-holiness/
  8. Another online thing I found; the Franciscan Sisters of Penance of the Sorrowful Mother (I subscribe to their newsletter) talked about a virtual Lenten retreat they have, if anyone is interested. It will be available "indefinitely", apparently, and you can divide it up however you wish to fit your schedule! https://www.franciscansisterstor.org/events/lenten-retreat-2020
  9. Faustina86

    The Unknown Vocation: Secular Institutes

    Hi OneHeart, You have a lot of good questions and there’s a lot to unpack here, I will try to answer some of this to the best of my ability. ”Were these (third order) institutions the old ways that the church offered to people who felt called to consecration but not to religious community,but that that is getting lost in the structure of the Church now?” No, to the best of my knowledge “Third Orders” were never never a form of what’s now called “Consecrated Life”. They were a way for the laity to practice a religious spirituality and rule life in their vocation as married or single. It was an “addition” to their already vocation. We are all called to holiness and our vocation is what helps achieve holiness and The Church gives us “means” to grow in holiness. Third Orders are a vocation but they are not a “main” vocation: marriage or religious/Consecrated Life or single life. “And are "secular Institutes" popping up to fill the need (nature abhors a vacuum) for a secular consecration?” Secular Institutes are in themselves their own unique vocation fashioned by Holy Spirit and are not in anyway an updated form of Third Orders. Secular institutes were formally recognized by The Church as form of Consecrated Life in 1947 but their roots go back much further than that- The Company of St. Ursula, founded by St. Angela Merici in 1535- women dedicated to Christ living in the world-papal recognition in 1546. Our purpose as members of Secular Institutes is to sanctify the world within by living in the heart of it among everyone else. “If I make vows in OCDS, how am I not Consecrated?” The simplest answer is no because the “promises” made in a Third Order are in spirit of the Evangelical Counsels and not material. Even the “vow” of chastity in OCDS does not change your state in life- you could still could get married one day. Secular institutes although not Religious Institutes do involve a full profession of the evangelical counsels. They make a total donation of self to God in service of The Church and take a vow of celibate-chastity. I wanted to take the time to type this out and answer some your questions. But it sounds like you have a lot of discerning to do and how you might be called to give yourself totally to God. All forms of Consecrated Life are beautifully unique and none of them are less than each other. I have a genuine respect for consecrated virgins who are the first brides of Christ. And religious who give up normal life to follow a strict self giving life in community. I suggest you continue researching the different forms and even consider taking a “private” vow if God isn’t calling you to these forms consecrated life. There is a book that talks specifically about “dedicated singleness” which is not a form of consecrated life but it is a vocation, the book is called: “single for a greater purpose” The quote on the bottom is from an exhortation by St. Pope JPII called “Vita Consecrata” which talks about consecrated life, the different forms and their purpose in the church in the world. If you want to read the full thing here’s the link: http://www.vatican.va/content/john-paul-ii/en/apost_exhortations/documents/hf_jp-ii_exh_25031996_vita-consecrata.html Secular Institutes: The Holy Spirit, who wondrously fashions the variety of charisms, has given rise in our time to new expressions of consecrated life, which appear as a providential response to the new needs encountered by the Church today as she carries out her mission in the world. One thinks in the first place of members of Secular Institutes seeking to live out their consecration to God in the world through the profession of the evangelical counsels in the midst of temporal realities; they wish in this way to be a leaven of wisdom and a witness of grace within cultural, economic and political life. Through their own specific blending of presence in the world and consecration, they seek to make present in society the newness and power of Christ's Kingdom, striving to transfigure the world from within by the power of the Beatitudes. In this way, while they belong completely to God and are thus fully consecrated to his service, their activity in the ordinary life of the world contributes, by the power of the Spirit, to shedding the light of the Gospel on temporal realities. Secular Institutes, each in accordance with its specific nature, thus help to ensure that the Church has an effective presence in society. valuable role is also played by Clerical Secular Institutes, in which priests who belong to the diocesan clergy, even when some of them are recognized as being incardinated in the Institute, consecrate themselves to Christ through the practice of the evangelical counsels in accordance with a specific charism. They discover in the spiritual riches of the Institute to which they belong great help for living more deeply the spirituality proper to the priesthood and thus they are enabled to be a leaven of communion and apostolic generosity among their fellow clergy. —St. Pope John Paul II: Vita Consecrata Anyway, praying for your discernment. I hope I at least answered some of your questions.
  10. Lea

    Catholic Tan Books

    I would suggest a local bookstore instead of a tax-avoiding mega company denying their employees' fundamental rights. Even under Corona lockdown you usually can order books there and support smaller businesses. Just my two cents.
  11. Faustina86

    The Unknown Vocation: Secular Institutes

    Thank you Beatitude, I think you explained the difference simply and to the point because I can see how can be confusing.
  12. beatitude

    The Unknown Vocation: Secular Institutes

    Married people can become members of the OCDS. (Couples are called to live chastely too, which in their case would mean being faithful to their spouses.) Marriage would be their vocation, and membership of the OCDS would be an expression of their spirituality, whereas members of secular institutes have received a call to live in celibacy. The consecrated single life is their vocation.
  13. Personal Reflection of Friar Nathaniel (May, 2019) The joy of seeing someone decide to come back to Holy Confession From April 23 to April 29, I traveled by foot and hitchhiking from Houma (LA) to Mexico City according to Jesus’ instructions and our community’s charism: “Take nothing for the journey, neither walking stick, nor sack, nor food, nor money, and let no one take a second tunic” (Luke 9:3 NABRE). I met many different people who helped me along this journey, but what they had all in common was the altruism that they concretely showed through helping me. In their genuine generosity I experienced the infinite providence of God who never forsakes those who seek Him (cf. Psalm 9:11). One of the encounters that struck me most happened along the way to the Mexican city Santiago de Querétaro. There, a man gave me a ride, where we began to speak about languages, given that he works in an Italian company found also in Mexico. He therefore had learned some Italian words, so we shared different words in Italian, in English and in French, but the dialogue was mainly in Spanish. He was a man who liked to joke, so we took the time to laugh for a while. Afterward, he explained to me that his wife, whom he had married in the Catholic Church, after many years, left him to live with another man. He also said that she does not help him take care of their son who was about 20 years old. Consequently, he was raising his son alone, but was not complaining and seemed to accept this suffering with a certain serenity. He told me that he was not in any other relationship... (to read the rest of his reflection, please click HERE )
  14. OneHeart

    The Unknown Vocation: Secular Institutes

    If consecration is expressed by profession of the Evangelical council's, and in OCDS one can make a vow to follow the Evangelical council's, then how is this not a consecration, the same as in a secular institute. Indeed, I have even heard the third order referred to as a secular "institution" in the Church. How are these third orders not the original secular institutes? I am so confused. My OCDS president said that "the vows are really no different than the promises" and I wonder if things have gotten so watered down in the third order as to cause confusion. Were these (third order) institutions the old ways that the church offered to people who felt called to consecration but not to religious community,but that that is getting lost in the structure of the Church now? And are "secular Institutes" popping up to fill the need (nature abhors a vacuum) for a secular consecration? If I make vows in OCDS, how am I not consecrated? This is not simply an academic question. I'm really trying to discern where God is calling me to be. In prayer, I hear the Lord saying "give yourself to me." And "consecration". That's what I'm trying to follow. I visited a community and we all liked each other and I almost entered, because I concluded that a community is the usual, and sensible, place to become and live consecrated. But circumstances seem to prevent that now, and I've realized that "community" is something that *I've* added to "consecration" and so maybe that's not what God is saying - it's my own interpretation. So I'm trying to find "consecrations" without "community". I think there is OCDS, or third orders, secular institutes, had bring a hermit. The later seems absurd since I have no experience in religious life and that's kinda recommended for someone who wants to be a hermit. Soon left with third orders and secular institutes. I think the Lord wants me to be consecrated, and live a life of prayer and penance. That's what I'm hearing from prayer. I'm doing the best I can right now, but where is consecration? How do I give myself in a concretized way to Him? That's what He is asking, I think. And yes, I know I already have baptism, and I also know I can offer myself to Him individually and I do that as best I can on a daily basis. But I think it needs to be concretized. Poverty, Chastity and Obedience. Concretely. That's why I'm asking these questions. Thanks.
  15. BarbaraTherese

    Is praying for height a legitimate practice.

    I think God wants to hear all our petitions no matter how small they seem to us. In fact, the smaller and say unworthy we feel the prayer might be, the more The Lord loves to hear from us - it witneses that His Heart and Loving Caring is closed to no person and not for any reason whatsoever....and a vitally important witness.. i.e. I am the weak and useless servant with a very small request in the big picture of world troubles especially in my day, but I trust You and know You Care and Love me the more for my littleness and request that makes me blush to ask it. The Humility of God can blow you right over. God bless your own humility, Count Claydus, reflecting His Own Heart. I hope The Good Lord will favourably hear your prayer. And He will, but perhaps the response might not be the one you are hoping for. It will be a blessing on you and us all nonetheless. God always acts in the interests of the salvation of all mankind. A good read (heavy going in places!) : https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/221103.The_Humility_of_God ."Here as in her previous work, Sister Ilia builds on her outstanding command of the scholarship about the work of Bonaventure which has developed so remarkably in the twentieth century. Together with this she brings her personal knowledge and experience of contemporary scientific understandings of the cosmos. In a style that is preeminently readable, she offers insights into issues and problems that are widespread in the present period of Christian history. Sister Ilia has taken on these monumental issues and has opened insights, which can be helpful to many who take their Christian faith seriously."—from the Preface by Zachary Hayes, O.F.M. The Humility of God: A Franciscan Perspective is the first extensive treatment of a Franciscan theology of divine humility. Through the lens of St. Bonaventure's theology, Ilia Delio searches for God today "in a fast-paced, scientific world that in many ways views God as an unnecessary hypothesis." Using Bonaventure's Christ-centered mysticism, Ilia Delio illustrates God's humility and his relationship to the world, while at the same time tackling these tough questions: How can a God of love exist in such a time of turmoil and suffering? How can a well-educated Christian reconcile contemporary science with the central symbols of his or her faith?
  16. BarbaraTherese

    Laughter is good medicine.....

    I always liked Queen and thought Freddie Mercury was truly gifted, may he ever rest in Peace. Catcha on the other side, Freddie - thank you for all you left with us, including music readily converted to the coronavirus pandemic.
  17. Norseman82

    Laughter is good medicine.....

  18. BarbaraTherese

    Laughter is good medicine.....

    There is something quite prophetic in the above.
  19. Luigi

    Come & See Opporunties

    JUL18 Come and See Day Sat 8 AM PDT Dominican Nuns at Corpus Christi Monastery, Menlo Park, CA https://www.facebook.com/Dominican.Nuns.Menlo/
  20. DameAgnes

    2020 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    Sisters of Charity of Our Lady, Mother of the Church: https://www.sistersofcharity.com/congratulations-sisters/
  21. Last week
  22. Norseman82

    Fr. Frank Pavone's Satanic Beatitudes

    Please look into the person who made the blog entry that you linked to. His previous post lambasted Bishop Paprocki, and in it made a comment regarding people in same-sex marriage "Assumingfor the sake of argument they had something to repent for, how would he even know?" So, can this blogger's words be trusted?
  23. Norseman82

    "Women belong in the kitchen... "

    That's how I paid my way through college.
  24. Norseman82

    Catholic Tan Books

    Would you suggest shopping for Catholic books on Amazon, then?
  25. Not A Mallard

    Greetings, Plebs

    I just don't like the college environment; doing my schoolwork online at home is much more peaceful.
  26. Right, but the Elysburg monastery might be able to help with that.
  27. Lilllabettt

    Greetings, Plebs

    I feel you as I'm working from home. However isn't it harder to get library books and ish? Or, is it there are fewer distractions? Where do you go if you dont mind me asking.
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