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  2. Peace

    Will you get the vaccine?

    Oh but it is Merecedes. It is! All anti-vaxxers should Venmo any excess savings to Peace immediately as reparations.
  3. Sr. Renee goes a bit deeper into Pope's Francis' letter. "To discern your personal vocation, you have to realize it is a calling from a friend, Who is Jesus...." https://fscc-calledtobe.org/2021/10/17/franciscan-sister-renee-mirkes-on-pope-francis-christus-vivit/
  4. Today
  5. DameAgnes

    2021 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    2 new Postulants for the Apostles of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Long time PMer's will recognize "Shortnun" in one of the pics. She's fully professed, now. https://www.facebook.com/ascjus/posts/4479131488841968 More good news, there:
  6. FutureMoniale

    Discerning without parents' support

    I actually am already a European (German) citizen, my parents are immigrants and the plan was always for me to go back there after college so that I can go to university and move there. That is one of the reasons why I looked at orders there, because even if I discern out, practically all of my family is in France or Germany and it would not be hard for me to continue studying or working, whereas I do not want to spend a life in my country here, especially once my parents retire and I do not depend on them anymore. Their main concern is me being far away, not finances or immigration, which is still valid but much more easily dealt with than bureaucracy. I also have visited cloistered communities here, as much as possible, and I have gone on retreats (some discernment, some silent). I am very much open to wherever God calls me, even if it's to an order that I may find less interesting or "exotic". I am in touch with several communities here, mostly in friendly sisterly correspondence and not serious discernment, since many of the Sisters are praying for me and write to me when they can. Of course, with the current situation, it is hard to visit further than the monasteries right nearby, but I do my best to participate in virtual retreats and be active. The issue with school is that, yes, I will likely incur some debt by studying, and also that it is a dangerous environment spiritually. My faith is seen as a bad thing by many people and I have had to hide it or even compromise it in order to pass certain classes. I have spoken about this with my spiritual director and he is definitely helping me out, but, ultimately, I am very unhappy and I cannot imagine continuing for another 3 years in this environment. Of course, I understand that there is a chance of leaving the monastery after entering, and I would never want to be rash and just abandon all my life's plans and savings on a whim, but I also have a very good support system in place and I feel comfortable with the idea of returning to study if I need to leave, especially since university would be free in Germany. I am definitely considering what my parents said, too. I am not applying to enter, not even close. I am in discernment, with my spiritual director and the prioress, and I am not going to rush this decision. If we all decide after my visit that I should enter sooner rather than later, then I will follow that. If I am told to try elsewhere or to cease discernment, then that is the will of God and I will follow it. I know I'm young and perhaps I seem rash, but I do not feel like I need to justify where I am in discernment. Ultimately, I am just trying to follow Jesus without fear. All that to say, I have considered what you mentioned and I think they are all very valid points. I will be praying with them in the coming days and I will bring them up with my spiritual director next week. Thank you so much for praying for me, too, there is nothing I need more than grace and prayer!
  7. GraceUk

    Discerning without parents' support

    I think you should make a retreat with a community nearer to home. Quite a few orders do those discernment/retreat weekends in a general way and not just aimed at people who are interested in their particular community. If you haven't even visited this community and they have no website the chances are it might not be what you are expecting. Also moving countries is a very big deal as regards visas, immigration rules and so on.
  8. Sponsa-Christi

    Discerning without parents' support

    One more thought...it's actually rather impressive to me that non-Catholic parents are as relatively ok with the idea of discernment as yours seem to be from your description here (in terms of not being angry, proposing not unreasonable compromises, etc.) Sometimes God does call us to dramatic sacrifices and radical breaks with family and homeland; but I think just as if not more often He calls us to follow Him while being as kind and gentle as possible to those who love us and who may be on their own journey of conversation. So honestly, if I were in your shoes I would try very hard to have at least that last Christmas together--it would probably be better for your parents' own spiritual development if they could come to see your vocation as a bittersweet but beautiful journey grounded in love; as opposed to a dynamic where God asked you to suddenly forsake your own parents as though they were merely a worldly distraction.
  9. Sponsa-Christi

    Discerning without parents' support

    Ultimately, you following God's will for your life will be for your good and everyone else's--including your parents'. Also, most parents come around when they see their children happy in their vocation. (My parents at first weren't too thrilled about my discernment, but when the time came for my actual consecration they were almost embarrassingly supportive and happy for me!) That being said, as I think you already sense, this is a big shock for your parents, so you probably need to be patient and give them the emotional "space" they need to process this news. Also, provided that you're not incurring student loans that would be challenging to pay back quickly, I don't think that finishing college is a bad idea. I think it is possible to "lose" a vocation if you did something like put it on the back burner for ten years while you drifted through life aimlessly; but I don't think it's likely for someone your age with a genuine vocation to lose a vocation in the relatively short and focused time it takes to finish an undergrad degree. Nobody likes to think about it during the "falling in love" phase of discernment, but built into the formation process is the possibility that you may discern out of the community. And you need to feel perfectly free to discern out, and to only stay on until final vows because you are happy in the community and you feel it's where God is continuing to call you--and not because you feel you "have to" stay, or because you couldn't imagine what you would do with your life if you left. Having a degree to fall back on is helpful for discernment in that respect. But even if (God willing!) you do persevere in whatever community you enter, finishing a degree will give you a sense of confidence, self-discipline, and personal maturity that will be a very helpful "dowry" to bring to religious life. And, even if you do wind up entering the community you're hoping to visit, PLEASE do check out at least one or two others, even if it's just a quick weekend visit. I think it makes for a healthier discernment when you have a slightly broader first-hand impression of how religious/consecrated life is lived in the Church today.
  10. Mercedes

    Will you get the vaccine?

    By that logic, because America made so much wealth off slavery, it's immoral to continue to reap those benefits today.
  11. Bonkira

    Discerning without parents' support

    It is good to keep moving forward, but it is also good to listen to the voices of those around you...often we talk about our parents being the first reflection of God's will for us, and a good way to practice obedience now. I also like to bring a bit of balance: you are interested in a community and they are interested in you visiting, and that is where you are. It's disingenuous to yourself and your discernment to add ownership to the mix...you have not yet set foot inside or even met them yet. While they may be interested in vocations, no community will be planning on you entering without at least some cursory work together and even more so for a cloistered order. And...setting your eyes on an international order as your first and only option is difficult in today's world, as immigration and visas are not cheap and most orders cannot pay for that. Your parents are not out of line asking for you to consider an order in the country you live in. As it seems you have not been interested in visiting what cloistered communities your country has, I would engage in that now as a way to communicate to your parents that you are considerate of their feelings. God leads in many mysterious ways, and many have found their homes in exactly that manner. Go for retreats and face to face meetings if possible and learn how each embraces the cloister. You may find God there, versus an order in Europe or God may lead you into an apostolic life or he may continue to place the order you are interested in at the center...but engaging is how you allow God to move within you and your life. Adding that if your eyes are currently set on the order in your icon, your discernment needs to be thorough and well fleshed out before you even visit. They are not shy about turning those away who they do not feel have a vocation to their monastery specifically, and have done it in initial visits during initial conversations without even entertaining a period of postulancy. It is a specific vocation to live as they live, and they are not an order that feels a responsibility to allow too many to try it out if they do not feel it will be fruitful.
  12. +JMJ+ I've had an account here for ages, but I've never summoned the courage to actually post! This feels like a perhaps gloomy topic to post about, but I'm very much in need of prayers and I thought of asking for them here. I've been discerning on and off for a while now, but discernment has been made complicated by a couple of factors, notably by the fact that my parents are not Catholic, but Lutheran. Over the last year or so, my discernment has gotten a lot more serious. I have been speaking with my spiritual director about my vocation and how the whole process is going, and we decided together that my next big step should be visiting my Community. I have exchanged several letters with the Prioress, since they are a traditional community with no online presence or phone number, and she has expressed an interest in me visiting them when possible. The issue is, I'm a student and my community is across an ocean, in Europe. My spiritual director seems to feel that I have a vocation, or at least that I show enough promise that he'd be willing to ask the parish to help me financially with travel expenses, etc. He is really encouraging and suggested I visit them on my next break, but it turns out that the earliest possible time would be next June, after the winter semester. In theory, I would be eligible to enter with them starting next October and, since it feels like everything is picking up all at once, I decided I should speak to my parents about all of this, since I still live with them. Our discussion did not end terribly well, not because they were angry, but I could feel their sadness in the air. I am quite young and I understand why they want to protect me and keep me close, but it is so painful to see this disconnect between us. I am very close to both of my parents and I wish I could make it easier for them. They want me to finish college before I even consider entering anywhere, but that is 3 years away, so I told them I couldn't promise waiting that long. Then they asked me to find a monastery in our own country, but there are few cloistered monasteries here to begin with, much less any that I feel called to (and yes, I have written to many, if not all, cloistered communities that I know of here). They asked for a compromise, like waiting until after Christmas 2022 to enter so that we have one last Christmas all together (for reasons beyond our control, we will be separated this Christmas) and, while I promised to think about it, I couldn't commit totally to it. Since they are not Catholic, any mention of extra graces from God just frustrates them; in their minds, my vocation will only be a loss to them. They want me to be happy, but they cannot understand and therefore they don't want me to make this big of a decision yet. They think I need to go into the world, study, travel, maybe even date, before committing to a monastery. I'm totally lost. I have nothing to hold onto but my Beloved. I have found a Community that I love and that is very open to the idea of me entering with them when the time comes, I have prayed so many novenas and had so many prayers answered, my spiritual director is very optimistic, and I feel like I have finally found my peace and my place in the world. All my life, I've been restless, and it is only within the cloister that I can imagine spending the rest of my time on Earth. My joy is in God alone, and it is in dying to myself to save souls. I know that my home is only in Jesus and that this world holds nothing for me. I will not enter tomorrow, I still have an entire year to discern at minimum, and I wish so desperately that somehow my parents would be remotely open to my discernment. Ultimately, as an adult, I can make my own decisions, and if it comes down to it, I will leave everything behind to follow Him, but I really do hope that I can preserve my relationship with my family if I do enter, God willing. I only beg for your charitable prayers, that my parents might begin to understand and, most of all, that God may grant me the strength and patience to weather this trial. If you have any advice, I will happily hear it, for there is nowhere to go but up at this point. I bear this only for Him, my Beloved. This process feels more and more lonely as I advance and I am coming to realize that I can no longer clutch onto anything but Him. +
  13. At Newark Benedictine Abbey on Sunday, October 17, Brother Bruno Mello professed his temporary vows. I believe that empties out their novitiate, but it also means that all of their men in formation (three, or maybe four) are now in temporary vows. https://www.facebook.com/newarkbenedictinemonks/photos/a.634277876673844/3917985264969739/
  14. Yesterday
  15. PhuturePriest

    Was Macht Der Fuchs Sagan?

    Glad to hear you're doing well!
  16. There are a number of active orders of Carmelite women. Carmelite Sisters of the Most Sacred Heart (Los Angeles): https://carmelitesistersocd.com/about/ Carmelite Sisters of the Divine Heart (more than one province): https://www.carmelitedcj.org/carmelite-sisters Carmelite Sisters for the Aged and Infirm: https://www.carmelitesisters.com/ Carmelite Sisters of St. Therese: https://www.carmelitesisters.com/
  17. cartermia

    Was Macht Der Fuchs Sagan?

    Hi everyone! Long time, no post! I graduated from college this past August with a degree in Philosophy, discerned out of religious life early on in my college career, and have been dating a great guy for a little over three years. I am getting my Masters of Theology in Bioethics and am currently waiting to hear back about a pro-life job in West Virginia. Keep on praying for me! I'm praying for you all <3
  18. cartermia

    Visitations of orders with the EF?

    Hi! There are some Carmelites in Cincinnati doing beautiful work. They are the Carmelite Daughters of St. Elias and I believe their mass is in the EF. It is said at Old St. Mary's in Cincinnati which is a beautiful and very traditional parish. This community, in my eyes, seem to be different from most Carmelites because they live a semi-contemplative lifestyle. This is what their mother said on Facebook a while back: " Why are Carmelites out of the cloister? If you asked Duns Scotus, he would say, because "God willed it- so it was." Pretty simple. Forgive me for liking simplicity. Whenever the world or Church had a need God raised up saints and sent Carmelites. . People need to see something to remind them of the Presence of God - so we wear Our Lady's habit. They need to be reminded of how much God loves them- so we wear the Cross. They need to feel loved- so we smile, listen, and share with them what we have... our material goods but more importantly, our hearts. They need to be challenged to not hop on one foot and then on the other - treading two paths- which is impossible- so Elias send his daughters to town. They need to be invited into God's house, to the Sacraments, and to be drawn to Heaven... so we open our doors and extend our hands, accompanying them along the way. They need love and a family- so here we are every day. They need prayers- and for souls to sacrifice and love for them- so Our Lady brings contemplatives with a face to town. They need Sisters to come and work with the children- because often violence, drugs, and mischief is what they are learning, instead of becoming whom God created them to be. They need gatherings for young adults and children- so they can not just stay in the Faith- but be on fire with it... so as to set the whole world on fire... So as to not sit on our candle and bushel baskets (which I imagine would not go well, if done in real life)--but to get out there and run- ! To run while we have the time and the light, and to take as many people with us we can. Unless we want to get to Heaven and see all of those empty spaces that we were supposed to help fill! Holy Mother St. Teresa of Jesus reminds us: “Christ has no body now but yours. No hands, no feet on earth but yours. Yours are the eyes through which he looks compassion on this world. Yours are the feet with which he walks to do good. Yours are the hands through which he blesses all the world. Yours are the hands, yours are the feet, yours are the eyes, you are his body. Christ has no body now on earth but yours.” What are we waiting for? We are not promised tomorrow- we have only today. We want to be here as a witness to the Presence and Love of God. We want to be here to work for the spiritual and moral formation of the youth. We want to make others feel loved- who otherwise feel worthless and have no one. We want to work with these kids who get into trouble down here because I'm watching it... So God gave us a place in the city and one in the country... We need your help to do all of this, however. Stay tuned for our newsletter and more information. You are daily in our prayers, please keep us in yours. Pax et gaudium!" If you want to write, their address is: 123 E. 13th Street Cincinnati, OH, OH 45202
  19. Hi! I am a 22 year old in a small rural town in Kentucky. My parish is starting up a young adult group with a neighboring parish. For the kick off, we had a candlelight mass and a social afterward with drinks and appetizers. They offered free childcare during the social afterwards. (A huge plus to support young families!) I would try to keep events simple and laid back to begin with. If you are in a good area to go hiking, that is always a good event too. When I studied abroad in Ireland, I loved Youth 2000 and their mission: https://youth2000.ie/about/how-we-began/
  20. DameAgnes

    2021 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    https://www.facebook.com/ssfpavocations/posts/4452644168120495
  21. Last week
  22. chrysostom

    Will you get the vaccine?

    Catholic philosopher Edward Feser on this topic. https://edwardfeser.blogspot.com/2021/10/covid-19-vaccines-and-jeffrey-dahmers.html?m=1&fbclid=IwAR0BBZ-kSM18EUTWRsc_-KJA1bzO8InUR-ZciAeDeleEFgUt9jcKZRflBwo#more I like his take.
  23. New pham member Judy Hough posted this comment (the title) about a week ago. I replied, saying that's a pretty broad request but that The Pham could probably help her out. Since no one else has replied to her in about a week, I thought I'd make it a separate thread so as not to hijack the original thread. Judy - what kind of information are you after? Pham - who knows evangelization and/or apologetics? GO!
  24. sr.christinaosf

    Thoughts from a Franciscan Sister

    http://ndfranciscans.org/fiat/peeling-carrots
  25. James and John left their fishing business and their father to follow Jesus. They have sacrificed a lot to continue with Jesus down this road of discipleship. But today we see that question, rearing its head: what’s in it for me? Now James and John are on the right track in that they do have faith in Jesus’ victory. Even though Jesus has been saying all these strange things, like “the first shall be last and the last first,” and “become like a child,” and “those who are great must be servants,” they have faith that Jesus is actually a good leader, a man with immense potential for power. Even though, like the rest of the disciples, they often do not get what he’s saying, they think even though some of his teachings are pretty idealistic, Jesus will be glorified, and they want to be there when it happens, on his right and on his left. They’re willing to follow Jesus, some of his prestige and power will trickle down to them. They’re approaching discipleship from this angle: what’s in it for me? The sons of Zebedee don’t realize Jesus’ talk about service as a way of life, is not merely a means to an end. They don’t realize the irony, that if you can give up that question – what’s in it for me? – and instead, serve, you will have an abundant, worthwhile, meaningful life. By giving up the question, what’s in it for me? you’ll get more than you ever dreamed. Jesus teaches and serves and lives and dies and is raised again for this truth: serving others is powerful. Giving up yourself for another, being emptied out in love is abundant life. But to find your way to these rewards, you have to stop asking the question, What’s in it for me? It is the question that reveals itself when people come to any church as consumers, not worshippers, not servants, looking only for what we can get out of it, not what we might put in, not what God might get out of it through our efforts to be attentive and present in prayer and praise, for just a little while once a week. What’s in it for me? It is a human question, one that we all ask at some time or another. Even in our Gospel lesson, the sons of Zebedee are not alone. When the other disciples hear that James and John have put themselves above their peers, they are angry, because they didn’t think of it first. They think of power the way the world thinks of power – as something that’s yours if you take it, if you’re the strongest, swiftest, most politically savvy, most well-connected. But Jesus sees beyond all of this. He could see them as they would become, filled with the Holy Spirit after Pentecost, transformed into courageous witnesses whose dreams of greatness, whose attitude had been replaced by the goal of serving the Lord. He could see that someday they ask, the other question in today’s Gospel, Jesus’ question:” What is it you want me to do for you?” This is the question Jesus always asks. Next week, we’ll hear Jesus ask it again when he asks a blind beggar, “What is it you want me to do for you?” And the man will ask for healing. This is Jesus’ question for all who come to him. This is Jesus’ open question – a question that guides his life, his willingness to meet us where we are, to allow us the freedom to tell him what we really want. This means sometimes that Jesus hears requests like James’ and John’s. And sometimes, Jesus hears the honest response of those who know that Jesus is our only hope: requests for healing, forgiveness, a second or third or fourth chance, a chance to try again, a chance to come before Jesus empty-handed and say, “Lord have mercy, Lord, let me know your grace and love.” A task for those who would follow Jesus is to allow Jesus to transform our questions so that we are people who ask not, “What’s in it for me?” but, “Jesus, what is it you want me to do for you?” And be brave enough to listen for Jesus’ answer and open to receive its rewards. When your question is, “What can I do for you?” when you concentrate on what you can put into church in the way of personal work and prayer and participation, you feel that you receive even more than you give. You find that service can be challenging, but it also brings deep joy. Service can be demanding, but it also brings pleasure, contentment, and hope. Jesus comes to us and asks, “What is it you want me to do for you?” May Jesus heal and transform us so that we might ask the same of him and be brave enough to listen to the answer.
  26. hakutaku

    Jägerstätter, Schneider, Vaccines, and Us

    Hey, looks like we're ahead of schedule: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/13/us/black-americans-vaccine-tuskegee.html
  27. https://fscc-calledtobe.org/2021/10/15/pope-francis-christus-vivit-a-presentation-by-sr-renee-mirkes-part-one/ Franciscan Sister Renée Mirkes, OSF, PhD is a member of the Franciscan Sisters of Christian Charity, Manitowoc, WI. She reflects on the vocational aspect of Pope Francis ”Christus Vivit”, focusing on the last few pages of the Pope's letter. Sr. Renee serves as director of the Center for NaProEthics [the ethics division of the Pope Paul VI Institute, Omaha, NE]. She received her masters degree in moral theology from the University of St. Thomas, Houston, TX and her doctorate in theological ethics from Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI. In her current position, she focuses on procreative and birth ethics through consultations, publications, and public speaking. To these commitments Sister Renée brings experience in clinical ethics as well as broad experience in bioethics.
  28. seo consultant efficient, and extra accurate scrapers are inside the progress of development, but needs assistance and testing from c# .internet and mysql/percona builders to be ready to be used. on behalf of all
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