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  3. BarbaraTherese

    Cardinal Pell's Appeal dismissed

    I am in another state of Australia to Victoria. I have never had anything to do with CArdinal Pell directly or indirectly. I never met him or even came close. What follows is only how he struck fallible and broken me quite personally from photos and television and before the breaking of the scandals. He always struck me as a cold and rigid, formidable, sort of man- not only in tone but in appearance, which was imposing. He was tall and quite well built. I found him intimidating in appearance and voice tone. I never saw him smile. When he was promoted to the Vatican Bank I think it was, I did think it would suit him as it seemed to me that possibly he would not be good with people, better with facts and numbers that add up or must add up. Rather often humanity does not. The above is only as the Cardinal struck me and evidential of nothing whatsoever except that - I think probably all practising CAtholics would have recognized Cardinal Pell without any difficulty whatsoever even as a much younger archbishop.
  4. cruciatacara

    End does not justify means

    Amen.
  5. cruciatacara

    Cardinal Pell's Appeal dismissed

    You are correct in that I said: "We all knew him and what he looked like. And how he behaved." Let me explain a little further what I meant. To go into any detail about his behaviour in both Ballarat and Melbourne would not be appropriate for this forum, especially as the charges that were initially laid against him for offences in Ballarat were eventually not brought to trial. But they were definitely well known by the public here. And those of us who interacted with him personally have stories to tell, but as I say, not appropriate here. The statement I made was actually intended merely to support my contention that it would be difficult for any Catholic who lives in the state of Victoria (and perhaps even all of Australia) to mistake Pell for any other priest, especially as he played significant roles in both Ballarat and Melbourne prior to becoming a cardinal. And at the time of the abuse at the Cathedral, he was the Archbishop... a very recognizable figure, certainly not unrecognizable to Catholics in Melbourne, especially those who attended Cathedral services. I was making my case in responding to the statement by Archbishop Comensoli that he believed the victim was abused but that he believed the victim was mistaken in who did it to him. This is simply not reasonable in my humble opinion. Perhaps Archbishop Comensoli is just trying to support Pell while also accepting the veracity of the victim. He is sitting on the fence because he doesn't know what to think, perhaps.
  6. Norseman82

    Laughter is good medicine.....

  7. Norseman82

    Laughter is good medicine.....

  8. BarbaraTherese

    End does not justify means

    It is tricky! I don't think that killing another can ever be a good, while it could be legitimate in motivation. One is not motivated to kill, rather to defend and protect. Were it to occur in self defence or in defence of another that I kill, I would be going to Confession first opportunity as a "just in case". Apparently too if a person is unsure of mortal sin or not, probably it was not mortal sin. I did read somewhere or other that the moral law and canon law is a minefield, which is why we have moral theologians and canon lawyers. I thought to myself, if that is true, then what hope do we have out here in the pews to understand. I do think that The Good Lord insights our inability perfectly. And yes, The Good Lord is Ultimate Mystery, Ineffable and Inscrutable.
  9. Lilllabettt

    Cardinal Pell's Appeal dismissed

    Pardon me. When you said "we all knew", I thought it was publicly known.
  10. cruciatacara

    End does not justify means

    Perhaps the end might actually justify the means in some occasions. For example, it is evil to kill someone, but if it were in defense of self or others then perhaps the end is good, even if the means are not. It is a tricky question. As for God, well, He is ineffable.
  11. cruciatacara

    Cardinal Pell's Appeal dismissed

    Ah the stories I could tell you! If only this were the proper forum for it, but it isn't. My knowledge of him is quite personal, but because of that, I will keep it personal. Thank you for your interest though.
  12. BarbaraTherese

    End does not justify means

    I do not think that the laws by which we are called to live are something imposed from above to keep us in line. Rather the laws by which we are called to live tell us something about God and His Nature and are revealed by God in order to draw us into Unity/Oneness with Him. This is why our laws are ideally embraced with love rather than a strictly moral need to obey the law, although that can be a beginning. A point from which I can grow. In other words, the end does not justify the means tells me something about God and the path to Unity and Oneness with Him in Love.
  13. BarbaraTherese

    End does not justify means

    Thank you for your input, Jane.
  14. Today's Gospel reading is the third of three parables in chapter 13 that deal with the theme of the unexpected reversals brought by the Kingdom of God. As this parable opens, Luke reminds us that Jesus is making his way to Jerusalem. He is teaching as he goes. A question from the crowd about will only a few be saved expresses the Jewish concern about whether everyone who calls himself a Jew is actually faithful to the covenant. This was a concern of the Pharisees. Their exclusive view had no place for the Gentiles, and their emphasis upon a strict observance of the prescriptions of the Law that was almost impossible for the common people, led them to conclude that the number of the saved would be rather small. Jesus answers that they must strive in the time remaining to enter through the narrow door because many will be trying to get in but won't be strong enough. The ‘narrow door’ of his parable does not imply that salvation is available to only a few; it refers to the conversion called for if his hearers are to accept his teaching, and thus become the people God wants them to be. Once all those entering the master's house are in and he locks the door, there will be no way for others to get in. Those left outside may knock, but the master will say he doesn't know them. The point of the parable of the ‘locked door’ is not exclusion, but the need to hurry in – the opportunity brought by Jesus is coming to an end. Only conversion from the constricted ways the nation has come to take for granted will give entrance to ‘the master’s house’ - knowing Jesus, even sitting at table with him, without heeding his call to become the people God intended them to be will leave them out in the cold. As Jesus also tells us in the Gospel of Matthew, “Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only the one who does the will of my Father in heaven.” (Matthew 7:21) People from the north, south, east, and west will take our place inside. Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and all the prophets will take our place in the Kingdom of God. Those who do not make it through the narrow door will be cast outside. The image of the door is replaced in the final verses of the parable with the image of the heavenly feast. Two passages from the Book of Isaiah influence the conclusion. Isaiah 43:5-6 speaks of God bringing Israel's descendants back from the east and from the west, the north and the south. And Isaiah 25:6 speaks of the Lord providing a feast of rich foods and choice wines for all peoples on his holy mountain. The answer to the question if only a few will be saved is no. In the end, many will be saved, but many who thought they would be saved will not be saved. The parable is a warning to repentance in order to enter the kingdom. A people who have not been faithful heirs to what they have received from ‘Abraham and Isaac and Jacob and all the prophets will find themselves ‘outside’. But God’s purposes will not be frustrated; the peoples of the world will ‘take their places at the feast in the kingdom of God’. Jesus was calling Israel back to a sharing in the generous ways of God that was their true faith tradition. But, as he makes his way to Jerusalem, time is running out. Do you know Jesus Christ as your personal Lord and Saviour? That question is often asked by evangelical preachers during their sermons. Those preachers challenge their listeners to consider if they truly know Jesus Christ in a personal way, or if their connection with Jesus is just a matter of being baptized and accepting certain facts about him. It is our actions rather than who we know that will save us. So, the more critical question is this: Does Jesus Christ know me as one of his disciples?
  15. little2add

    Would Donald Trump make a great Catholic!?

    Trump’s VP is catholic and really is pro-life. Joe Biden was VP and was pro-life, but now he’s not. think about that
  16. Yesterday
  17. BarbaraTherese

    2019 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    I am hoping so. Thank you for the article. Even if the increase is only slight, it is an increase and I am grateful for it. I hope and pray it will grow - even if it is only one little step at a time. I am surprised that there are not comprehensive statistics put out by the hierarchy. I did think there would have been with each diocese making reports to a central body.
  18. JHFamily

    2019 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    Unfortunately, 240 per year is rather pathetic, even if it is an uptick. That amounts to less than 5 per state. There are hotspots, however, that bring hope. I know one parish that has 4 young ladies in the same novitiate. My home parish has been getting one stable vocation (meaning that they haven't left the novitiate -- we've had more than that actually enter) for the last 4 years.
  19. AveMariaPurissima

    2019 Entrances, Vows, Ordinations

    You might be on to something there: https://www.globalsistersreport.org/news/trends/cara-survey-shows-uptick-number-men-women-taking-perpetual-vows-55834
  20. Lilllabettt

    Cardinal Pell's Appeal dismissed

    You knew how he behaved? How did he behave?
  21. Anomaly

    CS Lewis' Space Trilogy Book Discussion

    My apologies. I hadn’t realized you posted. Yes, CS is negative about space exploration, but one could only infer it as a literary tool. He’s creating a separation between the planets/ planes of existence in both a spiritual and physical sense it explore “what if” scenarios The tool seems to be used to define separate possibilities as far as responses to Grace, effects, and outcomes. At one point he tries to equate predestination and freedom, but I did not get his point. In my opinion, he forces the logic issue, though the Unman discussions were thought provoking. Elwin is still on Prelandara, no Mary Sue character. Sorry 77, if I gave spoilers away. I thought others had stopped reading.
  22. Jane_Doe2

    End does not justify means

    The saying "do the ends justify the means" is referring to human choices, not God's. God, by definition, is Perfectly Just. His fruits are Perfectly Good. Yes, sometimes it hurts along the way-- after all, was it not the Divine Father whom sent His only Son to suffer pain beyond mortal comprehension and die? He knows pain more than we ever could. Be He also knows that this is just for a moment and brings about His Perfect healing and miracles.
  23. BarbaraTherese

    Quotations that Motivate & Inspire

  24. BarbaraTherese

    Quotations that Motivate & Inspire

    If your life consistently bears no fruit, God will intervene to discipline you. If your life bears some fruit, God will intervene to prune you. If your life bears a lot of fruit, God will invite you to abide more deeply with Him. - Bruce Wilkinson (It might even be that all three are going on. How do you experience God disciplining, pruning and inviting you to abide more deeply?)
  25. BarbaraTherese

    End does not justify means

    Thank you, cruciatacara, for taking the time to post what you have. Your first response above is something along the lines of my thinking. Cause and effect in sin is the one action. Sin and the consequences are the one action. My problem is that God does have the power to remove the consequence but permits it anyway, knowing He can bring about a greater good. My problem is that it seems to contradict "the end cannot justify the means". However, it seems to me that in permitting the consequence of sin to bring about a greater good, God has not justified the sin and its consequences to bring about a greater good. God has simply permitted to bring about a greater good. What is justified is God's Ability and Right to permit in order to bring about a greater good and that is intrinsically a great good of itself. And so, in this instance, the end has not justified the means, because the means was Just in the first place i.e. God's Ability and Right over His creation. I think that an overly bulky and quite clumsy explanation of where I am at at this point. In the second half of your response, actually this is pretty much what I have arrived at too in relation to my comments above and "the end cannot justify the means" and the seeming contradiction: "Thus, the question ................. is in need of constant meditation and consideration if the Church is to offer a credible apologetic to an increasingly sceptical world." Thank you for what you have posted as I can rest Peacefully in the previous sentence as quoted.
  26. cruciatacara

    End does not justify means

    I don't know if this will help or confuse the issue more, but it is an explanation of sorts taken from Aquina's works. http://oscott.net/problem-evil-st-thomas-aquinas/
  27. BarbaraTherese

    End does not justify means

    Thank you again for your post. It is not the problem of suffering that befuddles me. Sin has come into the world and continued in the world and comes with consequences (cause and effect) i.e. suffering. Neither is it the nature of God in the whole question of suffering a problem for me. God as a Compassionate and Loving God in Infinite Mercy with whom I have a personal relationship is not in question either, nor my relationship with His Church. What I am trying to discern is a contradiction SEEMINGLY in Church teaching. I am not stating that The Church is wrong in what She has stated, rather that there SEEMS to be a contradiction. I think possibly mine is a philosophical type of question while being unsure of that too. I think perhaps St Thomas would have addressed it somewhere or other in the Summa with which I am not at all familiar, not even remotely close to familiar. My question is summarised in the first paragraph quoted below. ____________________ My question is a difficulty, not a doubt. ____________________ I think I MIGHT be starting to see a bit of daylight in my question.........just can't quite get it as yet/find the words to investigate 'the daylight'. I either will, or I wont.
  28. BarbaraTherese

    Cardinal Pell's Appeal dismissed

    I very much agree with you. If an ordinary Catholic stated what the Archbishop did, it is one thing - for an Archbishop to state it publicly at this point (nothing judicially finally settled) carries some weight and quite wrongly timed - and does make me wonder where our hierarchy's head in Australia might be. They state that they will accept the outcome of the Cardinal Pell charges - but will they really? Sometimes, our hierarchy know how to say all the right words - however, putting into practise behind the scenes can be another matter entirely. I experienced this with the subject of (my) mental illness and Church authority. I am very much hoping victims of sexual abuse will not experience this, while I do fear they could. Words are one thing, changing one's thinking is another entirely and far more difficult. It is the challenge for our Church authorities.
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