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  2. little2add

    Drop a word, keep a word

    Deep sleep
  3. little2add

    Son of shaircroppers, American hero

    It’s hard to believe that a person could rise above such adversity and not only prosper but rise to top of our political system. it’s rumored that his wife may step in his place and run for his office. I would vote for her if I could but I live in a different part of the country
  4. Today
  5. nikita92

    website ideas?

    I totally agree with this!! As a matter of fact, I have that exact topic on my Pinterest. Photos of all types and kinds of religious *cells*/rooms!
  6. JHFamily

    website ideas?

    Home Page: A short description of your community and charism, along with one community picture. A clear menu. A schedule of public liturgies and upcoming events. The best home page I've seen is for these Benedictines. When I'm browsing through community websites, this is what I like to see immediately in the menu: 1. Franciscan Life: Charism, founders, etc. with a few pictures of the buildings, founders, etc. You can provide further links on this page, rather than put them on the home page. 2. Apostolates: with another menu "Schools", "Nursing Homes", "Missions" etc. or if there are not enough to need a separate menu, then clearly defined as headers. 3. Prayer: Mass times, the Divine Office, including which Hours you pray as a community and required individually, Rosary, and other special devotions. 4. Vocations: An explanation of the different stages, particularly the timeline of your own community. Include age and health requirements and a horarium. An article on what it means to have a Franciscan vocation, particularly one in your community. A day in the life would be nice, as well. Frequently asked questions. Concrete information so that a young lady can get an idea whether she can live this life or wants to live this life. Links for Vocation Resources (optional). Your website is certainly lacking in this area. 5. Blog: Somewhere I can find the latest news as well as spiritual reflections as well as your usual posts. In other words, keep doing what you're doing. Oh, definitely a picture with every post, though. 6. Newsletters: (If you print one). Access to past newsletters. 7. Photo Gallery ... maybe. But this may work better in the blog. Only do this if you have lots of pictures of events, not just odds and ends. 8. Contact information. Have donation information and links here, too. I wouldn't include any videos that are not of your community. They distract from the purpose of the website -- to learn about your community. These things are easy to access elsewhere, and it avoids any controversial figures being associated with your community. (So, to be brutally honest, after seeing Fr. Martin on your vocation web page, I'd close out that tab and mark you off the list.) Good websites do not need extra links. If you feel that they are absolutely necessary, put them in the blog portion, but then again, just don't.
  7. Luigi

    Spirituality Type

    Trappists, sure as shamrocks grow in Ireland! Lots of silence, communal prayer (7 times a day, and you can include the rosary), Lectio Divino (scripture reading & reflection), community life, and nature (outdoor work). But each monastery - Trappists included - has its own emphasis and character. Thus, Beatitude's caveat not to check the boxes and narrow your choice to a guaranteed correct answer. There are currently 10 Trappist monasteries (of monks - 5 of nuns) in the US, each with their own 'flava' depending on where they are, the . http://www.trappists.org/our-monasteries/ If you're in another country, check out www.ocso.org But there's also a Benedictine monastery in New York that raises sheep, harvests the wool, hosts knitting retreats, and so forth. Same deal as the Trappists except they have communal prayer 4 times a day. Again, see Beatitude's caveat. The only way to figure it out is - as she said - meet & greet, get to know them, let them get to know you, see the lay of the land, large community or small community, find out what kind of work they do (grow mushrooms? grow grapes? build caskets? bake? write books? - all of them host retreats to some extent or another). Everybody who has responded has good advice. WORD!
  8. nikita92

    Spirituality Type

    Putting all your *different* eggs (interests) in one basket, are not going to exactly fit the design of that basket. Take time to explore each specific community! God will ultimately let you know where you belong.
  9. Count Claydus

    Spirituality Type

    Yes, that is my problem. I love to study very much and like a few Dominican saints such as Aquinas and Albertus Magnus, but I am attracted to them because of their theology, not their preaching. Is there a contemplative order which places it’s attention to study, contemplation, and prayer. I have a certain attraction to medieval monasteries in which they said all the divine office and had a solemn mass, but where they also put much emphasis on writing, reading, and studying.
  10. beatitude

    Spirituality Type

    Be careful not to fall into the trap of viewing different spiritualities/charisms as like filing cabinets - e.g. "If I tick all these boxes, then I file myself with the Dominicans." No one's spiritual life works like that. The truth is that there will be individuals in every single religious order who would tell you that they love books, the rosary, Scripture, studying, and so on. Bl. Titus Brandsma and St Edith Stein were both academics who studied and wrote prolifically, and they weren't Dominicans, they were Carmelites. The best (in fact, the only) way to discern is to get in dialogue with some religious communities, develop a relationship with them, and let yourself be guided by the question, "Could being here teach me to love God and neighbour to the fullest?" You will only be able to answer that in dialogue with a specific community - you won't find an answer online, or by reading up on different spiritualities and charisms. If only you're guided by this question, then everything else will fall into place.
  11. JHFamily

    Spirituality Type

    When I read "heavily introverted", that immediately brings a question mark to my mind. All communities will require a person to be able to fully participate in recreation and community life. If heavily introverted means that you cannot do this, then I would say that you need to overcome that first. However, if heavily introverted means that you are awkward around strangers and would rather avoid parties but enjoy visiting with those you know, then I would say this won't be a problem. I'm assuming the latter described you in that you are attracted to community life. Solemn prayer, community life, Mass, the Rosary, and the reading of Scripture are common to most cloistered communities. Benedictines have a special emphasis on the Office and Lectio Divina (scripture reading with meditation). Dominicans are often thought of as having a special devotion to the Rosary and tend to study more than the average. Carmelites emphasize contemplative prayer and solitude (though they still have recreation and sometimes need to work with others!). The Franciscans are more penitential and have a great love for nature. You mentioned attractions that belong to all of these! But which draws you the most?
  12. Swami Mommy

    Spirituality Type

    Trappistine, perhaps? Benedictine would be my second choice, although hospitality is a strong component of their charism and if you are introverted you may not like bumping into random weekend visitors staying in guest houses on retreat. That being said, an oyster needs the irritant of a grain of sand to create a pearl. In like manner, if we have a natural tendency in ourselves that is very strong, it is sometimes helpful to be placed in situations that push the edge of our boundaries a bit and to ‘go against type’. For example, you mention that your interests are more mind-oriented. To balance that out, in a monastery setting you may be assigned more physical, outdoorsy work just to bring your attention back into your body and to ground you more. Or, if you are very introverted, you may be asked to assume a more public responsibility like doing the readings at Mass or greeting congregants at the exit afterwards if there is a local community Mass offered. It’s easy to feel spiritual when life feeds and supports our natural inclinations, but sometimes the truest level of spiritual maturity is best assessed by seeing if we can keep or hearts open even in what we would consider to be hellish circumstances that force us to grow beyond our comfort zone.
  13. Count Claydus

    Spirituality Type

    Hello? May one describe my spirituality type and order, such as Benedictine, Jesuit, Franciscan... Description: I am heavily introverted, I like solemn prayer, community life, mass and study. I believe the study of God and his creation leads towards union with him. I love silence, cloisters, books. My favorite saints are Sts. Gregory the Great, Thomas Aquinas, and John the Apostle. I love the rosary and scripture reading. May someone describe my spirituality type?
  14. little2add

    Son of shaircroppers, American hero

    Elijah Cummings Elijah Eugene Cummings (January 18, 1951 – October 17, 2019) was an American politician and civil rights advocate who served in the United States House of Representatives for Maryland's 7th congressional district from 1996 until his death in 2019.[1] The district includes just over half of the city of Baltimore, most of the majority-black precincts of Baltimore County, as well as most of Howard County. He previously served in the Maryland House of Delegates. He was a member of the Democratic Party. Cummings served in the Maryland House from 1983 through 1996. That year, he was elected to the U.S. House. Cummings served as the chair of the Committee on Oversight and Reform from January 2019 until his death in October 2019. Cummings was born on January 18, 1951, in Baltimore, the son of Ruth Elma (née Cochran) and Robert Cummings. His parents were sharecroppers. He was the third child of seven. When he was 11 years old, Cummings and some friends worked to integrate a segregated swimming pool in South Baltimore. Cummings, who had cancer, died on October 17, 2019, at Gilchrist Hospice Care at the age of 68 from "complications concerning longstanding health challenges May God bless his descendants.
  15. Josh

    Pope Francis

    I never said there was nothing to see. I said these people appear to literally hate Pope Francis.
  16. passerby

    website ideas?

    I appreciate when a community states clearly what their spirituality and apostolates are. Sometimes there is lots of pious language but I don't actually know what sort of works that they do! And recent news and events is always great.
  17. Maximilianus

    Pope Francis

  18. Yesterday
  19. KnightofChrist

    Pope Francis

    What are we to think about the ceremony of the would be fertility idol in the Vatican gardens? A ceremony that matches one of pagan worship. H6P39XswlzI Here is the ceremony. The Vatican press office says this statue is not Mary. But they bow down and venerated it. So who or what are they venerating?
  20. GraceUk

    website ideas?

    I think photos of the inside of the convent and gardens are nice. Also a typical day in the life of a sister. And vocation stories of different sisters are very interesting to read
  21. Swami Mommy

    website ideas?

    I didn’t mean that you should show photos of cells that are already occupied—just an empty, staged cell with the typical basic setup so someone can imagine themselves in a similar space. I personally would also love to see meditation walking trails if there is attached acreage monastery grounds. And when I look at photos of the community at prayer in their chapel, I like to count how many sisters are in their appointed places in the pews to get an idea of how large the community is and the general age composition. Some people prefer small, intimate communities, but I would prefer being in a larger community of twenty-five to fifty women, so I would look to see how many other people I would be sharing communal prayer time with. I also love looking at photos of sisters doing their daily assignments—cooking, cleaning, laundry, preparing specialty products to sell, gardening, animal husbandry, artistic arts, choir practice, and apostolic ministries, especially when the photos are unstaged and natural so that some of the photos show sisters engrossed in their work without cued smiles. A collection of your fellow sisters’ vocation stories and perhaps some honest comments about the challenges to be expected in a religious vocation can also be quite inspirational and realistically accurate. I also like seeing photos of sisters in meditation in the early morning hours, and the entire community eating in the refectory. If a habit is worn, it would be nice to read about the symbolism of the various component pieces that make up the habit. I guess I like websites that give a rounded view of the daily life of a community and help a person picture themselves in a similar life. While artistic photos can be pretty, I prefer pictures that are practical. I don’t need to see photos of flickering candles on an altar, as atmospherically mystical as they may seem.
  22. sr.christinaosf

    website ideas?

    Thanks. There is something, though, about the privacy and enclosure of each sister. The World Wide Web is so very public...
  23. Dymphna

    website ideas?

    I second Luigis comment about keeping the site up to date - I prefer a smaller site with current information than a large but outdated one. When you think about content, a good starting point may be to ask yourself what the purpose of the site is, who the visitors are you want to attract. Is it people who want to share your life and spirituality? - include information about mass, prayer times, vocation (or other public) events. Is it potential donors? Tell them about projects of your congregation where their money might be useful. Is it local people or friends who want to know what's going on in your community? They would probably love pictures and stories of recent events.... You get the idea. And of course I don't mean you need to focus on one single thing!
  24. Nunsuch

    website ideas?

    Since yours is an active community, I think information about, and pictures of, sisters engaged in their ministries are interesting. Also, I think views of informal community life (sisters working and playing together "at home") are good.
  25. Not A Mallard

    Laughter is good medicine.....

  26. little2add

    why do people hate catholics

    I often hear that some people think Catholics are bad because they worship statues.
  27. little2add

    Pope Francis

  28. Swami Mommy

    website ideas?

    This may sound trite to some, but the one thing I almost never see but usually look for, are photos of the sisters’/nuns’ cells. It helps to have that visual of the private space to which a person would retreat at the end of the day in order to imagine oneself spending a lifetime there.
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