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Saint_Gemma_Galgani

Franciscans Of The Immaculate

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puellapaschalis
Still?! No matter what the Cornish might tell you, that part of Britain hasn't been independent of the London-ruled Anglo-Saxon-Norman-thing since 1066 ;)

(mind you, my USA geography is terrible)

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Thomist-in-Training
Speaking of geography, a good way to learn some and enjoy the original topic of StGemma's thread at the same time ;) is [url="http://www.missiomariae.net/"]this new website with the FI Missions[/url], "Missio Mariae". It lists the location of friaries in each country, Italy excepted; a brief history of how the FI came to be present there; and many geographical, cultural and historical facts about the country. The site is very well-organized, and it's exciting to see the faraway places like Kazakhstan and Benin with familiar habits there!

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Rising_Suns
[quote name='Saint_Gemma_Galgani' post='1515686' date='May 1 2008, 02:07 AM']I just recently learned of the Franciscans of the Immaculate, and they sound like they would be a great fit for me, as they love Our Lady, are orthodox and fully obedient to the Holy Father, and are rather traditional (full habit, the aforementioned devotion to Our Lady, many Masses in Latin, and even the Extraordinary Form of the Mass occasionally). Before I write a letter to them expressing interest in their order, is there anything, good or bad, that I should know about them?[/quote]

Ave Maria.

If you have a devotion to Saint Gemma Galgani, then the FI may be a good fit for you. As everyone else has said, they are a very orthodox order, and not afraid of a little penance. Some people consider the FI the marines of the Franciscans today, as most Franciscan orders today have become more relaxed and secularized.

As Jesus said to Saint Gemma Galgani, [b][i]"My child, I have need of victims, and strong victims, who by their sufferings, tribulations, and difficulties, make amends for sinners and for their ingratitude." [/i][/b]

If you read their rule of life, you will find that it is in line with the spirit of the greatest mystics of the Church; the spirit of "prayer, of poverty, and penance" (read their [b][url="http://www.ewtn.com/library/PRIESTS/TRACMARI.TXT"]Traccia here[/url][/b]). The FI are very contemplative for a Franciscan community; they place a strong emphasis on prayer and penance, because they realize that without it, all the works in the world--even the greatest miracles--will be to no avail without the prayers and sacrifices behind it.

As the angel at Fatima stated; [b][i]"Make everything you do a sacrifice, and offer it as an act of reparation for the sins by which God is offended, and as a petition for the conversion of sinners". [/i][/b]

They have a strong formation regime, which includes 3 rosaries per day, and 2 hours of Eucharistic adoration with Benediction, the Chaplet of Divine Mercy, the Litany of Loretto, and a host of other powerful prayers, spiritual readings, and meditation. Many of their friaries have perpetual adoration. They place a strong emphasis on the vow of obedience, as they should, as the Saints have. They are allowed to talk during certain meals, but as I understand it, this is usually only on feast days and Sundays. Fridays they eat their meals on their knees. Dinner is optional, and fasting is encouraged. (they also know how to have fun, and enjoy their recreation time).

In a word, if you feel called to the Franciscan order, then there is little else out there that matches this community. You may look into the Franciscan Friars of the Primitive Observance, but if you are a traditional Catholic and love the latin Mass, chanted divine office (rather than spoken), and prayers in latin, then the FI is really your only option.

My prayers are with you in your discernment.

[b][i]"Yes, I love the cross, the cross alone. I love it because I always see it behind Jesus' shoulders."
-Padre Pio[/i][/b]

Blessings.
. Edited by Rising_Suns

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Thomist-in-Training
Thanks for the link and the other information, Rising Suns! I did a search to see if I could find the Traccia in the Italian too and guess what I found? An article on the Poor Clares of the Immaculate, whom I've been trying to learn more about for ages! [url="http://www.missiomariae.com/rivista/Autunno_02.htm#Clarisse%20dell’Immacolata"]Click on "Testimonia: Clarisse dell'Immacolata."[/url] The gist of it is that, after many Rosaries they were established in 2002 (at least the community at Aulla, Italy); they are true Poor Clares; they make the Marian Vow. There is a small picture there, although I don't know whether or not they still wear the same habit as the FSI.

So thank you for the link, you helped my curiosity on two points at once, since I am also interested to read the Traccia. :)

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DominicanPhilosophy
Wow, actually not too long ago I got two books in the mail - Devotion to Our Lady and Come & Follow Me, both by Fr. Stefano M. Manelli - along with a beautiful two-page letter written by one of the sisters [in hot pink font, nonetheless..gotta love it!]. I have been doing a lot of reading lately, quite a bit for school, but the little I have started reading of the Come & Follow Me book is awesome. I really love the community and had been seeing them online a lot, looking at their site and peoples' links to pictures of their habits. Tonight, actually, when sorting through my stack of books I want to read, I made the connection between the books and the letter and the community I had been looking at online! I don't really remember contacting them initially, but it was smack in the middle of final exams when I got the stuff in the mail, so it's unlikely I would remember anyway. I got very good vibes from the letter and the book thus far, and though I don't feel as if I am called to the FI community, I really love it! It seems like a really beautiful congregation.

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Rising_Suns
Ave Maria.

Just a postscript; if anyone is seriously considering entering, know that entrance is ordinarily August 14th (Feast Day of St. Maximilian Kolbe). However, that date can be pushed back a few months if necessity requires it (I was told usually no later than the end of September).

Blessings.

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Chiquitunga
[quote name='Thomist-in-Training' post='1598985' date='Jul 12 2008, 09:09 PM']Thanks for the link and the other information, Rising Suns! I did a search to see if I could find the Traccia in the Italian too and guess what I found? An article on the Poor Clares of the Immaculate, whom I've been trying to learn more about for ages! [url="http://www.missiomariae.com/rivista/Autunno_02.htm#Clarisse%20dell’Immacolata"]Click on "Testimonia: Clarisse dell'Immacolata."[/url] The gist of it is that, after many Rosaries they were established in 2002 (at least the community at Aulla, Italy); they are true Poor Clares; they make the Marian Vow. There is a small picture there, although I don't know whether or not they still wear the same habit as the FSI.[/quote]
Wow! Neato! I am just after first hearing about them in the other thread on the new site of the Friars in Maine, NY. It looks like they are coming to make a foundation there. [url="http://www.mtstfrancis.com/Poor_Clares.htm"]http://www.mtstfrancis.com/Poor_Clares.htm[/url] Awesome! Edited by Margaret Clare

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Thomist-in-Training
I can't believe I didn't notice this sooner! [url="http://www.airmaria.com/?sn=34&vp=1739&prefx=finews&plyrnb=1&ttl=FI%20News"]Slideshow on the AirMaria web site about the Poor Clares of the Immaculate.[/url]

:))

edit. P.S. This Italian sister has the most lovely voice... Roma mi manca! I miss Rome! Edited by Thomist-in-Training

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Rising_Suns
Thank you for posting the slide show.

I thought it also worth noting that there is a new Shrine in WI being built in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and the friars of the Immaculate have been given the honor of staffing the Shrine once it is complete.

[img]http://airmaria.com/media/finews/OLOGShrine.jpg[/img]
[img]http://bp1.blogger.com/_W7Qfxn8Y454/R8QScfgWlaI/AAAAAAAAAP8/KZ5HorBLfNs/s400/baldachino-1.jpg[/img]

More here: [url="http://www.airmaria.com/2008/02/26/pictures-appearing-of-new-shrine-to-be-staffed-by-fis/"]http://www.airmaria.com/2008/02/26/picture...staffed-by-fis/[/url]

It is really quite beautiful.

Blessings. Edited by Rising_Suns

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Rising_Suns
For those of us who cherish the Traditional Latin Mass, Gregorian Chant, and use of the latin language, I thought it worth posting this bit of news from December of 2007, detailing the new changes to the FI's liturgy ([b][u]emphasis mine[/u][/b]);


*************************
[img]http://airmaria.com/media/finews/p000780-1.jpg[/img]
[url="http://www.airmaria.com/2007/12/16/fi-news-liturgical-changes-at-griswold/"]Lunk to Full Article[/url]
[b]FI News - Liturgical Changes at Griswold [/b]

Ave Maria!

The last few months, at the North American Mother House for the Franciscans of the Immaculate in Griswold, CT have been marked with great excitement, ever since the Feast of the Exaltation of the Cross when the extra ordinary form of the Mass (Traditional Latin Mass or TLM) was celebrated with great solemnity by Fr. Peter Fehlner, who, following the Mass in the sacristy turned to the Acolytes and commented joyfully €œthat is the Mass that St. Peter celebrated€?. The following day Fr. Angelo Geiger celebrated a beautiful low Mass [b]and the momentum and zeal for the TLM has been growing rapidly ever since[/b].

With the visitation of our Most Reverend Father Founder and Minister General, Fr. Stefano Manelli, came the news that[b] he desired the novices to be proficient in serving the TLM as soon as possible[/b]. [b]Of course, this news was received with great enthusiasm on the part of the novices who were given a few days a week to learn the detailed rubrics of serving it. Currently, the Griswold friary offers the TLM periodically, but with ever increasing frequency[/b] especially on Wednesdays for the 5:30 St. Joseph Mass, and for the evening Masses on feast days in honor of Our Lady. Diligently, the friars are preparing to celebrate a Missa Cantata (a Sung High Mass without Deacon and Sub-Deacon) with great solemnity for Christmas Eve Mass. To ensure that the Mass is offered with the greatest dignity and reverence as it has been passed down to us by Holy Mother Church, a careful study and preparation has been undertaken to learn the detailed but beautiful rubrics for the varying degrees of solemnity for which the Mass can be offered. Thankfully, we have had wonderful resources at our disposal and owe special thanks to the Society of St. John Cantius through their web site Sancta Missa, as well as receiving hands-on guidance from The Saint Gregory Society in New Haven, CT which is dedicated to preserving the TLM and has been doing so for over 20 years.

All this excitement about the liturgy [b]has spilled over to the ordinary form of the Mass (Novus Ordo) inspiring our Father Guardian, Fr. Ignatius to announce that all Masses at the friary will be celebrated Ad Orientem[/b] (when the priest faces east, with the people, toward Our Lord in the tabernacle). [b]There has also been an increasing number of Novus Ordo Masses offered in Latin, including our Sunday liturgy[/b]. [b]Currently, the friars are working towards developing a schola choir to sing the Gregorian Mass parts for the ordinary and extraordinary forms of the Mass. Also we are implementing the long planned switch to Latin for our community prayers at the Griswold friary, such as meal prayers, visitation to the Blessed Sacrament, and a daily Rosary[/b].

For all this excitement we sincerely say Deo Gracias, Holy Father Pope Benedict XVI, and Praised be Jesus and Mary, now and forever

Ave Maria!

+++ Edited by Rising_Suns

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puellapaschalis
What wonderful news! Since last Sunday I've become a big fan of the TLM. Hurray for Summorum Pontificum and FSSP and all those orders which treasure, offer, assist at and attend the TLM. It's a great thing.

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Chiquitunga
[quote name='Thomist-in-Training' post='1611153' date='Jul 28 2008, 08:43 PM']I can't believe I didn't notice this sooner! [url="http://www.airmaria.com/?sn=34&vp=1739&prefx=finews&plyrnb=1&ttl=FI%20News"]Slideshow on the AirMaria web site about the Poor Clares of the Immaculate.[/url]

:))

edit. P.S. This Italian sister has the most lovely voice... Roma mi manca! I miss Rome![/quote]
Oh wow, how beautiful!! Thanks for sharing this! Grazie tanto!

I received a reply from one of the friars in NY the other day. Here's some of the email ..

[quote]Ave Maria!

The Poor Clares of the Immaculate were officially erected by a decree of the Holy See on May 8, 2002. They now have 4 monasteries, with a total of about 60 nuns, most of them in their twenties and thirties. Together with the friars and sisters, they are part of a single religious family, united by the same founders, the same Marian-Franciscan spirituality and the same Vow of Total Consecration to Our Lady. Our common goal is to bring a new springtime of grace and holiness to the Church by returning to the origins of the Seraphic Order, founded at the little Church of St. Mary of the Angels, which St. Francis lovingly rebuilt with his own hands.

The Poor Clares of the Immaculate live according to the original Rule of our Holy Mother St. Clare, with no mitigations, and the Traccia Mariana, a document drawn up by our founder, Fr. Stefano M. Manelli, which gives clear indications on how to faithfully live out the charism of Our Blessed Father Francis in the modern world, according to the example of St. Maximilian M. Kolbe. They wear a grey-blue habit (like the friars and sisters), with a sky-blue veil and the Miraculous Medal worn over the breast.

The four existing monasteries are located in Italy, but young women from other parts of the world have begun to enter the Order as well, which gives us hope that in a few years' time they will begin to found monasteries in other countries, and on other continents ...[/quote] Edited by Margaret Clare

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puellapaschalis
Reading Fr. Tim's blog, I've learnt that the Franciscan Sisters of the Immaculate also have a house near the Friary in Cornwall as well as near London.

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Selah
Oh dear...I would love to join the Franciscan Sisters...I am discerning now. What an honor to be a part of this order, should it come to pass...

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