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A Bit More Information About Laetita Crucis


IgnatiusofLoyola

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Before she left, Laetitia said that she would LOVE to receive letters. However, as I think has been posted before, she will not be able to respond to letters, except for cards/notes during Advent and Easter. (She is allowed to exchange letters with her family, however.)

I wasn't sure how to address letters to Laetitia, since some orders call their postulants "Sister" while others do not. However, I have since found out that, while she is a postulant, Laetitia will be simply "Sadora Bloom." When she enters the novitiate (hopefully in a year) she will receive her religious name and the title "Sister."

I hope this information is helpful to those of you planning to write her. Although she cannot reply to letters, visitors are welcome, the next time you happen to be in the neighborhood of Lymington (near Southampton, UK), although notification in advance would probably be appreciated.

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Although it's great to keep in touch with her, and to let her know she's loved, it's probably also a good idea to give her some time to let go of the world and to start focusing only on God and her new life. The reason she isn't allowed to reply is because during the first few years, the postulant and novice is being formed. Too many distractions, even from those who love her dearly, are not going to be in her best interests. She will be experiencing some homesickness and loneliness, even though she is surrounded by all her sisters, and she has to learn how to turn to God for her consolations during this time rather than back to the world of human consolation. So, although it's good to remember her at all special occasions such as birthday and holidays, my advice is not to inundate her with letters and cards that remind her of everything she has left behind.

Just one opinion ..............
:nunpray:

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[quote name='nunsense' timestamp='1286751655' post='2178980']
Although it's great to keep in touch with her, and to let her know she's loved, it's probably also a good idea to give her some time to let go of the world and to start focusing only on God and her new life. The reason she isn't allowed to reply is because during the first few years, the postulant and novice is being formed. Too many distractions, even from those who love her dearly, are not going to be in her best interests. She will be experiencing some homesickness and loneliness, even though she is surrounded by all her sisters, and she has to learn how to turn to God for her consolations during this time rather than back to the world of human consolation. So, although it's good to remember her at all special occasions such as birthday and holidays, my advice is not to inundate her with letters and cards that remind her of everything she has left behind.

Just one opinion ..............
:nunpray:
[/quote]

Very good advice Nunsense... She needs time with God and her community to make the proper transitions. I second your thinking on this matter.:like2:

Edited by Indwelling Trinity
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+Praised be Jesus Christ

Perhaps if one really wanted to reach out and show support, a good method might be to write to the Community Proper - and clearly say you are thinking of the dear one and specifically ask not for an answer (thus releasing them from social obligations of answering). I do believe most Communities love to know they are held in prayer as we are held in their prayers....

Pax,

TradMom

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[quote name='TradMom' timestamp='1286759048' post='2179005']
+Praised be Jesus Christ

Perhaps if one really wanted to reach out and show support, a good method might be to write to the Community Proper - and clearly say you are thinking of the dear one and specifically ask not for an answer (thus releasing them from social obligations of answering). I do believe most Communities love to know they are held in prayer as we are held in their prayers....

Pax,

TradMom
[/quote]

Excellent idea TradMom - and they can read out a message in Recreation for everyone to enjoy.

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This post is in response to Nunsense's post above. I was wondering if the opposite thing might happen--that, longer term, there might be too few letters to her.

In today's world, we're not used to writing letters. In fact, I can't remember the last time I wrote a letter. Even my 83-year old mother now finds it easier to send and receive email than letters. I don't even know what the postage is to send a letter to England from the U.S.

What I wondered might happen is that L-C might get many letters in the beginning from her Phatmass friends and others, but, because it is unusual (and difficult) to write letters to which you don't get an answer, the letters might not continue. Some of this would be expected, of course, and L-C does have a circle of women who have been close friends with her for many years, so I expect they would continue to write in any case. But, they, too, might find it very hard to continue to write.

So, I worried (you know I tend to be a worrier) that, in the longer term, mail might drop off so much that L-C might feel she was not loved and remembered.

Not having been through formation, I don't know how the formation process is different for a cloistered nun than for an active Sister, as L-C will be. And, L-C is not joining a Community where she is likely to be sent elsewhere, particularly to a third-world country or somewhere where she would be unlikely to see her friends and family again, or at least very rarely. From the little bit L-C told me about her life after formation, she will be having constant contact with people in the local community, and will leave the Priory almost every day as part of her apostolate. And, she will remain in England with the Community, not sent elsewhere. Or, to be exact, at least, as far as I am aware, there are no expectations that she will be sent elsewhere.

So, while I expect that one important goal of formation for an active Sister, like a cloistered nun, would be to learn to depend on God and her Sisters, I also wonder whether, after formation, the everyday life of an active Sister in these specific circumstances would be as separate from her former life as it would be for a cloistered nun. Visitors are welcome to the Priory, although I don't know if there are any additional rules if a postulant's family and friends live close by. But, at least after formation, I wonder whether an active Sister in this community would be cut off from her family and friends in the way that a cloistered nun would, or an active Sister who was called to a mission on the other side of the world.

These are mostly questions on my part, since I have no idea--and I expect L-C has no idea at this point--how all this works. So, I'm not suggesting at ALL that L-C should be inundated constantly with letters. I just wondered whether letters would negatively affect the formation of an active Sister in her particular Community and circumstances as much as they would a cloistered nun.

BTW--If you noticed, I said in my post that L-C herself said she would love letters--I was simply quoting her words to me and what she has said to others. I was neither encouraging or discouraging letters to L-C. And, I have no idea what the view of her community is toward letters, except that there are no specific limitations on receiving letters that L-C was made aware of before she entered.

The primary reason for my post above was to pass along the information that L-C will not have the title "Sister" during her postulant year, so that those who felt they wanted to write would know how to address her. I wasn't sure if that information had been shared here before. That's all.

For myself, I was going to play it by ear. However, if a number of people are concerned because L-C has so many friends on Phatmass, I would be willing to write the Prioress to ask her opinion and preference for L-C, since Internet groups and friends are a new phenomenon. (Maybe because I'm not discerning, I'm not afraid to write a Prioress.) However, I have no plans to write the Prioress to ask her that question, and don't think it is necessary for anyone else to write the Prioress to ask. (I wouldn't want the Prioress to be inundated with letters from us, either.) But, I will write the Prioress anyway if a number of people are concerned. For myself, I figured that, in the end, people would feel moved to write as God moved them.

One thing that has always impressed me about L-C is that she and God are already so close, and he seems to be watching and taking care of her so well, that in the matter of letters, God would also make it "come out just right" for L-C, as he has in so many ways already in her calling to this Community.

Just my thoughts, and, as always, I could be entirely off-base since there is so much I don't know.

Edited by IgnatiusofLoyola
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[quote name='IgnatiusofLoyola' timestamp='1286762545' post='2179023']
It's funny, I was thinking that the opposite thing might happen.

In today's world, we're not used to writing letters. In fact, I can't remember the last time I wrote a letter. Even my 83-year old mother now finds it easier to send and receive email than letters. I don't even know what the postage is to send a letter to England from the U.S.

What I wondered might happen is that L-C might get many letters in the beginning from her Phatmass friends and others, but, because it is unusual (and difficult) to write letters to which you don't get an answer, the letters might not continue. Some of this would be expected, of course, and L-C does have a circle of women who have been close friends with her for many years, so I expect they would continue to write in any case. But, they, too, might find it very hard to continue to write.

So, I worried (you know I tend to be a worrier) that, in the longer term, mail might drop off so much that L-C might feel she was not loved and remembered.

Not having been through formation, I don't know how the formation process is different for a cloistered nun than for an active Sister, as L-C will be. And, L-C is not joining a Community where she is likely to be sent elsewhere, particularly to a third-world country or somewhere where she would be unlikely to see her friends and family again, or at least very rarely. From the little bit L-C told me about her life after formation, she will be having constant contact with people in the local community, and will leave the Priory almost every day as part of her apostolate. And, she will remain in England with the Community, not sent elsewhere. Or, to be exact, at least, as far as I am aware, there are no expectations that she will be sent elsewhere.

So, while I expect that one important goal of formation for an active Sister, like a cloistered nun, would be to learn to depend on God and her Sisters, I also wonder whether, after formation, the everyday life of an active Sister in these specific circumstances would be as separate from her former life as it would be for a cloistered nun. Visitors are welcome to the Priory, although I don't know if there are any additional rules if a postulant's family and friends live close by. But, at least after formation, I wonder whether an active Sister in this community would be cut off from her family and friends in the way that a cloistered nun would, or an active Sister who was called to a mission on the other side of the world.

These are mostly questions on my part, since I have know idea--and I expect L-C has no idea at this point--how all this works. So, I'm not suggesting at ALL that L-C should be inundated constantly with letters. I just wonder whether letters would negatively affect the formation of an active Sister in her particular Community and circumstances as much as they would a cloistered nun.

BTW--If you noticed, I said in my post that L-C herself said she would love letters--I was simply quoting her words to me and what she has said to others. I was neither encouraging or discouraging letters to L-C. And, I have no idea what the view of her community is toward letters, except that there are no specific limitations on receiving letters that L-C was made aware of before she entered.

For myself, I was going to play it by ear. However, if a number of people are concerned because L-C has so many friends on Phatmass, I would be willing to write the Prioress to ask her opinion and preference for L-C, since Internet groups and friends are a new phenomenon. (Maybe because I'm not discerning, I'm not afraid to write a Prioress.) However, I have no plans to write the Prioress to ask her that question, and don't think it is necessary for anyone else to write the Prioress to ask. (I wouldn't want the Prioress to be inundated with letters from us, either.) But, I will write the Prioress anyway if a number of people are concerned. For myself, I figured that, in the end, people would feel moved to write as God moved them.

One thing that has always impressed me about L-C is that she and God are already so close, and he seems to be watching and taking care of her so well, that in the matter of letters, God would also make it "come out just right" for L-C, as he has in so many ways already in her calling to this Community.

Just my thoughts, and, as always, I could be entirely off-base since there is so much I don't know.
[/quote]


Don't stress about it Iggy - just my thoughts, no one has to pay any attention to them. ACtive or cloistered, all nuns need to detach themselves from the world and attach themselves firmly to God. Formation time is specifically designed for this. But I'm sure that LC can handle whatever happens, too many or not enough letters.....

Just listening to the soundtrack from WEst Side Story (saw the live performance last week with my sister) and the song about being cool is affecting me now.... be cool :P

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[quote name='TradMom' timestamp='1286759048' post='2179005']
+Praised be Jesus Christ

Perhaps if one really wanted to reach out and show support, a good method might be to write to the Community Proper - and clearly say you are thinking of the dear one and specifically ask not for an answer (thus releasing them from social obligations of answering). I do believe most Communities love to know they are held in prayer as we are held in their prayers....

Pax,

TradMom
[/quote]

I think that is an excellent suggestion TradMom--particularly for someone who knows L-C through Phatmass posts, but is not a close friend of hers through personal contact.

But again, God seems to work out things so well for L-C, and he so actively uses others to work out his plans for her, that, despite my worries, I have decided that I will trust that God will move her friends to write L-C at the right time(s) and say the things that will benefit L-C's formation most at that particular time--even if the friends don't realize that it is God who led them to write at that time and led them in what to say.

I have never seen so many "coincidences" that aren't really coincidences but God working, as I have seen in LC's life. God is obviously actively involved in taking care of her.

Edited by IgnatiusofLoyola
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Just throwing in my 2 cents here: I've been corresponding with a few phatmassers in formation over the last several years--nothing too frequent, maybe two or three letters a year per person. I usually hear from them at Christmas, Easter, and in late summer when transitions are taking place, i.e., reception of the habit, etc. My letters have been well received by all, including those in the cloistered communities. Perhaps that's because I try to use good discretion in what I include in a note-- I'm not a twentysomething rattling on about my social life and the sordid details of the newest reality TV shows. By all means, if you can, DO write, even if it's just a quick note, and be understanding of the constraints your friend has accepted in the convent. In my way of thinking, you are continuing to encourage and support them, a spiritual work of mercy, and another way to reflect
Christ to your friends in religious life.

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[quote name='stlmom' timestamp='1286766646' post='2179032']
Just throwing in my 2 cents here: I've been corresponding with a few phatmassers in formation over the last several years--nothing too frequent, maybe two or three letters a year per person. I usually hear from them at Christmas, Easter, and in late summer when transitions are taking place, i.e., reception of the habit, etc. My letters have been well received by all, including those in the cloistered communities. Perhaps that's because I try to use good discretion in what I include in a note-- I'm not a twentysomething rattling on about my social life and the sordid details of the newest reality TV shows. By all means, if you can, DO write, even if it's just a quick note, and be understanding of the constraints your friend has accepted in the convent. In my way of thinking, you are continuing to encourage and support them, a spiritual work of mercy, and another way to reflect
Christ to your friends in religious life.
[/quote]


Very well put. Common sense is sometimes uncommon :)

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[quote name='stlmom' timestamp='1286766646' post='2179032']
Just throwing in my 2 cents here: I've been corresponding with a few phatmassers in formation over the last several years--nothing too frequent, maybe two or three letters a year per person. I usually hear from them at Christmas, Easter, and in late summer when transitions are taking place, i.e., reception of the habit, etc. My letters have been well received by all, including those in the cloistered communities. Perhaps that's because I try to use good discretion in what I include in a note-- I'm not a twentysomething rattling on about my social life and the sordid details of the newest reality TV shows. By all means, if you can, DO write, even if it's just a quick note, and be understanding of the constraints your friend has accepted in the convent. In my way of thinking, you are continuing to encourage and support them, a spiritual work of mercy, and another way to reflect
Christ to your friends in religious life.
[/quote]

Those suggestions sound very wise. Since I've never written to anyone in Formation, your advice is a big help.

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[quote name='IgnatiusofLoyola' timestamp='1286771942' post='2179049']
Those suggestions sound very wise. Since I've never written to anyone in Formation, your advice is a big help.
[/quote]

I think it is important t remember that God is watching over her caring for her very need more tenderly than any of us can... Yet on thr other hand we may eventually be a part of that providing for her needs. Initial lonliness is unavoidable but thatt will only push her to and more towards her new community as they learn to share each others joys and sorrows as one.

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[quote name='nunsense' timestamp='1286751655' post='2178980']
Although it's great to keep in touch with her, and to let her know she's loved, it's probably also a good idea to give her some time to let go of the world and to start focusing only on God and her new life. The reason she isn't allowed to reply is because during the first few years, the postulant and novice is being formed. Too many distractions, even from those who love her dearly, are not going to be in her best interests. She will be experiencing some homesickness and loneliness, even though she is surrounded by all her sisters, and she has to learn how to turn to God for her consolations during this time rather than back to the world of human consolation. So, although it's good to remember her at all special occasions such as birthday and holidays, my advice is not to inundate her with letters and cards that remind her of everything she has left behind.

Just one opinion ..............
:nunpray:
[/quote]

true
also, as she lets go of the world
in the long run, she can bond better with the community and especially with Jesus
sometimes too many letters, and outside attention can get in the way

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