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Pcc Visit-what To Bring Them?


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Thanks strictlyinkblot and mantellata! They do have towels. Also, I think I am going to apply to this community. Thanks for any prayers anyone might've sent my way-they're working, so keep em comi

The Roswell Poor Clare Colletines! I felt such a sense of coming home on my drive... Mother said to go home and if the nuns and my visit are incessantly in my thoughts then that means this is my new h

Thanks everyone--maximillion, God was truly watching over your community's needs! The problem, though, is that it gives me so much joy to give them everything they need/want--ESPECIALLY since I ha

[quote][color=#282828][font='Segoe UI', 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif]I'm trying to fight the holy jealousy but it won't leave...especially when I think about your sisters' gorgeous veils! [/font][/color][/quote]

Ditto!

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Queen'sDaughter

That's wonderful Emma!

"vocation, especially to a particular community, is a mystery-or so I have been told"

According to Father David Mary of the Franciscan Brothers Minor, the reason people enter [i]this [/i]order as opposed to [i]that[/i] order is because each person recieves the same gifts of the Holy Ghost as the founder did.

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Queen'sDaughter

I will let Father speak in his own words, he can explain it much better than I can!


[url="http://www.franciscanbrothersminor.com/FBM/Discernment_Part_XIV_-_Charism_%22Be_who_you_are%22.html"]http://www.francisca...o_you_are".html[/url]


This is why I am a Benedictine, despite those Franciscans constantly trying to recuit me. Seriously, guys, I AM NOT A FRANCISCAN.

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QD: Thanks so much for the link-it really helped me understand better, especially about what Francis and Clare's charism was and how you can recognize that same charism in yourself today.

Hahaha suuuure you're not a franciscan. ;) Just kidding! Can I ask, though, what make Benedictines distinct from other orders? All I got out of a web search was that they handled money differently, and were one of the first orders-if not THE first.

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[quote name='emmaberry' timestamp='1341249220' post='2451510']
QD: Thanks so much for the link-it really helped me understand better, especially about what Francis and Clare's charism was and how you can recognize that same charism in yourself today.

Hahaha suuuure you're not a franciscan. ;) Just kidding! Can I ask, though, what make Benedictines distinct from other orders? All I got out of a web search was that they handled money differently, and were one of the first orders-if not THE first.
[/quote]

For Benedictines the word "order" implies something slightly different to others. There aren't provinces, or a mother-house or a superior general as others have. Benedictines comprise of single autonomous houses without a common or general superior or a centralised system of authority and governance. The unity of the Benedictines comes from the adherence to the same Rule so it is more a spiritual bond than an administrative one. And Benedictines do not make vows of poverty, chastity and obedience: they profess stability, obedience and conversion of life.

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[quote name='EmilyAnn' timestamp='1341284248' post='2451767']
For Benedictines the word "order" implies something slightly different to others. There aren't provinces, or a mother-house or a superior general as others have. Benedictines comprise of single autonomous houses without a common or general superior or a centralised system of authority and governance. The unity of the Benedictines comes from the adherence to the same Rule so it is more a spiritual bond than an administrative one. And Benedictines do not make vows of poverty, chastity and obedience: they profess stability, obedience and conversion of life.
[/quote]

Thanks-you seem so knowledgeable about Benedictines!...probably because you are going to be-I am assuming St C's is Benedictine. Can you tell me more about the feel of their charism? Sorry, that is a vague word, but I hope you understand what I mean. Carmelites/Franciscans/Dominicans all have a certain 'feel' about them...what is that feel for Benedictines?

Are Benedictines always monastic? Thanks! :)

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[quote name='emmaberry' timestamp='1341290644' post='2451824']
Thanks-you seem so knowledgeable about Benedictines!...probably because you are going to be-I am assuming St C's is Benedictine. Can you tell me more about the feel of their charism? Sorry, that is a vague word, but I hope you understand what I mean. Carmelites/Franciscans/Dominicans all have a certain 'feel' about them...what is that feel for Benedictines?

Are Benedictines always monastic? Thanks! :)
[/quote]

Yup, St. C's is Benedictine. Benedictine houses are often formed into Congregations, related to the history of the house. For example, St. C's and their 'brother' community Quarr Abbey are part of the Solesmes Congregation - they were founded after the original Solesmes monks and nuns were exiled from France and made their new home in Ryde. When the situation in France improved, some went back to their original houses but some stayed to carry on the new houses.

Benedictines were one of the first orders to have a community base, rather than be hermits. They are traditionally cloistered but it's kind of like Carmelites, there are a few active communities that have a Benedictine spirituality. I'm sure I'll be able to tell you more after my live-in!

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Queen'sDaughter

Thank you, Emily, for the explainations. I am glad to have fellow Benedictines along for the ride! Here is some of what Sister Scholastica told me about Benedictine Spirituality (edited for privacy and relevancy, though some of this is specific for the Benedictines of Mary):

"Visits are twice a year for two days each. We send out a letter with designated weekend for families to choose from. We do not really receive visits from friends unless an unusual circumstance arises. Otherwise, they could come with families. We are allowed to go home if an immediate family member is near death or for the funeral.
With regards enclosure, yes, we have to be adopting a better enclosure as soon as space permits. Papal enclosure (behind a grille) is not really being considered, as this would pose some difficulty for our charism and unified community living. Papal enclosure necessitates extern sisters. "Extensive hospitality" is one of the reasons listed to observe Constitutional Enclosure according to the Vatican document on the enclosure of nuns, Verbi Sponsa. But we will eventually be separated from the guest house, have a large portion of land and of the building "off limits" to outsiders. We would still be permitted to leave with permission according to necessity and what is in accord with the charism.
The Benedictine understanding of poverty is that of the Holy Family of Nazareth. It is not that of the Franciscans, who idealize Christ's poverty upon the cross. The Holy Rule indicates that each member's (real) needs must be given consideration and met under obedience if possible. For example, St. Benedict would have us keep our old habits "for the poor" and receive new ones. There is a sense that we could give things away to the poor, while living with what we actually do need. This is what I meant by Nazareth. It is funny, but we often share food donations with our Franciscan friends, and there is sometimes still enough to give to a food pantry!"

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Another very important aspect of Benedictine spirituality is Simplicity.

I like what is said of it here:

[url="http://www.osbpgh.org/News_PDFs/summer08.pdf"]http://www.osbpgh.org/News_PDFs/summer08.pdf[/url]

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Bring em ice cream, either in a tub or individual ice creams like drumsticks or something. We took these to the Benedictines last time we visited and they loved them. The Carmelite extern told me to do it because she said people often give them chocolates or biscuits (cookies) but not many people think about ice cream and they don't buy it for themselves. :)

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LOL, funny story. When I went to visit the Religious Sisters of Mercy in Alma, MI in November, I could not believe how much ice cream had been donated to them. The novice house had a HUGE tub of vanilla ice cream. That's not the half of it, though, because when I went back to the convent in Saginaw with Sr. Catherine Marie (and another retreatant), you should have seen how much ice cream the Sisters pulled out so us retreatants could make ice cream sundaes. They had all different kinds of Edy's -- Cherry Vanilla, Rocky Road, Orange Sherbert, Chocolate and Vanilla swirl. I've never seen that much ice cream in my whole life. :hehe2:

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Thanks everyone for the suggestions! And thanks for all the information on Benedictine spirituality. I can honestly say that I often wish I was called to the Benedictines of Mary..but, alas, I am not. I love the Benedictine 'feel' though!

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