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[quote name='faithcecelia' timestamp='1318377204' post='2319882']

But again, as you will be under 18 you need to listen to your parent's advice and come to decisions that they are happy with too.
[/quote]

Of course, while she is still in high school she must listen to her parents. And even after, it would be good to have them supporting her decision, but I am assuming that after high school, she will be 18 and able to make her own decision, and parents are not always happy with the decisions their kids make. I know that I did not want my daughter to leave home at 18 because I believed she should go to college first too. But I am so proud of her now and so glad to see that she is happy.

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[quote name='FutureSister2009' timestamp='1318539553' post='2320771'] FYI, I'm not going into a cloister. [/quote] Your eagerness is beautiful to see, and the honesty and candour with which y

No, a Benedictine. It's a tall dark stranger with an edging of white round the head and neck. I see it, it grows ever clearer...

You know... in the case of the maturity argument... I honestly think a young person matures [i]better[/i] in the convent than in college! College really doesn't give you much in the way of real world

If you do end up going, I recommend a good Catholic College. Try to be a Theology major like me. I don't see what the point is of going to college if you're going to be in a cloister though. But what I would rather be doing is traveling right now. The stress of school is getting to me so I'm not in the best mood at the present time

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My concern, Allyson, is that what happens if the cloister isn't for you? What happens if you stay 5 years and then leave? I think it's better to just wait the few years, finish your education, grow up, get life experience and then enter the cloister. I know you shouldn't enter thinking you will ever leave, but we have all learned from other posters that this often happens - sometimes more than once. It's only a few years - who knows - maybe you will cultivate some talents in school that would be useful in the monastery.

Em

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I didn't add that up there, but I just wanted to restate that only you can make that decision... we can definitely offer our opinions on here, but they are just our opinions.

What we can offer though, is prayers and solidarity. As you can see, you've got people on all sides- No college, catholic college, public college. But know that I am praying that above all, these next few years be a time to focus on your relationship with Him! Then, he will lead you exactly where you need to be!

Vocation station is amesome, isn't it??? Where else would you find so many people discerning?

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Also, the solid Catholic colleges in the U.S. tend to be expensive. Steubenville only gives loans. Make sure that you do your homework as far as tuition costs, financial aid, working during the summers, work study jobs, and how much your parents can afford.

You said that you'll be 17 when you graduate. How long after you graduate will you be 18 because at that age you can go without the consent of your parents if you decide that entering the convent instead of college is what God is calling you to do? It seems like in our society everyone says to go to college right after high school but it isn't for everyone. You can become mature in the convent or if you want to do something like NET ministries or work right after high school until you're 18.

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You know... in the case of the maturity argument... I honestly think a young person matures [i]better[/i] in the convent than in college! College really doesn't give you much in the way of real world experience. Not to say college is bad- just that's a whole different experience in of itself which is nothing like the real world.

When in college, you can choose whether or not you're going to be responsible. You can make bad decisions. You can live off of top ramen.

In the convent, you are taught to be a well-rounded woman. You are given responsibilities. You learn a heck of alot about how to clean and cook and take care of things.

Hm. Yeah, I think the convent usualy tends to help young people mature more quickly than does a college campus. But that's just my experience, having seen both (with barely 18 year olds in the convent now). The key, I think, is in the formators. If they know how to interact with people of different ages, then they can best do their job for the good of the young person entering.

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I agree with most of what you write, Teresa Benedicta, but I would point out that there is more to maturity than learning how to clean and cook and take care of practical things. There is emotional maturity as well, and people definitely need a certain measure of this before they enter religious life. College can be a good way of deepening this, as you are placed with a diverse group of personalities (some of whom won't be to your natural tastes at all!). You also have the opportunity to teach yourself to persevere with things that you find difficult or simply don't like very much. Of course, it's possible to choose to cut class or to complain all the time about this roommate and that homework. College won't force you to mature. But nothing can force maturity, not even a convent. It has to be a conscious choice.

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[quote name='beatitude' timestamp='1318459955' post='2320328']
College can be a good way of deepening this, as you are placed with a diverse group of personalities (some of whom won't be to your natural tastes at all!). You also have the opportunity to teach yourself to persevere with things that you find difficult or simply don't like very much. Of course, it's possible to choose to cut class or to complain all the time about this roommate and that homework. College won't force you to mature. But nothing can force maturity, not even a convent. It has to be a conscious choice.
[/quote]
I'm not trying to be contrary, but imho it seems that this applies to entering a convent as well.
The convent can be a good way of deepening this, as you are placed with a diverse group of personalities (some of whom won't be to your natural tastes at all!). You also have the opportunity to teach yourself to persevere with things that you find difficult or simply don't like very much. Of course, it's possible to choose to cut prayer or to complain all the time about this sister and that duty. The convent won't force you to mature. But nothing can force maturity, not even college. It has to be a conscious choice.
So it could go either way, it depends on the person. God knows which is best for each of us, and He'll lead us there. I second NET. I have a peer who's doing it this year, and if it becomes clear I won't be entering next year, I want to apply.

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As we see, there are as many opinions as there are people to give them, and all of them have validity. In the end it comes down to the individual and their own situation, and no decision is guaranteed to be free from errors, so we do just have to take each step according to our own (well formed) conscience and then leave the rest up to God in His infinite mercy.

Prayers for your discernment - whatever your final choice. :pray:

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Just wanted to add another consideration. Even if one's call is to cloistered life and enters and makse solemn vows, when having some college or life/work experience beyond high school would bring valuable knowledge and skills to the community. Even monasteries need folks who know how to deal with the outside world wisely- someone needs to be prioress :wacko: ! While life experience and college education would certainly not be the main consideration in selecting leadership in a monastery, I can tell you from experience that it does come in to consideration.

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[quote name='nunsense' timestamp='1318468734' post='2320390']
As we see, there are as many opinions as there are people to give them, and all of them have validity. In the end it comes down to the individual and their own situation, and no decision is guaranteed to be free from errors, so we do just have to take each step according to our own (well formed) conscience and then leave the rest up to God in His infinite mercy.

Prayers for your discernment - whatever your final choice. :pray:
[/quote]

Amen. ;)

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[quote name='tinytherese' timestamp='1318447176' post='2320256']
Also, the solid Catholic colleges in the U.S. tend to be expensive. Steubenville only gives loans. Make sure that you do your homework as far as tuition costs, financial aid, working during the summers, work study jobs, and how much your parents can afford.

You said that you'll be 17 when you graduate. How long after you graduate will you be 18 because at that age you can go without the consent of your parents if you decide that entering the convent instead of college is what God is calling you to do? It seems like in our society everyone says to go to college right after high school but it isn't for everyone. You can become mature in the convent or if you want to do something like NET ministries or work right after high school until you're 18.
[/quote]

WHY DID I NOT THINK ABOUT THAT???? You're a GOD-SENT. I'd turn 18 the September after I graduate. I don't know how I didn't think about that. YES

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[quote name='Emma' timestamp='1318445880' post='2320245']
My concern, Allyson, is that what happens if the cloister isn't for you? What happens if you stay 5 years and then leave? I think it's better to just wait the few years, finish your education, grow up, get life experience and then enter the cloister. I know you shouldn't enter thinking you will ever leave, but we have all learned from other posters that this often happens - sometimes more than once. It's only a few years - who knows - maybe you will cultivate some talents in school that would be useful in the monastery.

Em
[/quote]

FYI, I'm not going into a cloister.

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