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Questionable Catholic Identity Of Seton Home Study School


dells_of_bittersweet

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dells_of_bittersweet

Is anyone here familiar with the national Catholic home schooling group Seton Home Study School? I regret to say that I am a graduate. Academically, it is overall quite good (although I think they make some very poor choices in how they teach certain material-but that's another discussion). However, in some regards their high school curriculum reflects the opinions of the people who run the school rather than actual church teaching. For example:

 

1. Use of science textbooks printed by Abeka Books, printed by hardcore protestant fundamentalists. These state that evolution is a heresy and that all good Christians must believe in 6 day creationism. Furthermore, they are quite adamant that "theistic evolution" is unbiblical.

 

2. Use of economics and government textbooks printed by the same crazy people at Abeka. The economics textbook denies Catholic social teaching all over the place, and the lesson plans ignore the theological problems in it. The economics book has a libertarian outlook to it. The government text even has a big smiling picture of J. Strom Thurmond. 

 

3. Every single religion text was originally written prior to Vatican II. Purposefully ignoring a major church council should set off alarm bells. 

 

4. Several books expressly deny Vatican II's declaration on religious freedom. 

 

5. The religion text for senior year is written by someone without any formal theological training or credentials. 

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Hey Dells,  I'm not going to disagree with you because almost everything you wrote was subjective - ie. your opinion - even if you presented some things as objective.   It's perfectly fine if you don'

Their* were* went* The underlined doesn't make sense. Sorry.

Well, there you have it.

Is anyone here familiar with the national Catholic home schooling group Seton Home Study School? I regret to say that I am a graduate. Academically, it is overall quite good (although I think they make some very poor choices in how they teach certain material-but that's another discussion). However, in some regards their high school curriculum reflects the opinions of the people who run the school rather than actual church teaching. For example:

 

1. Use of science textbooks printed by Abeka Books, printed by hardcore protestant fundamentalists. These state that evolution is a heresy and that all good Christians must believe in 6 day creationism. Furthermore, they are quite adamant that "theistic evolution" is unbiblical.

 

2. Use of economics and government textbooks printed by the same crazy people at Abeka. The economics textbook denies Catholic social teaching all over the place, and the lesson plans ignore the theological problems in it. The economics book has a libertarian outlook to it. The government text even has a big smiling picture of J. Strom Thurmond. 

 

3. Every single religion text was originally written prior to Vatican II. Purposefully ignoring a major church council should set off alarm bells. 

 

4. Several books expressly deny Vatican II's declaration on religious freedom. 

 

5. The religion text for senior year is written by someone without any formal theological training or credentials. 

 

I'm a Seton graduate. While I appreciated the academic rigor of the courses, I had issues too.

 

1. Yeah, 100% agree, this is a serious problem. I was very behind in science, and honestly, their arguments for 6 day creationism are bull.

2. Yes, also agree. Much too hardcore on the evangelicalism.

3. It would have been nice to see Theology of the Body as a teen. I think I may have missed this one back then though because of exceptionally good formation through the parish youth group and so on. But looking back, I see you're right.

4. I don't remember this one, but as I have all the books here, I'd be curious to see where you found that. Can you just say which books it was in, so I can look for it?

5. I don't see that as super damning in itself, but yeah, I thought senior year could have been done a lot better.

 

I don't think it's anti-Catholic, it's just very slanted.

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I wouldn't say anti-Catholic, but defiantly 100% backwards on modern science and about 50% on current theology.  Their high school science is inexcusable.  Fortunately, since my local schools carry the same accreditation, if I ever get to that point with seton my children will be transferring in the science classes from a public.  As much as I dislike the modern secularism and sexualization of high schoolers (even in Catholic schools) I'd rather them face that than be grossly misinformed.

 

While I love the rote memorization of learning your faith, I am deeply concerned about some of the incorrect theology displayed in even the most basic Baltimore Catechism that I do not want my future young children to learn.  Even those condemn unbaptized infants to "God's mercy" and deny them heaven, as well as pretty much deny that anyone who's not Catholic will not be admitted into Heaven unless they have a deathbed conversion.  A Setoner once told my mom (a DRE) that she just HAD to teach from the Baltimore Cat...and gave my mom Seton's materials...she was really disturbed by Seton's footnotes of this material, even to first-communion level children.

 

Their history is a bit revisionist, which is sad, because 90% of the time they have really good points.  However, it's totally lost by some really silly and bogus claims....like denying the intricate tie of Catholicism to the patriarchy of the old European nations' governing style.  I know my dad read it through and was concerned about the justification for state-authorized murder over "treason" that really was only differences in religious opinions/practices.

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Seton Home Study School curriculum is based on the Baltimore Catechism. 

 The Baltimore Catechism was the de facto standard Catholic school text in the United States from 1885 to the late 1960s.

My elementary education was based on the Baltimore Catechism as was my parents and my grand parents before them.

I don’t see anything wrong or bad with it.

 My kids all aced there SAT’s, it was no accident

All my children where homeschooled, all when on to complete a college education of their choice.

The only think I see wrong here is:   The OP appears to be unappreciative of  love and devotion of her parents give their children to provide one on one teaching and special undivided attention in there upbringing…

.

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Seton Home Study School curriculum is based on the Baltimore Catechism.
The Baltimore Catechism was the de facto standard Catholic school text in the United States from 1885 to the late 1960s.
My elementary education was based on the Baltimore Catechism as was my parents and my grand parents before them.
I don’t see anything wrong or bad with it.
My kids all aced there SAT’s, it was no accident
All my children where homeschooled, all when on to complete a college education of their choice.
The only think I see wrong here is: The OP appears to be unappreciative of love and devotion of her parents give their children to provide one on one teaching and special undivided attention in there upbringing…
.


Their* were* went*

The underlined doesn't make sense. Sorry.

Edited by Deus_te_Amat
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CHORTLE!!!!    :hehe2:

 

I wasn't homeschooled (wasn't even an option, frankly, back when young dinosaurs roamed the earth...) but what do those of you who ARE / were / are thinking about homeschooling make of this:

 

http://www.kolbe.org

 

Was set up by 3 families in the Napa Valley of California who wanted a better option for their kids in the 1980's.   The school and now this homeschool version continue.   Original founding people were advised by Fr. Fessio (Ave Maria University, Ignatius Press) among others.   Very traditionalist and VERY Catholic in identity.

 

I'd be curious to know what you think of it.... certainly seems to have current science, and the lit and english areas seem solid... as does the theo & philo.

 

They don't seem to have accreditation, but they will document a transcript.

 

Thoughts?

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Seton Home Study School curriculum is based on the Baltimore Catechism. 

 The Baltimore Catechism was the de facto standard Catholic school text in the United States from 1885 to the late 1960s.

My elementary education was based on the Baltimore Catechism as was my parents and my grand parents before them.

I don’t see anything wrong or bad with it.

 My kids all aced there SAT’s, it was no accident

All my children where homeschooled, all when on to complete a college education of their choice.

The only think I see wrong here is:   The OP appears to be unappreciative of  love and devotion of her parents give their children to provide one on one teaching and special undivided attention in there upbringing…

.

 

The Baltimore Catechism is a wonderful tool, when used thoughtfully.   There are some answers that are either blatantly wrong or (more often) are just really, really poorly worded. 

 

Example: 
 

 

 

8. What do we mean when we say that God is the Supreme Being?

When we say that God is the Supreme Being we mean that He is above all creatures, the self-existing and infinitely perfect Spirit.
 

9. What is a spirit?

A spirit is a being that has understanding and free will, but no body, and will never die.

 

 

This creates problems when you add Jesus to the mix, because Jesus certainly has a body, and Jesus is certainly a member of the Trinity, and is thus God.  IF they had just written God the Father, or left off "spirit" from question 8, it would have been fine.  As-is, there's some sloppy writing that leaves room for bad theology. Using an edition of the Baltimore Catechism published prior to Vatican II can be problematic if you don't account for theological developments that happened before and during Vatican II.  It's an ecumenical council, it's kind of a big deal. :) 

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I think that to exclusively limit one's theological background to Baltimore Catechism would set one up to NOT be able to explain many nuances of the faith to others.   It is as good as it goes... but the Catechism of the Catholic Church was developed for a reason.

 

Now I am not 100% behind Kolbe, because like every school & program, I think it has some flaws, but I look at this HS Theo curriculum and it looks pretty solid to me.....   

 

http://www.kolbe.org/academics/curriculum-grade-level/high-school/theology-curriculum/

 

What do you think, after looking at it?

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Their* were* went*

The underlined doesn't make sense. Sorry.


Please pardon my poor grammar, The belabored point I was trying to make was that the parents deserve respect in their choice of the school curriculum. Edited by add
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